Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

December 2, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Collection Of My Best Resources On Student Motivation

Yesterday, I published A Collection Of My Best Resources On Teaching English Language Learners, which brought together many of the materials on that topic that I have either written or collected.

And, since I also have a very large amount of materials on student motivation, I’ve decided to publish this post (I’ll also be writing one on parent engagement soon).

I’ve authored three books on helping students develop intrinsic motivation, and a fourth one will be published in 2019. There are a zillion free resources from them, including student hand-outs and lesson plans. Clicking on each of the book’s titles will lead you to all of those freebies:

Helping Students Motivate Themselves: Practical Answers To Classroom Problems

Self-Driven Learning: Teaching Strategies for Student Motivation

Building A Community Of Self-Motivated Learners: Strategies To Help Students Thrive In School and Beyond

Here are some articles I’ve authored or co-authored about student motivation (several are book excerpts). They’ve appeared in various publications, including The Washington Post, Edutopia, Education Week and ASCD Education Leadership:

I’ve published many columns in my Education Week Teacher “teacher advice” column on Student Motivation & Social Emotional Learning.

Justin Baeder at Principal Center Radio interviews me about student motivation in this podcast.

Choice Equals Power: How to Motivate Students to Learn is an article about my work and appeared in MindShift at KQED.

I did this fairly popular ten minute video on student motivation:

Here are some useful “Best” lists related to student motivation:

The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students

The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources

The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”

The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit”

Best Posts On Students Setting Goals

Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control

The Best Resources For Learning How To Best Give Feedback To Students

The Best Resources On “Gratitude”

The Best Ways To Use Stephen Curry & The Warriors For Teaching Social Emotional Learning Skills

The Best Resources For Learning About Mindfulness In The Classroom

The Best Resources On The Value Of Positive “Self-Talk”

The Best Resources On Students Having A “Purpose For Learning”

The Best Resources On Helping Students Make Good Decisions

The Best Resources On Student Agency & How To Encourage It

I did this Transfer of Learning video with Ed Week:

December 2, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Two Good Videos To Help Develop A Positive Classroom Culture

I’ve previously shared a number of ways I try to develop a positive and supportive culture in my class (see The Best Resources On Developing A Sense Of Community In The Classroom).

Here are two videos that I think I’ll try to integrate into some of those lessons. Let em know if you have other clips that you think convey similar messages:

Teamwork

December 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Collection Of My Best Resources On Teaching English Language Learners

I have an insane amount of resources on this blog related to teaching English Language Learners.

I thought readers might find it useful if I put together a collection – in one post – of the materials I have either written or brought together (I’ll be posting a similar collections on student motivation and another one on parent engagement, two of the other topics I’ve written about a lot)

Here goes:

I’ll have to start with All My NY Times Posts For English Language Learners – Linked With Descriptions.  I’ve written nearly one-hundred posts for The New York Times Learning Network over the past few years, and practically all of them have focused on teaching English Language Learners.

I’ve written nearly thirty posts for the British Council, the largest organization promoting English-language teaching and learning around the world, and you can see a list of them – with links – here.

I’ve authored or co-authored three books on teaching English Language Learners, and a fourth one will be published next April.  There are a zillion free resources from them, including student hand-outs and lesson plans.  Clicking on each of the book’s titles will lead you to all of those freebies:

The ELL Teacher’s Toolbox: Hundreds of Practical Ideas to Support Your Students is the one being published in April.  There are only a few resources there now, but that will change as we get closer to that date.

Navigating The Common Core With English Language Learners

The ESL/ELL Teacher’s Survival Guide: Ready-to-Use Strategies, Tools, and Activities for Teaching English Language Learners of All Levels

English Language Learners: Teaching Strategies That Work

Here are some articles I’ve authored or co-authored about teaching ELLs (several are book excerpts). They’ve appeared in various publications, including The Washington Post, Edutopia, Education Week and ASCD Education Leadership:

I’ve published many columns in my Education Week Teacher “teacher advice” column on Teaching English Language Learners.

Eight-minute radio shows accompany most of the Ed Week columns.  You can find the ELL-related ones at All My BAM! Radio Shows About English Language Learners.

Here are a few of the many ELL-related “Best” lists I’ve published (I think these are the most key ones):

The “All-Time” Best Resources On English Language Learners & The Common Core

The “All-Time” Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of English Language Learners

“All-Time” Best Web Tools For English Language Learners

The “All-Time” Best 2.0 Tools For Beginning English Language Learners

The Best Videos For Content Teachers With ELLs In Their Classes – Please Suggest More

The Best Advice To Content Teachers About Supporting English Language Learners

The Best Three Sites On The Web For ESL/EFL/ELL/ELT Teachers

“Ways A Mainstream Teacher Can Support An ELL Newcomer In Class”

November 30, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Interview With Eddie Williams, ELL Teacher Featured In “The Newcomers”

 

Helen Thorpe agreed to answer a few questions about her new book, The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope In an American Classroom over at my Education Week Teacher column last week.

Helen observed a newcomer class in Denver for a year-and-a-half, and documented her experience in the book.

Eddie Williams, the teacher of that class and a central figure in the book, agreed to answer a few of my questions.

LF: First, can you share a little about yourself – how long you’ve been teaching, why you became a teacher, and, in particular, what drew you to teaching English Language Learners?

Eddie Williams:

This is my 14th  year as a teacher. I went to Cal State San Bernardino to attend school and play college soccer. I coached a JV soccer team at a local High School while I was in my junior year and I realized how much I liked working with young people. So, I decided to go into teaching after trying out the business world for a couple of years and not feeling as fulfilled as I wanted.

LF: How did having Helen in your classroom affect your teaching during that year-and-a-half – if it did – and how do you think it affected your students? Were there any moments you had second thoughts?

Eddie Williams:

It was really helpful. Helen would get to know many of the students on a deeper level than I could since she was visiting their homes and often using an interpreter to go in-depth with her conversations with the students or their family members. She would frequently share what she learned about students and their struggles. This helped me get to know my students even better.

LF: What do you think of the finished book?

Eddie Williams:

I really agree with what I interpret the mission of the book to be. I feel this book gives readers some insight into the worlds of amazing young people who happen to be refugees or immigrants. Readers can get a sense for how our students make our community and our world a much better place.

LF: What would you hope the general public learns from the book?  What do you think teachers of English Language Learners can gain from reading it?  Are there two-or-three examples portrayed in the book of particularly good teaching for ELLs?  

Eddie Williams:
The public can learn that our students from countries like Iraq, Syria, Thailand, Congo, Mexico, Guatemala, and so many other countries, bring amazing qualities with them. They have grit. They have a deep sense of gratitude for the opportunities that are available here. They are incredibly hard workers and they are very intelligent. Working with these wonderful young people for 5 years has been one of the greatest gifts I’ve ever received. I don’t think I’ll realize how important this experience has been until much later in life because it will take a while to sink in. Most teachers have stories like this to share, I think, whether they work with refugees, immigrants, English Learners, or native English-Speakers. It’s very rewarding work. I also hope the book can help the general public to celebrate the work of so many teachers that have the privilege of working with our young people. 

 

LF: What other books about teaching in general and/or teaching English Language Learners would you recommend people read and why?

Eddie Williams:

I remember reading The First Days of School by Harry Wong in my first year as a teacher. It was really helpful. A lot of my reading about education is via blogs. Recently, I’ve been reading about different math intervention approaches since that’s what I’m teaching now.

LF: What are you doing now and what do you hope to do in the future?

Eddie Williams:

I’m teaching Math Intervention at a middle school in the Denver Public Schools. I’ve had some interest in teaching math for a while to stay challenged and refreshed. Also, teaching math has much greater job security than English or ELD. I also teach courses in DPS for new teachers on teaching methods for English Learners. During the summer, I usually support an elementary school with curriculum for English Learners and I coach new teachers. So, I’m staying really busy!

LF: Is there anything I haven’t asked you that you’d like to share?

Eddie Williams:

I’d share my concern in our schools regarding an overemphasis on data, record keeping, and standardized test scores.  All of these issues are very controversial, I know. I guess I’d just ask our parents and community to stay informed and involved to make sure that our young people and our schools get what they need to be successful.

LF: Thanks, Eddie!

November 29, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My Latest NY Times Post Is On Helping ELLs Learn Academic Language

 

Enriching Academic Vocabulary: Strategies for Teaching Tier Two Words to E.L.L. Students is the headline of my latest post for The New York Times.

It’s a pretty lengthy one – filled with ideas, downloadable hand-outs and links to additional resources.

I’m adding it to All My NY Times Posts For English Language Learners – Linked With Descriptions.

November 28, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Let’s Learn English” From VOA Looks Like A Nice Online Video Resource

 

Let’s Learn English is a series of online video lessons from Voice of America Learning English.

Each video comes with an online quiz, supplemental videos for vocabulary and speaking practices, a downloadable worksheet and more.  The videos are provided in three different levels of English proficiency.

I probably wouldn’t use them as a class lesson, but I could certainly see giving students the option of using them regularly when we visit the computer lab.  I would imagine they would probably just watch each video and then answer the quizzes.

Their lay-out and organization leave a bit to be desired.   In many ways, content and activities are similar to Annenberg’s older-but-still-good Connect With English (see The New “Connect With English” Site Has Got To Be One Of This Year’s Best New Sites For ELLs). However, the Connect With English site is much more user-friendly and better designed.

But the content and activities are good, and I think students would still like them.

I’m adding this info to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them).

November 28, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Here’s A Typical Formative Assessment I Give To My Beginning ELL Students – How Can You Make It Better?

 

I regularly give my Beginning English Language Learner students low-stakes tests to assess how they’re doing.

Here’s an example of one I’ll give them later this week.  We’re studying “family,” which is the focus of this test.  However, it’s fairly typical of the kind of give no matter what topic we’re studying.

I’ll typically say the words listed in the first part and use them in a sentence, giving students time to write down how they think they’re spelled.

Then, I’ll show the last part of the test on the document camera.  They include clozes (fill-in-the-gaps), sentences written with no words separated so they have to write them correctly, a sentence where they have to correctly use a verb we’ve been studying, some “sentence scrambles,” a question they have to answer, and an incorrectly written sentence they have to re-write correctly.

It’s not a brilliant piece of test-design, but it does tend to give me – and them – a pretty good idea of how they’re doing.

Take a look, and then let me know how you think it can be improved!

 

Family Test

1.Father
2. Mother
3. Son
4. Daughter
5. Grandfather
6. Grandmother
7. Aunt
8. Uncle
9. Cousin
10. Family
11. brother
12. sister
13. The father of my father is my _________________________________________.
14. The son of my uncle is my ____________________________________________.
15. The daughter of my aunt is my ________________________________________.
16. Mygrandfatherisold.

17. My brother and sister _________________ young.
18. love . mother I my

19. goes school sister . my to

20.Where does your father live?

21. Jorge and Emili is brother and sister.

November 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2017

I do an annual “Word of the Year” feature, sharing the choices from various organizations around the world.

Only a few have been chosen so far, but the pace will pick up over the next few weeks and I’ll be adding links to this post.

Before I share this year’s choices, here are my lists from previous years:

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2016

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2015

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2014

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2013

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2012

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2011

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2010

I’m adding this post to All 2017 “Best” Lists – In One Place!

Here’ are this year’s “Words of the Year” picks:

Children’s Word of the Year 2017: trump is from The Oxford Dictionary’s survey of kids in the United Kingdom.

‘Equality’ is Aussie kids’ word of 2017 is from another one of their surveys.

Word of the year 2017: Dictionary.com says ‘complicit’ topped ‘totality’ is from The Guardian.

‘Complicit’ Is The Word Of The Year In 2017, Dictionary.com Says is from NPR.

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