Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

June 28, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
3 Comments

Help Me Understand The Difference Between “Cooperative” & “Collaborative” Learning & How CCSS Views Them Both

As regular readers know, my colleague Katie Hull and I are working on a sequel to our popular ESL/ELL Teacher’s Survival Guide, and it’s going to be a good one.

I’ve run up against a question in my writing and I’m hoping that readers can help…

I’m trying to figure out the difference between cooperative and collaborative learning and, very importantly, how the Common Core Standards views them both.

There seems to be multiple definitions out there about what the two mean – and, boy, do I mean multiple!

It appears to me, and I might very well be wrong, that the Standards use the word “collaborate” in the context of discussions to help individual students develop their own understanding of concepts, like a Socratic Seminar (what might be other examples?). And it also seems to me that the Standards don’t particularly value a cooperative learning project where students are working on a common goal as “collaboration.” However, the Standards would view that kind of project as a valid means towards achieving other Standards, such as “sustained research.”

I’m not an expert on collaborative or cooperative learning, and nor am I an expert on the Common Core Standards.

So I’m hoping the readers will help me out here — am I on the right track or am I missing something?

Print Friendly

June 26, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Getting Student Writers To “Buy-Into” Revision

Many teachers, including me, have experienced the struggle of getting our students to buy into seriously revising their original drafts.

I’ve tried modeling my own writing process, and have met with limited success.

I’ve previously posted this sixth-grader interviewing President Obama. He cut the President off when he began talking about students needing to revise their writing, and that reflects many students’ feelings about it:

I was prompted to think about this by finally getting around to reading a late March New York Times column titled What’s More Important to You: the Initial Rush of Prose or the Self-Editing and Revision That Come After It?

I thought that this excerpt, in particular, would be a good one to share and have my mainstream students (I think it might be too difficult for my ELLs) respond to a prompt along the lines of:

According to Cheryl Strayed, what kind of relationship do original writing and the process of revising it have with each other? Do you agree with her? To support your opinion, be sure to include specific examples drawn from your own experience, your observations of others, or any of your readings.

My-dictionary-definessss

What strategies do you use to get students invested into revising their writing?

I’m adding this post to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

Print Friendly

June 26, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Video For All” Is A Gift For Any Language Teacher Who Uses Video

videoforall

Video For All is a European-funded site filled to the brim with ideas on how to use video in language-teaching.

It looks like an amazing resource.

Even better, Russell Stannard, who is the person who wrote about the site in his great email newsletter, has created a series of videos describing how to best use Video For All.

I’m adding this info to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them).

Print Friendly

June 25, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Short Analysis Of Obamacare Ruling Is Great Tool For Showing Students What Reading Is All About

Thankfully, the Supreme Court today ruled in favor of Obamacare subsidies.

Matthew Yglesias wrote a very useful, and short, piece on the decision that I think would be a great text for students to read and learn what reading is really all about.

Here’s a quick excerpt:

meaning-isnt-built-from

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “Close Reading” — Help Me Find More.

Print Friendly

June 25, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

JSTOR Unveils Potentially Useful “Teaching Resource Newsletter”

jstor

JSTOR, otherwise known as that disappointing place that a Google Search links you to when you’re researching something and find that you have to pay $35 to access a study, created JSTOR Teaching Resources earlier this year and sent out their first newsletter today.

They’re making quite a few of their papers available for free through the effort though, for the life of me, I can’t imagine high school teachers using any of them apart from short excerpts (and that could be valuable). They do have some other resources, though, that might be useful, including an online course for high school students on how to research.

It’s worth keeping an eye on them to see what they can deliver in the future…

Print Friendly

June 24, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

10,000 Words Down; 70,000 More To Go By September 1st

My colleague Katie Hull Sypnieski and I have begun work on the sequel to our popular The ESL/ELL Teacher’s Survival Guide.

We have about 10,000 words done, and have about 70,000 more to go by our September 1st deadline. Thankfully, some of our colleagues are also contributing sections, so we should be able to get it done in time.

I think educators are going to find it very useful.

This will be my eighth book in eight years, and I have reached a firm decision — I’m going to give myself two years to do a book from now on. No more of this book-a-year business!

Print Friendly

June 24, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Milestone Of Sorts: There Are Now Exactly 1,450 Categorized & Regularly Updated “Best” Lists!

I just realized that, with the posting of another “Best” list yesterday, that the count has reached exactly 1,450 of them!

You can see all of them here, and they’re categorized, more or less. And most are regularly updated, too.

Print Friendly

June 24, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

What’s In A Name?

adopt poster Wrote via Compfight

The Best Places For Students To Learn About…Their Names is a “Best” list I keep updated and periodically use in my classes as a resource where students can learn about their names and the concept of names.

Here are some new additions to that list:

What your name tells us about your age, where you live, your political leanings and your job is from The Washington Post.

The Chinese Guide to Avoiding a Bad English Name is from The Atlantic.

What’s In A Name? It Could Matter If You’re Writing To Your Lawmaker is from NPR.

The importance of a name is from The Washington Post.

Print Friendly