Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 31, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Three Good Slides On “Flow”

I’ve been doing some research and writing on the concept of “flow” (and continue to interested in hearing suggestions of movie/TV scenes where the characters are exhibiting it).

In re-looking at Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s TED Talk (which I’ve embedded at the bottom of this post), three of his slides stood out to me, so I took screenshots to share here and at The Best Resources For Learning About “Flow.”

Here they are:

flow

flow chart

flow1

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July 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Do You Have Suggestions Of Movie/TV Scenes Showing People In “Flow”?

I’ve recently been spending some time thinking about developing a lesson to help my students understand the idea of entering into a “state of flow” — completely absorbed in a learning task.

You can read more about the concept at The Best Resources For Learning About “Flow.”

Do you have any suggestions of movie or TV scenes showing people in a “state of flow”?

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July 29, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Two More Important Commentaries On Recent Deliberate Practice Study

I’ve previously posted about the big new study that raised questions about the role of deliberate practice in becoming an “expert” at something (see Big New Study On Deliberate Practice).

Here are two more important commentaries on that study that I’m adding to The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice:

We’ve Been Thinking About Talent The Wrong Way All Along is by Daniel Coyle.

Actually, practice doesn’t always make perfect — new study is by Alfie Kohn.

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July 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Students Seeing Assets, Not Deficits, In Their Neighborhoods

My favorite lesson each year is when my students compare their neighborhood with the wealthiest neighborhood in Sacramento, and then write a persuasive essay about which one they think is better.

At least ninety percent of them choose their neighborhood.

You can read — at length — about that lesson at A Lesson Highlighting Community Assets — Not Deficits.

Here’s a powerful tweet about Chicago students look at the assets in their neighborhood, too:

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July 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Two Good Resources For Virtual Field Trips

Here are two new additions to The Best Resources For Finding And Creating Virtual Field Trips:

6 virtual field trips to give lesson plans a boost is from Education Dive.

Here’s a map of virtual field trips and webcams that I learned about from Richard Byrne. You can see a bigger version here.


View Virtual Tours & Webcams in a larger map

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July 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Still Looking For Student Project Ideas That Include Family Engagement

Earlier this year, I published The Best Student Projects That Need Family Engagement — Contribute Your Lessons! over at my parent engagement blog.

I heard from a number of teachers sharing projects they have their students do that include some kind of specific family involvement, ranging from interviews to collecting bugs. You can read about them over at that list.

I thought I’d put out another call to readers who might have missed it then, or who are new readers of this blog.

So if you do any kind of student project with a family component, please leave a comment on this post and I’ll add it to that list!

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July 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Two Good Resources On Asking Good Questions

July 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Even More MacGyver Clips Showing “Transfer Of Learning”

I just discovered a MacGyver wiki that has a List of problems solved by MacGyver. It lists all the episodes, along with the problems he solved in each one and how he solved them. In addition, today I discovered that CBS has put all the MacGyver episodes on YouTube.

Based on quick review, here are a few more clips I’m adding to The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning.” I’m sure there are more if you want to take the time to look through the wiki. On some of them, I have included quotes from the wiki. I was originally going to use TubeChop to just share the clips themselves, but it didn’t seem to be working well today. So, I’ve embedded some of the entire episodes with instructions of when to start them:

On this one, the Pilot Episode, “”MacGyver plugs a sulfuric acid leak with chocolate. He states that chocolate contains sucrose and glucose. The acid reacts with the sugars to form elemental carbon and a thick gummy residue (proved to be correct on Mythbusters).” Start at 35:40 and end at 38:20

On this next one, Fire and Ice, “MacGyver opens a vault and steals back some diamonds first dusting the buttons for fingerprints with graphite from a pencil. The vault has a three-digit combination with unique digits and six buttons. The dusting narrows down the 120 combinations to 6 and the vault is easily opened. He then neatly gets the diamonds in a small bag using a paper as a funnel. (31.30) “Math and science do prove useful.” Start at 32:30 and end at 34:15.

Here, “MacGyver created a diversion and a surprise attack using an inner tube, pressured air, chloride, a catalyst, two glass jars and a gas mask. The inflatable boat was put in a truck and filled with air until the glass broke creating a loud noise. Meanwhile MacGyver filled the two gas bombs filling one glass jar with chloride and the other with a catalyst. Then he threw them at the bad guys resulting in a reaction producing toxic chlorine gas when the two liquids mixed. (36.00) When I was a kid my grandpa gave me two things I’ll never forget; a subscription of popular mechanics and a chemistry set. And this place was one BIG chemistry set! – MacGyver” Start at 36:00 and ends at 44:00

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July 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Do You Know Of Movie/TV Scenes Showing The Value Of Taking Risks & Making Mistakes?

I’ve got a ton of resources at The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures, including the videos that everybody knows (Michael Jordan commercial, Famous Failures, etc.).

However, I don’t have any clips from movies or TV shows that illustrate the idea — in a funny or serious way.

Do you have any suggestions?

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July 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

It Doesn’t Matter If It’s “Effective” If Students Won’t Do It

An article in District Administration Magazine raises issues about the effectiveness of Booktrack, a website and app that provides a “soundtrack” of music, street sounds, etc. to a book (students can also create their own sounds). Some question research (funded by Booktrack) that suggests it improves comprehension.

I’ve previously posted about Booktrack, and think highly of it. I’ve seen some of my least interested readers regularly get very engaged in a book they can read on their phone using Booktrack.

And that’s the key — engagement. I’m not sure if students using Booktrack would score better than a control group not using it on a comprehension test.

But I also don’t care.

What I do know is that students who wouldn’t read are going to score a lot less on a comprehension test than those who did (not that test scores are the be all and end all of assessments).

It gets to an issue of previously written about a few times.

Research might be able to identify the best ways to get things done, but it doesn’t really matter if people won’t do those things.

Research can’t exist in a vacuum, especially where our students are concerned.

You can read these past posts (and don’t miss the comments section with them) for further discussion on this issue:

How Reading Strategies Can Increase Student Engagement

The “Best Learning Techniques” Are Useless If Students Won’t Do Them — A Critical Take On A Well Done Study

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July 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Almost Done With My Third Book On Helping Students Develop Intrinsic Motivation!

787219060214658_a-052f1ee4_9qVRUg_pm-15q3rps

I’m about two-thirds down with the third book in my series on helping students develop intrinsic motivation, and I think it’s looking pretty good. I might be biased, though :)

Its tentative title is Building a Community of Self-Motivated Learners: Strategies for Teaching Resilience, Respect, and Responsibility , and Routledge should have it published by next Spring.

In the meantime, though, feel free to check out my six books that have been published already. You can find free resources related to each of them here.

After I get the completed manuscript done next month for this motivation book, my colleague Katie Hull Sypnieski and I have to begin work on a sequel to our surprisingly popular book, The ESL/ELL Teacher’s Survival Guide, published by Jossey-Bass. The manuscript for that one is due next summer.

After that, who knows? I’m running out of space in this motivation book, so I might even end up doing a fourth title in that series….

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July 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Three Good Resources On Metacognition

Here are three new additions to The Best Posts On Metacognition:

Metacognition is from The Center For Teaching.

Promoting Student Metacognition is a very nice chart of questions students can ask themselves.

50 Questions To Help Students Think About What They Think is from Teach Thought.

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July 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Excellent English-Learning App Duolingo Now Takes On TOEFL & IELTS

duo

Duolingo, which is on a bunch of my “Best” lists as a language-learning app (my students love it!) have not made it official — they’ve just unveiled an English test they want to rival the TOEFL and IELTS, tests that international students need to pass prior to attending a university in most English-speaking countries.

You can read more about it at this TechCrunch post, and here’s a video:

I wouldn’t bet against Duolingo…

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July 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

“FluencyTutor” Could Be A Useful Tool For Students To See Their Reading Progress

fluency

Richard Byrne posted yesterday about an intriguing new site that would be useful for emerging readers and English Language Learners called FluencyTutor For Google.

It’s a web app only usable with a Chrome browser that provides a large selection of leveled reading passages that students can read, record, and store on Google Drive. Teachers can then listen at their convenience and correct and note students’ reading fluency. The reading passages provide quite a few supportive features that make them particularly accessible to English Language Learners.

Most of the features are free, but teachers have to pay $99 per year for some “dashboard” services like tracking student progress.

If I was teaching an online class of motivated adult English Language Learners, I could see FluencyTutor’s whole package as an excellent tool.

However, I definitely wouldn’t recommend a classroom teacher using it as a way to track a readers’ progress. I have the same concerns about using it for that as I have about Literably, a web tool in the same vein — having students read to us is as much about building the relationship (if not more so) than getting the data.

On the other hand, though, a site like FluencyTutor could be a super tool for students to practice on their own and compare their reading progress during a school year. It’s less about them tracking exactly how many words they read each minute and more about them seeing how their reading prosody — expressiveness, smoothness — improves. Just having the free features should be enough for accomplishing that goal.

Here’s a video explaining how it works — keep in the mind that some of the features it talks about the end are the ones you have to pay for:

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July 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Open Curriculum” Has Math Lessons & An Easy Lesson Plan Builder

open

Open Curriculum is a new free site that right now shares lots of math lessons, and plans to expand to English and Science lessons soon.

I looked at a couple of the math lessons, and they seemed relatively decent, but I’m definitely no judge of math lesson plans. Because of that, I’m not ready to consider adding it to The Best Places To Find Free (And Good) Lesson Plans On The Internet.

However, their lesson plan builder seems pretty easy and useful, so I am adding it to The Best Places On The Web To Write Lesson Plans.

I’ll be interested to see what eventually share for English and Science.

You can read more about the site at TechCrunch.

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July 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Seven Good “Reads” On Ed Tech

Here are several recent good pieces related to educational technology:

10 Things Every Teacher Should Know How To Do With Google Docs is from Edudemic.

Will Computers Ever Replace Teachers? appeared in The New Yorker.

3 Reasons Why Chromebook Beats iPad in 1:1 Programs is from edSurge.

My Flipped Classroom Experience is by Kenneth Headley. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On The “Flipped Classroom” Idea.

Classroom Management and the Flipped Class is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to the same list.

Ed tech that needs nothing but a TV and VCR? is from The Hechinger Report.

Betting Big on Personalized Learning is from Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Understanding “Personalized Learning.”

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July 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More!

I’ve been doing some thinking and writing about the idea of “transfer of learning” — helping students be able to apply what they learn in one situation to other contexts. I’ve previously posted The Best Resources For Learning About The Concept Of “Transfer” — Help Me Find More.

I think I have a pretty good understanding of it now as I prepare a lesson plan. However, I’d like to spice it up with videos of movie or TV scenes, stories from real-life or from literature, and pithy quotes and hope readers will contribute suggestions.

Obviously, this science from Apollo 13 and other clips from The Best Videos Showing “Thinking Outside The Box” — Help Me Find More could apply, but I’m hoping for a lot more.

I happened upon a comment in a paper about transfer saying the Karate Kid was a good example, and they sure were right.

Pat Morita having the kid do a variety of tasks like waxing a car and painting a fence helps him develop skills that he is then able to apply in a totally different situation. If you don’t remember the movie, here is the progression of scenes:

Here are some great MacGyver videos where he demonstrates transfer of learning — he has to remember what he learned in the past and apply that knowledge to entirely new situations in order to save his life:

Two kinds of transfers of learning are called “backward-reaching” and “forward-thinking.” In “backward-reaching,” you’re applying what you have previously learned to a new situation — that is demonstrated in the Karate Kid and MacGyver videos.

In a TEDx talk by Marc Chun about transfer, he talked about James Bond being a good example of “forward-thinking transfer.” In other words, when the scientist Q would give him his deadline gadgets prior to a mission, he would need to think about what situations he might use them in.

Here are some clips of Bond getting those gadgets from Q. The first one is probably the best one. The last two are compilations that include getting the gadgets prior to a mission and using gadgets. Unfortunately, they’re out of order so you might see a clip of him getting one followed by a clip of his using another. Too bad they’re not coordinated.

I discovered a MacGyver wiki that has a List of problems solved by MacGyver. It lists all the episodes, along with the problems he solved in each one and how he solved them. In addition, I discovered that CBS has put all the MacGyver episodes on YouTube.

Based on quick review, here are a few more clips I’m adding to this list. On some of them, I have included quotes from the wiki. I was originally going to use TubeChop to just share the clips themselves, but it didn’t seem to be working well today. So, I’ve embedded some of the entire episodes with instructions of when to start them:

On this one, the Pilot Episode, “”MacGyver plugs a sulfuric acid leak with chocolate. He states that chocolate contains sucrose and glucose. The acid reacts with the sugars to form elemental carbon and a thick gummy residue (proved to be correct on Mythbusters).” Start at 35:40 and end at 38:20

On this next one, Fire and Ice, “MacGyver opens a vault and steals back some diamonds first dusting the buttons for fingerprints with graphite from a pencil. The vault has a three-digit combination with unique digits and six buttons. The dusting narrows down the 120 combinations to 6 and the vault is easily opened. He then neatly gets the diamonds in a small bag using a paper as a funnel. (31.30) “Math and science do prove useful.” Start at 32:30 and end at 34:15.

Here, “MacGyver created a diversion and a surprise attack using an inner tube, pressured air, chloride, a catalyst, two glass jars and a gas mask. The inflatable boat was put in a truck and filled with air until the glass broke creating a loud noise. Meanwhile MacGyver filled the two gas bombs filling one glass jar with chloride and the other with a catalyst. Then he threw them at the bad guys resulting in a reaction producing toxic chlorine gas when the two liquids mixed. (36.00) When I was a kid my grandpa gave me two things I’ll never forget; a subscription of popular mechanics and a chemistry set. And this place was one BIG chemistry set! – MacGyver” Start at 36:00 and ends at 44:00

Thanks to reader Pam Pryer, here is an excellent example of transfer of learning demonstrated by everybody’s favorite fish, Nemo.

In the first video, he learns what “swimming down” can do and, in the second, he uses that knowledge to save hundreds of other fish:

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July 20, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

All My Ed Week Posts On Parent Engagement In One Place!

Q & A Collections: Parent Engagement In Schools is my latest post at Education Week Teacher.

It brings together all my Ed Week posts related to parent engagement from the past three years.

Here’s an excerpt:

Simply-put-parent

I’m adding it to My Best Posts, Articles & Interviews On Parent Engagement.

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July 19, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Ed Week Reduces Price For The Next Seven Days On My Classroom Management Book

qanda

Education Week just announced that the price for my latest e-book has been reduced for this week only.

You can read excerpts, reviews and other free resources here.

Here’s the Ed Week announcement:

SPECIAL LIMITED-TIME OFFER: SUMMER-READING SAVINGS
Classroom Management Q & As: Effective Strategies for Teaching by Larry Ferlazzo

Get ready for the new school year and save!

In this e-book, award-winning teacher and Education Week Teacher blogger Larry Ferlazzo turns to leading educators for advice on the most common classroom-management issues. Ferlazzo and his contributors respond Q & A-style to a variety of questions, such as:

–How can I help my students develop self-control?
–What does real student engagement look like?
–How can I stop disruptive behavior?

This e-book brings together the best contributions from Ferlazzo’s blog Classroom Q & A With Larry Ferlazzo, including updates and new material. It captures his unique perspective on managing a classroom and engaging students, while tapping the collective wisdom of educators to provide solutions to some of the thorniest problems in teaching.

Buy on Amazon and save, only $6.99. Hurry, offer limited until July 25th.

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