Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 2, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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How My Fall Semester University Students Evaluated Me

As regular readers know, I’ve been a big proponent of having my high school students write regular anonymous evaluations, which I publish here – warts and all.

You can find all of those reports, as well as reflective articles on the use and misuse of student evaluations, at Best Posts On Students Evaluating Classes (And Teachers).

Since I’ve begun teaching a class-a-week to credential candidates, I’ve begun applying the same practice:

How My University Students Evaluated Me This Semester

How My University Students Evaluated Me Spring Semester

This past fall semester, I posed four questions to students in my class on teaching English Language Learners:

What did you like about this class?

How could this class be improved?

What grade would you give Larry Ferlazzo?

What would you like to learn next semester [it’s a two-part course]?

Here are the results, along with a little of my own reflection:

  • What did you like about this class?

My Summary: Students clearly appreciated the many practical tips and stories I provided, and the fact that we actually practiced the instructional strategies as part of the class. They appreciated that class time was organized. Students reall appreciated having exemplars of assignments from previous classes. They also liked the resources I was able to provide through this blog, and loved the cookies and snacks my wife made me bring to each class 🙂

Here are some quotes:

I like that you offered lots of practical advice that we could use i our classes the next day and that you made it clear that this advice was grounded in theory and research.

I liked that you are precise in your timing, like a German train.

I liked the useful class tips and your willingness to skip out crap you felt not needed.

  • How could this class be improved?

My Summary: A common theme, and a justifiable one, was needing to have better organization of materials in the class site on the university’s learning management system (Blackboard).  One student characterized it as a “disaster,” though most didn’t go quite that far. I would agree, however, that it could have been a lot better.  Last year’s class criticized occasional lateness of getting materials online – that wasn’t an issue at all this year.  So now it’s time for me to move to the next step of getting it more organized.

Another common critique, which echoes ones from last year, was the sheer number of assignments.  Last year’s concerns resulted in our being able to reduce the assignments in the second semester, but we didn’t eliminate or move any from the first semester.  All the assignments are important – I think I’ll raise with my colleagues the possibility of seeing if we could move one to the second semester.  A couple of students also suggested making this half-semester class a full semester one, though I suspect that is a less workable suggestion.

Several students also commented that they felt some of the reading and the requested reading responses were not particularly useful, and that the PowerPoints should be revised – all worth discussing with my colleagues.

Another suggestion was creating more time during class to work on assignments.

Here are some quotes:

This course required more time outside of class than any other in terms of workload and Ifelt the reading responses made me do less quality work on the assignment that matter.

SacCT [Blackboard] was a disaster if I’m being brutally honest.  The descriptions of the weekly folders were convoluted and not concise.

  • What grade would you give Larry Ferlazzo?

My Summary: Sixty percent of the class gave me either an A+, A or A-; everybody else gave me a either a B+, B or B- (except for one person who gave me a C+).   These are higher grades than I received the first year I taught it, and reflects both my increased comfort with teaching the class (and enjoying it more!) and applying some of the suggestions from last year’s students.

Here are some quotes:

Larry is a kind and knowledgeable teacher with the experience and reputation of a seasoned professional.

I would grade you with an A becaue you tried to make class fund and engaging, and you genuinely cared about our individual situations.

  • What would you like to learn next semester?

Here are some of the suggestions – all will be easy to include:

Practical applications on how to deal with varying levels and varying languages in a single class period without losing your mind – actual tools, not theory.

I would like to learn about advocacy for ELLs.  It might be beyond the scope of this class, but when doing the case study I was really floored by how bad the services are at my school, and would love to learn how we as teachers can advocate for more robust services.  

I would like to learn more about educating and supporting long-term ELLs.

Specific ways to encourage motivation and enthusiasm with ELLs and all students. 

I would like to learn more EL strategies that pertain specifically to my content area.

How to get students to talk when no students want to talk.

 

All in all, it was a very good fall semester and I’m looking forward to the spring!

 

January 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Great Free Professional Development For ELL Teachers Is Now Available – The Electronic Village Online

 

Every year about this time, I publish a post advertising the best free professional development for teachers of English Language Learners — The Electronic Village Online:

For five weeks in January and February, TESOL experts and participants from around the world engage in collaborative online discussions or hands-on virtual workshops of professional and scholarly benefit. These sessions bring together participants for a longer period of time than is permitted by land-based professional development conventions and allow a fuller development of ideas than is otherwise possible.

Sessions are free and open to anyone around the globe. It is not necessary to be a TESOL member or attend the TESOL Convention in order to participate. All you need is access to the Internet

The sessions begin next week, so sign-up today!

You might also be interested in The Best Places For ESL/EFL/ELL Teachers To Get Online Professional Development.

January 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Guest Post: Exploring Cultural Values with Students (With Hand-Outs)

Editor’s Note: I’ve shared many resources related to learning about different cultures, including a lesson I do as well as The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.  Today, Josh Kurzweil shares a related lesson he does with his English Language Learners.

Josh Kurzweil began his teaching career in 1990. He has taught and trained in Japan, Spain, the Republic of Georgia, and the United States. He has been teaching at an intensive English program called the International Education Center at Diablo Valley College since 2004. He is a trainer on the SIT TESOL Certificate Course and is on the faculty of the MATESOL program at Marlboro College Graduate School in Marlboro, VT. He is the author of Understanding Teaching Through Learning, which was published by McGraw-Hill in 2006. Josh also runs an educational consulting business called Berkeley LTC, and has designed instructor development programs for labor unions. His particular areas of interest include experiential learning, reflective practice, and instructional design. Josh lives with his wife and son in Berkeley, California:

Exploring Cultural Values with Students

In my advanced reading/writing course, I have students from different countries who usually 17-20 years old and are preparing to go to college. Recently, my colleagues and I developed a unit on culture, which helps these students look more at the ‘invisible’ aspects of culture such as beliefs, values, and attitudes. The unit is primarily based on the work of Geert Hofstede, a Dutch professor who worked for many years in the business world and developed six dimensions of culture using extensive interviews with people from over 70 countries over the last 50+ years.

The dimensions of culture are scales from 0-100 that measure beliefs about power distance, individualism vs. collectivism, masculinity vs. femininity (i.e. competitiveness vs. cooperation), uncertainty avoidance, long-term orientation, and indulgence. Hofstede has made a great deal of his research available online for free, and I have adapted his ideas and created lessons and materials for my ELLs so that they can explore their own culture and that of the U.S. The unit culminates in the students producing a compare/contrast essay about the their national culture and the U.S. Below are the steps and materials that I use during the week.

  1. Culture Intro. Students discuss pictures of different greetings from around the world. This leads to a discussion of visible and invisible culture (see worksheet ‘Culture_Intro_Greetings’). Students do a hands-on sorting activity in which they think about the iceberg metaphor of visible and invisible culture.
  2. Compare/Contrast Language. Students brainstorm similarities and differences between their school now and another school. Since my students are all going to Diablo Valley College, we use that and our school. Students then work with compare/contrast connectors (see worksheet Compare_Contrast_Connectors) and review using a Quizlet set.
  3. Country Statistics (Quantifiers). Students work on quantifiers (Ex. almost all, most, many, etc) by making guesses about the U.S. and then discussing their own countries (see worksheet Quantifier_Introduction)
  4. Culture Dimensions Introduction. Students read a simplified description of the culture dimensions and mark on the scales where they think most people in their country would fall and where they feel they are on the scale. I usually assign this as HW. Then they discuss it the next day in class (see worksheet Cultural_Dimensions_Intro).
  5. Introduce Hofstede’s Charts. After students have thought about the culture dimension scales on their own, I hand out charts from Hoftstede’s website that compares their national culture with that of the U.S. These charts can be produced using the free tool on Hofstede’s website.

I print them out beforehand and hand them out so that students can discuss whether they agree or disagree with Hofstede’s results by giving examples to support their ideas. I model this by explaining my ideas about the Power Distance dimension as I thought about the U.S. and India (I spent a year studying in India when I was in college). I tell the students that initially I thought the U.S. would be lower on the Power Distance scale because we value equality so much, but then I thought about how normal it is to ask people about their jobs and where they went to school or where they live. The answers to those questions create a kind of hierarchy of power and privilege, so maybe the U.S. isn’t as egalitarian as it seems to be.

6. Intro Compare/Contrast Essay. After the discussion, I hand out the compare/contrast essay prompt (see worksheet Culture_Writing_Prompt), which asks them to write an essay in which they answer the question: Overall, is your culture more similar to or different from that of the U.S.? The prompt also includes a guide for how to organize the body paragraphs and sample body paragraphs from my essay comparing India and the U.S. (see Sample_Culture_Essay to see a very strong student essay)

7. Intro Hofstede Website. In addition to the charts, Hofstede’s website produces reports that discuss each dimension for the national cultures that are selected. Students can use parts of this report as ‘references’ (i.e. evidence) to support their body paragraphs. I usually do an in-class demonstration of how to use the website and also have a screen capture video on my website. 

 

Overall, this unit can help students take a much deeper look at cultural differences and move beyond the more obvious visible differences such as greetings, clothing, and customs. While those can be fascinating, it is often the hidden beliefs and values that most challenge students who are living or studying in the U.S. In addition, students often develop a deeper awareness of their own culture as they go through this process of reading and writing.

January 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Here’s What I’m Doing In 2017 & What You Can Look Forward To Reading About Here

It’s a good time to start thinking about 2017, and I thought readers might be interested in hearing what they can expect to see in this blog over the coming months:

* Katie Hull Sypnieski and I are writing our third book together on teaching English Language Learners.  It’s going to be another long, and useful, one.  Look for it in early 2018 and I’ll post updates during this calendar year.

* I’ll continue to write periodic posts for the New York Times Learning Network (see All My NY Times Posts For English Language Learners – Linked With Descriptions) and weekly ones for my Education Week Teacher advice column.

* I’ll continue to do weekly ten-minute radio shows with BAM! (see All My BAM Radio Shows – Linked With Descriptions).

* I’ll continue to write quarterly columns for Teaching English – British Council on…teaching ELLs.

* I’ll continue to periodically write about education policy issues at The Washington Post.

* I’ll continue to share resources at my Engaging Parents In School blog.

* I have a fairly lengthy article appearing in the March issue of ASCD Educational Leadership that will have a slightly different take on “personalized learning.” You can see my past pieces in that publication here.

* As regular readers know, in addition to teaching high school full-time,  I teach a class to credential candidates at California State University, Sacramento.  That course on teaching English Language Learners will continue next semester, and I hope to write more about the experience here. I’ll also be teaching a class for the first time on Content Literacy to teacher candidates at California State University, Davis.

* And I’ll continue to post resources/commentary here and write about my teaching English and Social Studies to English Language Learners, and about teaching my IB Theory of Knowledge classes.

All this, plus family and playing basketball, should keep me busy and out of trouble 🙂 in 2017!

December 31, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Three Good “Bloom’s Taxonomy According To…” Videos Using Movie Scenes

The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom is the all-time most popular post at this blog.

Some of the most student-friendly resources there are videos using movie scenes to teach the different levels of Bloom’s.

Here are three more of them (actually, I’ve had links to the Seinfeld and Harry Potter versions, but the embedding option had been disabled until recently – the Inside Out version is a new one):

December 27, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Additions To Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups

Here are new additions to The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2016:

This Year’s Most Popular Q & A Posts! is from My Education Week Teacher column.

The Teaching Profession in 2016 (in Charts) is from Ed Week Teacher.

Top Education Stories of 2016: Education Week’s Most Viewed

The Teacher Channel’s Most Watched Videos of 2016

Communications, Stakeholder Engagement & Standards: Our Top Content of 2016 is from The Learning First Alliance.

Ten Issues Capturing the Minds of Educators and Parents This Year is from KQED MindShift.

Top Education Commentaries of 2016: Education Week’s Most-Viewed

Education Myths to Leave Behind in 2016 — 8 Dearly Held Beliefs That Aren’t Necessarily True is by Matt Barnum (I’ve got questions about one or two of them, though).

For a UK perspective: Rhodes, rent strikes and Brexit: the top student stories of 2016 and Our top 10 Secret Teachers of 2016 are from The Guardian.

December 27, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two

 

Another day, another end-of-year “The Best…” list…..

I’m adding this post to All My 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place.

Ordinarily, I also publish a separate list for ELL students, but just didn’t have it in me to do that this month.  You can see links to all those past posts at The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2015 – Part Two.  I’ve included resources that I would ordinarily put in that list in this post, instead.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers of ELLs in 2016 – So Far

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2015 – So Far

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of English Language Learners

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2013 – So Far

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2012 — Part One

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2011 — Part One

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s — 2010

The Best Sites For Teachers Of English Language Learners — 2009

Here are my choices for The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2016 – Part Two:

EFL Talks has lots of useful videos for ELL teachers.  I’m adding it to  The Best Places For ESL/EFL/ELL Teachers To Get Online Professional Development.

Ask Answer Add – A Speaking Activity to Help Learners Maintain a Natural Conversation is a great strategy to get students talking. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English.

Bilingual education is making a comeback in California. But some educators say the fight is just beginning is from The L.A. Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Multilingual Education Act Ballot Initiative In California.

Special Education and English Language Learners is from Colorin Colorado. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Assisting ELLs With Special Needs – Help Me Find More.

10 Assumptions to Rethink About English-Language Learners is by Anabel Gonzalez and appeared in Ed Week.

How We Teach English Learners: 3 Basic Approaches is from NPR.

Using CBMs for Quick Assessment of Progress in English Language Development is a useful article by Rita Platt and John Wolfe about fluency assessments for ELLs. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Reading Fluency (Including How To Measure It).

“CommonLit” Now Lets Teachers Create Free Virtual Classroomswas a piece I posted last month. Now, they’ve announced some great additions for ELLs, including having texts read aloud and providing translation.

Many Reclassified ELLs Still Need English-Language Support, Study Finds is from Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Ins & Outs Of Reclassifying ELLs.

ESSA’s impact on English Language Learners: What we know so far is from ELLevation. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning How The Every Student Succeeds Act Affects English Language Learners.

Teach ELLs to Deconstruct Writing Prompts is by Tan Huynh.

Teachers Should Have Say on When Students Exit ELL Status, Guidance Argues is an Education Week article about a new report from the Council of Chief State School Officers. If offers good, common sense advice, which means (according to my cynical side) that many districts won’t follow it.  I’m adding it The Best Resources For Learning About The Ins & Outs Of Reclassifying ELLs.

Lessonpick is a new resource site for ELL lesson plans.

Spelling races with mini-whiteboards is from ELT Planning. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom.

How non-English speakers are taught this crazy English grammar rule you know but have never heard of is from Quartz.

10 Characteristics of Highly Effective EF/SL Teachers is from TESOL.

David Deubelbeiss has made two hundred videos, along with accompanying hand-outs for ELLs, available for free. I’m adding the link to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL.

The Supporting English Language Learners page at Learn Alberta is a treasure trove of resources. I’m adding their Writing Samples page to The Best Websites For K-12 Writing Instruction/Reinforcement. Kindergarten to Grade 12 English as a Second Language Literature Review Update (up to 2009) is also from that site, and I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Keep-Up With Current ELL/ESL/EFL News & Research.

Personalised speaking is from The British Council. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English.

The Seven Best Short Animated Films for the Language Classroomis from Kieran Donaghy. I’m adding it to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL.

Six Ways I Use Mini Whiteboards in the Classroom is by “AnthonyTeacher.”

Getting Student Feedback is from Anthony Teacher. It talks about an interesting Say/Does reading strategy. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “Close Reading” — Help Me Find More.

My favourite end of term activities is from Lesson Plans Digger. I’m adding it to What Do You Do On The Last Day Of Class (Part Two)?

This tweet leads to a great collection! I’m adding it to The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom:

ELD Teacher Carol Salva has created this excellent video for volunteers working with ELLs. I’m having my student peer tutors watch it! Thanks to Tan Huynh for the tip.

The Best Resources For Helping ELLs Learn About Sports & Other Fun Activities

Simple & Fun Lesson For ELLs Of All Ages: Writing & Recording A Letter To Santa Claus

7 Tips to Implement Culturally Responsive Teaching is geared specifically for ELLs. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About “Culturally Responsive Teaching” & “Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy” – Please Share More!

My New BAM Radio Show Is On Using ELLs Home Language In The Classroom

Learn a New Lingo While Doing Something Else is the headline of an article in Scientific American today about a new study. It basically says that you’ll improve your new language skills just by having the audio in the background even if you’re not explicitly listening.

Tube Wizard is an intriguing site that automatically creates multiple listening quizzes from subtitled YouTube videos. I don’t think it will be useful in many U.S. public schools because Web content filters would block many of the videos, but it could be very helpful for home practice and in adult schools. I’m adding it to The Best YouTube Channels For Learning English.  You might also want to read a post by Olya Sergeeva which explains the site in more detail.

1 WORKSHEET – 10 GAMES is by SVETLANA KANDYBOVICH. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom.

The Best Resources On Supporting Long-Term English Language Learners

Why Did My History Lesson Go So Well Yesterday?

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2016 – Part Two

The Best Scaffolded Writing Frames For Students

Overlooked elements of language and literature play a key role is the headline of an article about what seems to me a fairly arcane study.

However, this statistic jumped out at me:

it-is-apparent-that-in

It seems to me that this kind of info would be heartening news for anyone learning a new language, including English!

Ways A Mainstream Teacher Can Support An ELL Newcomer In Class

“Five Guidelines For Effective Classroom Management” Is My New British Council Post

The Mannequin Challenge, ELLs & A Frozen Tableau

My Latest British Council Post Is On “Critical Thinking”

My New British Council Post is On Student Strategies for self assessment

The Best Places Where Students Can Tell Their – And/Or Their Families – Immigration Story

The Best Posts On Looking At Our Students Through The Lens Of Assets & Not Deficits

The Best Resources For Learning About Total Physical Response (TPR)

“All-Time” Best Web Tools For English Language Learners

Here Are The Instructions I Give Mentors To Our ELLs – Help Me Make Them Better

Two Quick Examples Of Concept Attainment

“Caption Generator” Lets You Create Your Own Captions For Any YouTube Videos – Perfect For ELLs!

Here’s A Simple Lesson On Prehistoric Cave Paintings I Did With My ELL World History Class

Resource Links For ELL Professional Development

Here’s How We Modified The Picture Word Inductive Model Today

Twitter List For ESL/ELL Teachers Growing Fast – Let Me Know If I Should Add You!

Here Are Downloadable Scaffolded Instructions For Students To Create A “3/2/1” Poster

This Is The Revised & Updated Three-Day 9/11 Lesson I Did This Week (With Hand-Outs & Links)

Excellent Ideas On Using Photos In Lessons

Big News: EFL Classroom 2.0 Is Now Entirely Free!

“eLesson Inspirations” Is An Excellent Collection Of Critical Thinking Lessons For ELLs

This Would Be Great For ELLs: Play – Or Create – A “Listening & Speaking” Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Story

“Guess What!” Is A Great “New” Game – Plus, ELLs Can Create A Video For An Authentic Audience

“American English” Site From U.S. Department Of State Has Developed Into Great Resource For ELL Teachers

Every Teacher Who Has An ELL In Their Class Should Watch This “Immersion” Film

December 27, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Articles (& Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2016 – Part Two

 

I continue these end-of-year “The Best…” lists…

I’m adding this post to All My 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might want to explore The Best Resources On Class Instruction In 2016 – Part Two, too.

The title of this “The Best…” list is pretty self-explanatory. What you’ll find here are blog posts and articles this year (some written by me, some by others) that were, in my opinion, the ones that offered the best practical advice and resources to teachers this year — suggestions that can help teachers become more effective in the classroom today or tomorrow. Some, however, might not appear on the surface to fit that criteria, but those, I think, might offer insights that could (should?) inform our teaching practice everyday.

For many, the headlines provide enough of an idea of the topic and I haven’t included any further description.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2016 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2014 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2013 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers In 2011

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers — 2010

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers — 2009

In addition, you might find these useful:

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice In 2011

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice — 2010

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice — 2009

Here are my choices for The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2016- Part Two:

The Best Professional Development Resources On Writing Instruction

Too Many Students and Not Enough Time is good post from Edutopia on differentiated instruction. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

The Best Resources On “The Danger Of A Single Story”

Very Useful NY Times Video Series On Implicit Bias

Teaching Resources On Fake News – Part Three

Study Finds Lecturing Not Best Way To Teach – Shocking (NOT!)

Google Translate Dramatically Expands Recent Breakthrough

“‘Great Field Trips Expand the Mind’”

Video: “How the ‘IKEA effect’ can motivate people to work [& learn] harder”

I was honored to be interviewed by Vicki Davis on “How Skilled Teachers Cultivate Self-Motivated Students.” It’s a quick eleven-minute show….

Guest Post: “Inquiry” vs. “Diagnostic” Frameworks For Writing Assessments

How to Integrate Growth Mindset Messages Into Every Part of Math Class is from MindShift. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

How To Ensure Students Are Actively Engaged and Not Just Compliant is from MindShift. I’m adding it to The “Best” Lists Of Recommendations About What “Effective” Teachers Do.

Big New – & Useful – Federal Report Out Today On Helping Students Develop Self-Regulation Skills

Statistic Of The Day: Less Physical Activity For Boys Equals Less Academic Achievement

Educators’ Favorite Tech Tools is the headline of one of my Education Week Teacher columns. In it, Anna Bartosik, Jared Covili, Sam Patterson, Anabel Gonzalez, Richard Byrne, and Russel Tarr share suggestions on how to navigate through the ed tech “jungle.”

Responding to Defiance in the Moment is from Responsive Classroom. I’m adding it to Best Posts On Classroom Management. Thanks to Chris Wejr for the tip.

5 Ways To Respond To Wrong Answers is from Smart Classroom Management. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On The Idea Of “Wait Time.”

The Best Scaffolded Writing Frames For Students

The Best Ways For Responding To Student Trauma – Help Me Find More

Remembering “Breaking The Plane” Solved My Classroom Problems This Week

“It’s ‘Vital’ for Teachers to ‘Integrate Controversial Topics Into Lessons’”

My New British Council Post is On Student Strategies for self assessment

The Best Resources For Teaching Students About The Dangers Of Procrastination

The Best Ways To Use Multiple Choice Exercises

The Best Resources & Ideas For Teaching About Current Events

A Beginning List Of The Best Resources For Learning About Google Classroom

The Best Resources For “Do Now” Activities To Begin A Class

The Best Posts On Looking At Our Students Through The Lens Of Assets & Not Deficits

The Best Resources On Students Having A “Purpose For Learning”

The Best Resources For Learning About “Learning Strategies”

The Best Resources On The Value Of Positive “Self-Talk”

A Collection Of Advice On Talking To Students About Race, Police & Racism

“Learning Apps” Is One Of The Top Educational Websites Of The Year!

Great Free Resource Available Today – The Performance Assessment Resource Bank

What My Students Say About Teachers Mispronouncing Their Names

Excellent & Simple Three-Step Guide To Classroom Management Challenges

Very Good Interview With Literacy Expert Tim Shanahan

“CommonLit” Now Lets Teachers Create Free Virtual Classrooms

“eMargin” Lets You Annotate Text & Website – & Share Those Annotations

Video: “10 Strategies to Help Students Develop Intrinsic Motivation to Write”

iCivics Steps Up Its Game Big Time With Free Virtual Classrooms & Primary Source Interactive

“Write The World” Provides An Authentic Audience & A Space For Peer Review

“Owl Eyes” Lets Students Read & Annotate, Plus Teachers Can Create Free Virtual Classrooms

“Epic!” Provides 15,000 eBooks, Plus Virtual Classrooms, For Free

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