Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

May 3, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Advice On Protecting Our Digital Info

This post was originally titled “Tech Danger Alert!” but I have since turned it into a “Best” list.

Readers are probably aware of the massive Google Docs Phishing effort going on, but I figured it couldn’t hurt to send this alert – read about it at:

The Google phishing attack: what we know and how it works is from Vox.

Did Someone Just Share a Random Google Doc With You? is from The Atlantic.

Hey: Don’t Click That Weird Google Docs Link You Just Got (and Tell Your Mom Not to Click, Either) is from New York Magazine.

Email Attack Hits Google: What to Do if You Clicked is from The New York Times.

And, while you’re at it, read this new Harvard Business Journal piece, Why You Really Need to Stop Using Public Wi-Fi.

Protecting Your Digital Life in 8 Easy Steps

Public Wi-Fi Users Neglect Basic Security Precautions Against Hackers is from NBC News.

Free Wi-Fi Doesn’t Mean Safe Wi-Fi, And Neither Does Having the Password is from NBC News.

April 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Is Intriguing – Now Anyone Can Create A Class In Google Classroom

Last month, Google began letting people use Google Classroom even if they didn’t have G Suite for Education accounts.

Now, today, you can create your own class on Google Classroom just by having a personal Google acccount.

That creates a lot possibilities. Google itself in their announcement talks about adult education classes, after-school classes and other school groups.

It could also be very useful for educator professional development such as book discussions.

You can also read more about it at TechCrunch: Google Classroom now lets anyone school anyone else

I’m adding this info to A Beginning List Of The Best Resources For Learning About Google Classroom.

April 12, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Speak To Go” Could Be A Fun Tool For A Student-Centered Geography Lesson

Speak To Go is a new VR experiment from Google that lets users of Google Cardboard say the name of any landmark or address and then be able to view a 360 image of the location.

You can also use it online without a Cardboard Headset.

I’ve previously shared our experiments with VR (see Everything You Wanted To Know About How We’re Using Virtual Reality With ELLs, But Were Afraid To Ask) . I could see having students explore wherever they want some day and then explain and describe where they visited and why.  Plus, it’s great pronunciation practice for English Language Learners.

Thanks to TechCrunch for the tip.

I’m adding this info to A Beginning List Of The Best Resources On Virtual Reality In Education.

March 26, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Everything You Wanted To Know About How We’re Using Virtual Reality With ELLs, But Were Afraid To Ask

I’ve previously shared a bit about our experiments with virtual reality (see A Beginning List Of The Best Resources On Virtual Reality In Education). 

Mary Stokke, a very talented student teacher, has “taken the ball and run with it” recently while she has taught a group of Intermediate English Language Learners (my classes are often comprised of multi-level ELLs and, when possible, student teachers work with small groups of them).

Here’s a guest post from her where she talks about initial experiments viewing virtual reality videos and photos to student creating their own. It’s now leading to ELLs teaching mainstream media classes in the school how to create virtual reality videos of the school.

Note that she has some questions for readers at the end of the post.  Please contribute your responses in the comments section if you can help.

Mary Stokke Vides is a new English and Social Science teacher, studying at Sacramento State. She was union organizer for 8.5 years:

I have been working in Larry Ferlazzo’s Intermediate English class for seven months. It is a great opportunity to try out new methods and be creative, because it is a very small class (it started with three students and has grown to seven).  Larry purchased durable VR headsets months ago, and we attempted to view 360 videos with them, but had a poor wifi connection and frankly hadn’t yet put a lot of time into figuring out how using the headsets added value to our instruction.

Later this year, our school’s innovative Digital Media teacher John Hull lent us our school’s only RICOH Theta S 360 degree camera to help us create our own images. We have been excited for the potential of this technology and looking for opportunities to try it out (and not waste Larry’s money). I thought that a good chance to do this again would be in our Persuasive Essay unit, as VR lends itself to taking a perspective.

More than just a novelty, I have found 360 media to be a great way for students to build empathy by immersing themselves in someone else’s story, like the children of this mother who is in hiding to avoid deportation.

Below you will find descriptions of the lessons that I created, and some of the results. There are some challenges to making this technology accessible to students through school, so feedback from technically inclined readers in the comments would be greatly appreciated!

 

Persuasion Lesson Plan Using 360 Technology

Evaluating & Creating 360 Photos

    1. Students wrote a prediction about what they thought the qualities of a good 360 photo would be using a graphic organizer. 
    2. Students viewed 360 photos on the app Roundme. We explored the map function of this app and students played around with different photos before we examined this photo together. 
    3. Students then revised their predictions based on what they saw. 
    4. Next, students shared what they wrote and created a list of what makes a good versus a bad 360 photo. 
    5. Next, we created our own photos. I borrowed some clothing props (hats, jackets, a bathrobe) from our drama teacher, Mr. McElheney and students had fun going out to the school stadium in their new attire. 
    6. Students created 360 photos that we uploaded via Google Street View. Here’s a sample:

The entire lesson plan link is here.

Results: Students enjoyed going outdoors to take photos. They debriefed their results as “good” or “so-so” because their pictures had an interesting background and people doing things, but as one student said, you don’t know what the people are doing, and some parts of the picture are blurry. If I did this again, I’d give students more specific prompts for the elements of the story they are trying to tell. Some words or captions would also be a good way to get students to write during this assignment, and make the purpose of the photo more clear to the audience.

Resources for viewing 360 photos and videos:

  • NYT Daily 360: This site has beautifully produced 360 degree videos on current news topics. They are especially good at producing pieces that allow students to explore an interesting landscape or experience a new perspective, like a brief narrative from a woman who faced xenophobic hatred on the subway in New York, or a view from the crowd at a huge free rural health clinic in Tennessee. In my experience, it’s actually easier to load and view this videos through the YouTube app at the New York Times Daily 360 channel rather than the NYT VR app when you have a slow internet connection.

  • Facebook now allows you to post and view 360 degree photos. There are some amazing images of man-made and natural wonders on the page 360 Photos that would be great for geography classes. The great thing about this site, and Roundme (used in the plan above) is that the images can be viewed well in a VR viewer or right on your desktop or tablet.
  • The Google Cardboard app and Google Streetview also are good resources for viewing still images of interesting places all over the world.

 

360 Video Creation

My English students read the book about a young teen who joins a gang, called “It Doesn’t Have to be This Way/No tiene que ser asi” by Luis J. Rodriguez.  After reading, they wrote a brief essay evaluating why some people say gangs have positive or negative consequences, and then explaining their own opinion about the consequences of joining gangs. I thought a great way to expand this lesson to give students chances to listen, speak, write, and collaborate was to figure out how to create 360 degree skits about questions related to gangs.

My lesson plan with links to different scaffolding documents (Storyboard, setting, dialogue, etc.) to help students prepare sketches is here.

Here are two of the videos that they came up with:

If they look strange on your browser, you will have better luck viewing them on your phone through the YouTube app.

Results: Students were highly engaged in this activity. They were creative, and had fun. They were motivated to write the elements of their videos, plan their props, practice their acting, and help one another record.

Their feedback:

  • Here are the notes students typed up as we debriefed the lesson as well as the agenda we created for teaching other students about the lesson.

Next steps:

  • Frontload some vocabulary activities before making the video and ask students to use some of those words in their skit. 
  • Use a microphone and teach students to add captions on YouTube (I did it this time) so they get practice creating videos that are more engaging and comprehensible to an audience. 
  • Students are going teach what they learned to Mr. Hull’s yearbook class to inform an experiment with creating a 360 digital yearbook to go with the print copy.

Technical Practices for 360 photos and video

Uploading photos:

  • The Google Street View app is a great tool for this. An important thing to do is pair your smartphone with your RICOH Theta S before you take photos. That way you can use the photo editor. Make sure to hit the wifi button on your camera and then go to your phone setting and select the camera’s wifi connection as your wifi source. It will be a name that includes the word “ricoh” or “theta” and a lot of digits. Once you do this, you can go to Google Street View on your smartphone, select the camera icon, and as you take photos with the Ricoh camera, you’re able to view them on your phone, make edits, and upload the photos.

  • The great thing about the Street View app is that it can detect faces and blur them out for anonymity.
  • Uploading photos on the Theta S smartphone app also allows you to blur photos, but as far as I can tell, you can only share photos to Facebook, not save them to your phone or another location.

Shooting, editing and uploading videos:

  • 360 videos need to be uploaded to spherical format in order to appear on Youtube to be compatible with Google Cardboard or other VR viewers. This format also makes it possible for you to watch the video on your desktop in Youtube on a flat screen where you can drag the cursor in order to navigate to different views within the video.
  • The RICOH company offers a variety of applications for editing and sharing photos and videos for phones and desktops. However, the desktop doesn’t seem to allow you to do a spherical conversion. As a result, I had to download 2 smartphone apps from the company, the “Theta S” app and the “THETA+ Video” app. First, I had to upload a video from the camera to the Theta S app (by connecting through the device’s wifi as by hitting the wifi button on the camera and then selecting the camera’s wifi connection as my wifi source). Then, I had to open the THETA+ Video app and select the video format 360 video in the app. In this app you can add filters and trim the video or edit it’s frame speed. Finally, you can upload this video to your Youtube account.
  • In YouTube, you can add captions to your video by going to the “Subtitles/CC” tab in your editing settings. Happily, the captions carry over into a VR viewer like Google Cardboard.

Materials we used:

360 camera, Camera mount (we put it on a borrowed hard hat),VR viewer (for viewing the final product), and a smartphone.

Questions for readers:

  • Is there a way to upload 360 videos into a desktop computer and convert them to the spherical view needed for VR viewers so students could edit these videos in a computer lab?
  • What kinds of lessons have you done using 360 cameras? Do find it adds value in the classroom above simply viewing or taking pictures and videos?

March 26, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Sideways Dictionary” Explains Tech Through Analogies & Lets You Contribute Your Own

Sideways Dictionary explains lots of technology concepts through analogies and invites readers to contribute their own.

It’s a great site for a number of reasons.  One, it can help anyone more easily understand tech terms.  Second, it’s a nice tool to teach about analogies, which are exceptional tools for promoting knowledge transfer (see The Best Resources For Learning About The Concept Of “Transfer” — Help Me Find More and The real stuff of schooling: How to teach students to apply knowledge).

Finally, it’s a another place where students can write for an authentic audience (see The Best Places Where Students Can Write For An “Authentic Audience”).

It would be wonderful if there was a similar site that was not just limited to analogies for tech concepts but, instead, had a broader list of fields (political ideologies, scientific and math concepts, etc.).  I couldn’t find any doing a quick search.  Anyone else know of one?

February 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

A Beginning List Of The Best Resources On Virtual Reality In Education

See Everything You Wanted To Know About How We’re Using Virtual Reality With ELLs, But Were Afraid To Ask

My student teachers and I have been making some initial attempts at trying out Google Cardboard with my English Language Learner students (I bought a few plastic ones from IMCardboard – the actual cardboard ones are just too flimsy for my high school classroom).

Unfortunately, the WiFi doesn’t seem up to the task of streaming VR videos. Until we work out that problem, we’re going to experiment with using photos.  One lesson we’re planning to try is to write up a list of the elements that make-up a good VR photo, explore two of them, and then have students write a short argument essay about which one is better (we’re in the middle of an argument essay unit).  Of course, we could do the same exercise with regular photos, but I suspect engagement will be higher doing it this way.

After that experiment is complete, we’ll start using it in our World and U.S. History classes.  I’m still trying to figure out what value-added benefit it gives if we can’t access the VR videos.  All suggestions are welcome (we also have a camera that can take 360 photos, and I’m trying to figure out how we can use that, too).

In the meantime, I thought it would be useful to bring together my past posts about Virtual Reality in education, along with new resources I’ve been collecting.  Feel free to offer your own suggestions.

You might also be interested in  The Best Resources For Organizing & Maximizing Field Trips – Both “Real” & “Virtual”

Here’s what I have so far:

Google Rolls-Out The Coolest Way – Ever – For Students To Take Virtual Field Trip

20 Best VR Apps for Google Cardboard from MakeUseof looks interesting.

Is virtual reality ready for school? is from Brookings.

Reader Idea | New York Times Virtual Reality in the Classroom is from The New York Times Learning Network.

5 Apps to Use with Google Cardboard is from Class Tech Tips.

Ripping Learning off the Page is from Edutopia.

Teachers eye potential of virtual reality to enhance science instruction is from Ed Source.

Coincidentally, later today, Richard Byrne is hosting a Google Hangout on this very topic. If you can’t make it, I assume it will be archived (it is, and you can find it here).

Kathy Schrock has a nice collection of resources.

9 Must-Have Virtual Reality Tools for Teaching with Google Cardboard is from Class Tech Tips.

Virtual Reality Could Transform Education as We Know It is from Ed Week.

Future Ready: VR, AR, and MR in the classroom beyond the novelty is by Micah Shippee.

“Speak To Go” Could Be A Fun Tool For A Student-Centered Geography Lesson

Google Unveils Virtual Reality Tours Related To Alexander Hamilton

Embed 360° photos and Virtual Reality (VR) Content is from Edublogs.

IATEFL presentation : Virtual Reality in the EFL Class is from IATEFL.

Using virtual reality to step into others’ shoes is from The Hechinger Report.

Tips For Getting Started With 360° Photos And Virtual Reality (VR) Content is by Sue Waters.

Augmented Reality vs. Virtual Reality – What’s the Difference? is from Voice of America.

Augmented Reality vs. Virtual Reality is from Richard Byrne.

Video: Google Expeditions Announces New Augmented Reality Program For Schools

Google opens Expeditions VR education app to the public is from TechCrunch.

5-Minute Film Festival: Teaching With 360-Degree Videos is from Edutopia.

How to Create Virtual Reality Panoramas is from Richard Byrne.

December 14, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Google Translate Dramatically Expands Recent Breakthrough

Two months ago, I posted about a Google announcement that they had made a breakthrough in improving Google Translate (Google Says They Just Achieved A Huge Breakthrough In Machine Translation) and that they expected to roll changes out among its languages.

It looks like they might have accelerated those changes, and you can read all about it in a massive New York Times article published today, The Great A.I. Awakening.

Here’s an excerpt:

translate-had-been

The improvements seem absolutely amazing.

The Times article goes into excruciating detail about how the changes have been achieved. To be honest, I’m less interested in the “how” and more interested in its reality. It just makes it so much easier to ELL teachers to communicate with parents and with newcomer students!

I’m adding this info to The Best Sites For Learning About Google Translate & Other Forms Of Machine Translation.

November 15, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The New “PhotoScan” By Google Is One Of The Most Useful Apps I’ve Ever Seen

googlescan

The new PhotoScan app from Google, for both Android and iPhone, lets you easily convert your old “paper” photos into high-resolution digital images.

I know one thing I’ll be doing over Thanksgiving break.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Beginning iPhone Users Like Me, which needs a big revision and update.

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