Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

February 12, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Next ELT Blog Carnival Coming Up!

As I’ve previously mentioned, after 31 editions of ESL/EFL/ELL Blog Carnival, it was time for it to be refreshed. So I’ve worked with other bloggers to “re-brand” it as The ELT Blog Carnival and it now has its own permanent site!

You can see links to all previous Carnivals there, along with plans for future ones.

Here’s the announcement for the next Carnival:

The next ELT Blog Carnival will be hosted by EFL Classroom 2.0 on March 01.

You can send your entry HERE or directly to [email protected]

The Theme for this month’s carnival is

Using Your Students’ Lives: Personalizing Your Teaching.

The site also has this announcement about future hosts:

Want to host a blog carnival on your blog? Please contact us! We hope to have blog carnivals each month and hosting on your own blog will help share so many valuable blog posts written each month by teachers all over the world.

Check it out!

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December 16, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More On Sandy Hook

October 30, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Only Two Days Left To Contribute To The Next ESL/EFL/ELL Blog Carnival!

Adam Simpson is hosting the 31st ESL/EFL/ELL Blog Carnival over at his blog, One Year In The Life Of An English Teacher.

He’s asking people to leave a comment there sharing ‘a blog post you want more people to read.’

You can also send it to him here or send it to me.

Please do it by November 1st.

Let me know if you might be interested in hosting future editions.

You can see all the previous editions of the ESL/EFL/ELL Blog Carnival here.

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October 12, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Special Edition Of “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”

(Usually, I just post a weekly version of this regular feature. However, sometimes I post an extra “Special Edition” when I have more good links than usual)

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here is a Special Edition of “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

EDUBLOGS TEACHER CHALLENGES is from Edublogs. I’m adding it to The Best Sources For Advice On Student Blogging.

‘Beam Us Up, Mr. Scott!’: Why Misquotations Catch On is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Places To Find Quotations On The Web.

Top 10 Tips For Better iPhone Photos has useful advice. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Beginning iPhone Users Like Me.

Dropbox: A Superb Classroom Tool is from PLP. I’m adding it to
The Best Resources For Maximizing The Use Of Dropbox.

Documentary seeks to explain why Albanians saved Jews in Holocaust is from CNN. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The Holocaust.

A Brief History Of Computers That Changed The World is from Make Use Of. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The History Of Technology.

12 Ways to Know if You’re in a Project-Based Learning Environment or Merely Having Kids Create Projects in Your Classroom provides helpful advice. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

On Students’ Needs And Team Learning: A Conversation With William Glasser is an oldie but goodie.

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September 23, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Use “Nulu” To Learn Spanish

Nulu is a relatively new site for learning Spanish. You can pick a variety of news stories to have read to you, and the English translation is shown. You can also easily create flash cards for words that you want to study.

Unfortunately, it’s all text-based and has no visuals. It has potential, but I don’t feel like I can add it to The Best Sites For Learning Spanish Online.

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August 14, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

If Math Is Basketball, Let Students Play The Game is by Dan Meyer, and is just a very thoughtful commentary on teaching and applicable to all subjects. His comments can be applied to some recent additions I’ve made to The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom questioning whether students have to start at lower levels of thinking in order to “build-up” to the higher ones, so I’m adding it to that list.

12 Essential Social Media Cheat Sheets is from Mashable. I’m adding it to The Best Places To Learn Web 2.0 Basics.

California Works on New English-Language Development Standards is from The Learning The Language blog at Ed Week. It includes some important information about the next generation of language testing, so I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Next Generation” Of State Testing.

New online tests hold promise, perils is from The Hechinger Report. I’m adding it to the same list.

The Story Behind the First Photograph Ever Posted on the Web is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The History Of Technology.

Stephanie Cook has a good Pinterest Board for iPads. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Beginning iPad Users.

Five Key TED Talks is from The New Yorker. I’m adding it to The Best Teacher Resources For “TED Talks” (& Similar Presentations).

Back to knowledge: The Ironic Path of Teaching Thinking is by Dr. Yoram Harpaz. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Teaching & Learning Critical Thinking In The Classroom.

Three Steps for Improving Teacher Questions is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions.

Study: For-profit college degrees don’t help grads earn more is from The Washington Post. It includes some important information, so I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career.

The Tallest Building in the World is an interactive from The Wall Street Journal. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About The World’s Tallest Buildings.

Celebrate Summer: 10 Ways to Teach the Season is from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The Summer.

Here are some other regular features I post in this blog:

“The Best…” series (which now number over 900)

Best Tweets of The Month

The most popular posts on this blog each month

My monthly choices for the best posts on this blog each month

Each month I do an “Interview Of The Month” with a leader in education

Periodically, I post “A Look Back” highlighting older posts that I think are particularly useful

The ESL/EFL/ELL Blog Carnival

Resources that share various “most popular” lists useful to teachers

Interviews with ESL/EFL teachers in “hot spots” around the world.

Articles I’ve written for other publications.

Photo Galleries Of The Week

Research Studies Of The Week

Regular “round-ups” of good posts and articles about school reform

This Week In Web 2.0

Around the Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

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