Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

August 16, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: ‘Don’t Look Down At Me”

From Laughing Squid:

In Don’t Look Down on Me, little person filmmaker Jonathan Novick used a button camera to demonstrate how people in New York City react to his appearance. The resulting footage, which included inappropriate questions, offensive statements and surreptitious picture taking, along with some very insightful first-person narration make up this wonderful short documentary.

The most powerful part of the video begins at the 4:00 mark.

I’m adding this to The Best Sites For Walking In Someone Else’s Shoes.

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August 13, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Videos: Nemo Demonstrates “Transfer Of Learning”

Thanks to reader Pam Pryer, here is an excellent example of transfer of learning demonstrated by everybody’s favorite fish, Nemo.

In the first video, he learns what “swimming down” can do and, in the second, he uses that knowledge to save hundreds of other fish.

I’m adding the two clips to The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning.”

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August 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Nice Listing Of Educational Videos Available For Streaming Through Netflix & Amazon

The Fordham Institute has completed a useful listing of history, science and literature educational videos available for streaming on Netflix and Amazon. It’s organized by topic and is pretty comprehensive.

Some of the films they included are a bit bizarre (“Charlie Brown’s Thanksgiving” in the unit on Native American Cultures? Really?), but most of them seem appropriate.

I’m adding the list to The Best Places To Find Theatrical Movies On Science, Math, & History.

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August 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Videos Of The Week

'Video Clutter' photo (c) 2006, John Pannell - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

In yet another effort to get at my backlog of resources to share, I recently began this feature to share useful videos. I’ll still periodically highlight certain ones on their own, but the rest will be found on this regular post:

Reader Cindy Conser suggested this nice video collection from Shmoop would be a good addition to The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar. Here’s one example:

You may have read about a project to “chart the movement of Western culture over the past 2,000 years.”

Here’s a video animation of the project:

I’m adding it to The Best Resources To See Connections (or Disconnections) In The World Before & After The Internet.

I’m adding this New York Times video about “A Threat to Cambodia’s Sacred Forests” to The Best Sites For International Day Of The World’s Indigenous People:

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August 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: Jimmy Fallon Plays Pictionary

Most people, including ESL/ELT teachers, are familiar with the game Pictionary. It’s a great language-learning activity.

If you ever want to show other teachers or students a video modeling the activity, Jimmy Fallon has you covered:

I’m adding this to The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom.

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August 3, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Videos: Nice Slow-Motion Scenes From Movies Good For English Language Learners

These two compilation videos would be great for English Language Learners — they’re entertaining and in slow motion, so neither they or the teacher has to worry about it going to fast. Students can easily describe what they are seeing.

I think they’re all appropriate for classroom use though have to admit I didn’t get a chance to watch all of either of them.

I’m adding the two clips to The Best Movie Scenes To Use For English-Language Development.

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August 1, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Four Very Good Additional Resources On “Flow”

Boy, there sure are a lot of materials about “Flow” online, and there sure is a dearth of good resources among them.

However, there are a few good ones that I’m adding to The Best Resources For Learning About “Flow”:

Thoughts About Education: Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is from the John Hopkins School of Education.

Here’s an excellent video interview with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. I preferred, though, to read the transcript….

Starting at about the 8:00 mark, you really want to watch this video:

This last video isn’t great, but it’s short and provides a good overview of flow:

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July 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Amazing Video: 1980 Bush & Reagan Comments On If Undocumented Children Should Be Able To Attend Schools

This is amazing.

What has happened to the Republicans?

I’m adding this to The Best Resources About The New Push For Immigration Reform.

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July 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Even More MacGyver Clips Showing “Transfer Of Learning”

I just discovered a MacGyver wiki that has a List of problems solved by MacGyver. It lists all the episodes, along with the problems he solved in each one and how he solved them. In addition, today I discovered that CBS has put all the MacGyver episodes on YouTube.

Based on quick review, here are a few more clips I’m adding to The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning.” I’m sure there are more if you want to take the time to look through the wiki. On some of them, I have included quotes from the wiki. I was originally going to use TubeChop to just share the clips themselves, but it didn’t seem to be working well today. So, I’ve embedded some of the entire episodes with instructions of when to start them:

On this one, the Pilot Episode, “”MacGyver plugs a sulfuric acid leak with chocolate. He states that chocolate contains sucrose and glucose. The acid reacts with the sugars to form elemental carbon and a thick gummy residue (proved to be correct on Mythbusters).” Start at 35:40 and end at 38:20

On this next one, Fire and Ice, “MacGyver opens a vault and steals back some diamonds first dusting the buttons for fingerprints with graphite from a pencil. The vault has a three-digit combination with unique digits and six buttons. The dusting narrows down the 120 combinations to 6 and the vault is easily opened. He then neatly gets the diamonds in a small bag using a paper as a funnel. (31.30) “Math and science do prove useful.” Start at 32:30 and end at 34:15.

Here, “MacGyver created a diversion and a surprise attack using an inner tube, pressured air, chloride, a catalyst, two glass jars and a gas mask. The inflatable boat was put in a truck and filled with air until the glass broke creating a loud noise. Meanwhile MacGyver filled the two gas bombs filling one glass jar with chloride and the other with a catalyst. Then he threw them at the bad guys resulting in a reaction producing toxic chlorine gas when the two liquids mixed. (36.00) When I was a kid my grandpa gave me two things I’ll never forget; a subscription of popular mechanics and a chemistry set. And this place was one BIG chemistry set! – MacGyver” Start at 36:00 and ends at 44:00

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July 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Videos: “Forward Thinking Transfer Of Learning” With James Bond

I promise – this will be my last Transfer of Learning post for the day!

Two kinds of transfers of learning are called “backward-reaching” and “forward-thinking.” In “backward-reaching,” you’re applying what you have previously learned to a new situation — that’s what was demonstrated in the Karate Kid and MacGyver videos I posted earlier today.

In a TEDx talk by Marc Chun about transfer, he talked about James Bond being a good example of “forward-thinking transfer.” In other words, when the scientist Q would give him his deadline gadgets prior to a mission, he would need to think about what situations he might use them in.

Here are some clips of Bond getting those gadgets from Q. The first one is probably the best one. The last two are compilations that include getting the gadgets prior to a mission and using gadgets. Unfortunately, they’re out of order so you might see a clip of him getting one followed by a clip of his using another. Too bad they’re not coordinated.

I’m adding these clips to The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More!

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July 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Videos: MacGyver & Transfer Of Learning

Here are some great MacGyver videos where he demonstrates transfer of learning — he has to remember what he learned in the past and apply that knowledge to entirely new situations in order to save his life. I’m adding these videos to The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning”:

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July 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Videos: The Karate Kid & Transfer Of Learning

Karate_kid

As regular readers know, I’ve been trying to find movie scenes demonstrating transfer of learning (see The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More!).

I happened upon a comment in a paper about transfer saying the Karate Kid was a good example, and they sure were right.

Pat Morita having the kid do a variety of tasks like waxing a car and painting a fence helps him develop skills that he is then able to apply in a totally different situation. If you don’t remember the movie, here is the progression of scenes:

I’m still looking for more suggestions of movie scenes demonstrating transfer, so feel free to make them in the comments.

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