Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

November 1, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: Bloom’s Taxonomy According To Harry Potter

In The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom, which is — by far — the most popular post I’ve ever published, I include videos using Star Wars, Finding Nemo, Pirates of the Caribbean, and other movies to teach Bloom’s.

Here’s another such video, and this one uses scenes from Harry Potter. Unfortunately, it has embedding disabled, so you’ll have to go to the link on YouTube. Of course, I’ll be adding it to that list….

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October 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: “Where Is My Brother?” Is Sad, Moving Music Video About Missing Mexican Student Teachers

You’re probably familiar with the story of the 43 protesting student teachers in Mexico who were kidnapped by police and members of a drug cartel (see Such A Sad & Tragic Story: Student Teachers Murdered In Mexico).

They’re still missing, and a music video using artistic portraits of the missing has just been released. You can read more about it at Vox.

Here’s the video (the song is in Spanish):

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October 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Daniel Pink TV Show – Here Are Some Video Clips From It

crowdcontrol

Daniel Pink, whom I’ve written about a lot, is hosting a television series that begins in late November on the National Geographic Channel.

It’s called “Crowd Control.”

Here’s how he describes it in his newsletter (which you can subscribe to here):

“Crowd Control” is unlike any other program on TV. We take on problems — from significant ones like airline safety to less significant ones like double-dipping guacamole. Then, using principles of behavioral science, along with some cool design and technology, we go out into the world and try to solve them. In all, we’ve done more than 40 experiments across America — some of which have worked spectacularly, others of which, uh, have not. 

For example, in our first 12 episodes, we’ve:

  • reconfigured a stretch of Route 66 in New Mexico so that the road plays a song when people drive the speed limit; 
  • created a high-tech photo booth to scare sun-loving Jersey shore vacationers into using sun screen;
  • cleaned up Bourbon Street with a giant trivia game;
  • designed a robotic dog to make a New York airport’s baggage claim more tolerable; 
  • and, yes, much, much more.

In some ways, it sounds reminiscent of Fun Theory videos, which I’ve previously described and shared. But I’m sure Dan will be providing his own unique perspectives.

Here are a couple of clips:

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October 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Oddest Video You Will Ever See On Economic Inequality

This animation features the voices of Amy Poehler, Maya Rudolph, Billy Eichner, Andy Richter, and Sarah Silverman and is a parody of My Little Pony that is designed to each about economic equality. Yes, you read that correctly. In addition, the director of Anchorman made it.

You can read the full story behind it, which gets even stranger when you learn that it was financed by billionaire Paul Allen.

In fact, it’s so odd that I don’t think I’ll even add it to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality.

But I think it is interesting, to say the least….

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October 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New TED-Ed Video Is For TOK Teachers: “Is math discovered or invented?”

TED-Ed has just published a video and lesson on the topic, Is math discovered or invented?

This question is one most, if not all, IB Theory of Knowledge teachers deal with when we cover the Math Area of Knowledge.

Unfortunately, the video does not make that question particularly accessible and, in my humble opinion, is not up to TED-Ed’s usual high standards. But I could still see showing at least a portion of it in class.

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October 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Movie Scenes For Halloween

I have lots of Halloween resources (see The Best Websites For Learning About Halloween) and lots of movie scenes useful for English language development (see The Best Movie Scenes To Use For English-Language Development).

With us focusing on Halloween next week in class, I thought I’d put the two together and share some good movie scenes to show students.

The ones here are a combination of scary videos and ones that introduce Halloween-like monsters. Some are too scary for young children.

You can read about how I use these scenes in class at The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them).

I hope readers will contribute additional suggestions:

Lights Out – Who’s There Film Challenge (2013) from David F. Sandberg on Vimeo.

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October 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video Of The Month (If Not The Year): “That Came Natural — I Had To Work To Read”

Bill Ferriter, whose blog has been one of the few on my blog roll for many years (and it should be in your RSS Reader, too), recently shared this video.

I suspect this video will be played far-and-wide among English (and other subject) classrooms (it sure received lots of retweets on Twitter). It’s about a star football player’s engagement with reading.

I’m adding it to The Best Videos & Articles Where Athletes Explain How Reading & Writing Well Has Helped Their Career.

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October 19, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video Clip From “Up The Down Staircase” Shows One Of The Worst Teachers Ever

I watched a great move, Up The Down Staircase, this weekend (I wrote about it last month).

I couldn’t find any video clips that showed the excellent examples of teaching and learning from the movie, but I did find one of one teacher being extraordinarily cruel. It’s a perfect example of how NOT to teach.

I won’t add it to The Best Funny Movie/TV Clips Of Bad Teachers because it’s not funny. I will, however, add the movie to The Best Places To Learn About (And View Video Clips Of) Teachers In The Movies.

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October 12, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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NY Times Learning Network Launches “15-Second Vocabulary Video Contest”

contest

The New York Times Learning Network has just launched its Second Annual 15-Second Vocabulary Video Contest.

It’s a fun and engaging learning activity, and submissions are due November 11th.

When they began the contest a year ago, they used a video one of my English Language Learner students created as a model. I often have my students use Instagram video for vocabulary improvement and for other types of formative assessments. You can see a ton of those examples at The Best Resources For Learning To Use The Video Apps “Vine” & Instagram.

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