Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

February 19, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: “I Am A Ukranian”

'IMG_6209' photo (c) 2013, Sasha Maksymenko - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

In light of what’s happening in Kiev right now, I thought readers might be interested in this English-language video that the protesters made to explain what they’re doing.

For more information about what’s happening right now, you can check out this constantly update page from The New York Times and this updated Associated Press interactive. And here’s a more recent update from The NY Times.

You might also be interested in The Best Sites For Learning About Protests In History.

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February 17, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video (& Writing Prompt): “A failure isn’t a failure if it prepares you for success tomorrow”

John McCarthy shared this short video clip of U.S. Olympic bobsledder Lolo Jones. She begins by sharing her favorite quote (though doesn’t cite the source and I can’t find it online, either):

“A failure isn’t a failure if it prepares you for success tomorrow”

I’m going to show the video to my students, along with writing that quotation on the board. Then, I’ll ask them to respond to this writing prompt:

What is Lolo Jones saying about how we should view failure? What do you think of her view? To develop your position, be sure to include specific examples. These examples can come from the video, anything else you’ve read, and/or your own observations and experiences.

I’m adding this to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures and to My Best Posts On Writing Instruction (where I collect all my writing prompts).

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February 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The #EnglishEffect Videos Are Great, & Perfect For A Class Project

The British Council ran a contest last year called #EnglishEffect.

Here is how they describe it:

Last year the British Council ran a global video competition where people from all over the world sent in videos telling us what English meant to them. The winning video and the others are great for stimulating classroom discussion, and for ideas for making your own.

They are absolutely right about the videos being a good stimulus for class discussion. In many ways, it’s a great companion idea to having students do a “one-sentence project” (see The Best Resources For Doing A “One-Sentence Project”). There, students write a sentence about what they want people to say about them thirty/forty years in the future, and we videotape them.

With the #EnglishEffect, I’m planning on showing some of these videos to my students, and then have them create posters and a video explaining what they hope to gain by learning English. It will work particularly well following a lesson I do on health and financial benefits to being bilingual or multilingual.

Here’s the British Council’s winning entry, followed by an introductory video kicking-off a playlist of others from their contest. You can also see them all on YouTube here.

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February 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The New “Connect With English” Site Has Got To Be One Of This Year’s Best New Sites For ELLs

connect

“Connect With English” was produced by Annenberg a number of years ago, and is a great video series for English Language Learners. The series has been free to watch via the web, but you’ve had to purchase student exercise books. I’ve previously our own “worksheet” that we developed for students to use.

Though the videos are just beginning to show their age a bit, they’re still wonderful resources.

What’s even better, though, is that Annenberg has just unveiled a new free Connect With English site with tons of interactive exercises for students to use. My students will love it, and I’m sure they won’t be alone.

I’m adding info to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them).

Thanks to InterCom for the tip.

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February 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Is A Neat Video On Literacy — Too Bad It’s A Commercial For Whiskey

Amy Erin Borovoy, the amazing video blogger at Edutopia, shared this commercial on Twitter today.

It has a neat focus on literacy, and reminded me a bit of a clip from The Color Purple you’ll find on The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner.

I’d add this video to that list (to help illustrate perseverance), if it wasn’t a commercial for a whiskey. So I won’t show it to students, but I thought readers of this blog might still want to watch it:

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February 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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If You’re Looking For Videos About The Olympics, Here Are The Best Places To Find Them…

'Olympic Rings George Abbot School' photo (c) 2011, Surrey County Council News - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

If you’re looking for online videos about the Sochi Olympics — and, in fact, for previous Olympics — here are what look like the two best places to find them:

Of course, the NBC Olympics site has the exclusive rights to most of the best clips.

And then there’s “The Official YouTube Olympic Channel,” which I assume is controlled by NBC, but I’m not sure. There, you can find many clips about past Olympics, and other videos like these two:

I’ll be adding these to The Best Sites For Learning About The Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games.

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February 3, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: “Sophie’s Choice”

I’m sure most IB Theory of Knowledge teachers use this famous and terrible scene from Sophie’s Choice when discussing ethics and moral dilemmas. However, I realized I never posted it on this blog, and thought it might be useful to others (and to me) to have it here:

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February 2, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Disney Online Video Series: “The American Presidents”

'White House' photo (c) 2005, Chris Christner - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Thanks to Michelle Henry, I learned that Disney has produced a series of short online videos about the U.S. Presidents. The narration isn’t speeded-up, like in many history videos, so they are accessible to English Language Learners.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to find them all online, and have included the ones I could locate in this post. I’m adding this info to The Best Sites To Learn About U.S. Presidents.

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