Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

April 18, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Google Earth Unveils Big Redesign Today

Google unveiled a huge redesign of Google Earth today.

The changes include being now completely browser-based, letting you see the world in 3-D, and providing guided “Voyager” tours.

You can read more about the changes at:

Introducing the New Google Earth, Google Maps Mania

Redesigned Google Earth brings guided tours and 3D view to Chrome browsers and Android devices, The Verge

I’m adding this info to The Best Resources For Google Earth Beginners Like Me, which needs to be updated one of these days…

April 18, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Fifty Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

I’ve previously posted Apple’s New Video-Editing App “Clips” Is Much More…..  For even more related ideas, check out 5 Ways To Use Apple Clips In The Classroom And A Review from ICT Evangelist.

Here are two sites that let you create more arcade-like games: FlowLab, which only lets you create a few games for free, and GameFroot, which seems much more accessible and, as far as I can see, lets you do a lot of creation for free (let me know if I’m wrong on that score, though).

Here’s a video about GameFroot:

I’m not adding either one to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games – they’re just a little too complicated for my taste.

15 Second Book Talks Take 1 is from Colby Sharp. It’s about using Instagram’s new Stories tool for creating book talks. I’ve written a lot about how I use Instagram’s video feature for book talks and other projects (see The Best Resources For Learning To Use The Video Apps “Vine” & Instagram). I hadn’t paid much attention to the Stories feature because I knew it would automatically delete after twenty-four hours. But, after further investigation, I learned that it’s easy to save the videos as permanent.

April 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

“Quiznetic” Lets Teachers Create – & Students Play – Online Racing Games For Learning

Quiznetic is a Kahoot-like tool that lets you create learning games in various racing forms. Students can then “race” each other in answering the questions and see their positions.

It appears to be free, and seems simple to use.

However, they seem to be having some technical issues today so it wouldn’t let me confirm my email address (which is required in order to create a game). (I have since received a message from them saying they fixed that problem)

So I’m not ready to add it to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

Try it out and let me know what you think…

April 12, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Google’s Brand New “AutoDraw” Is Likely To Become A Favorite Place For Those Of Us Who Are Artistically-Challenged

Google just unveiled AutoDraw, a free site that uses artificial intelligence that provides a series of guesses about what you are drawing. You can choose the right “guess” to pretty-up your artistic creation, write up some description, and then download it or share the link. The image above is an example.

This is perfect for English Language Learners – instead of spending tons of time getting their drawing “just right,” they can, instead, have fun drawing quickly and spend more time on the language part of the exercise.

And it’s great for ESL teachers, too – no more working hard trying to draw images of scenes for vocabulary items to support language acquisition. Now just draw a few lines, project it onto the screen, and you’ll be able to show a masterpiece.

I’m adding this info to The Best Art Websites For Learning English.

You can read more about AutoDraw at Technology Review article, Google’s AI Turns Your Crappy Doodles Into Proper Pictures.

Thanks to Greg Toppo for the tip.

April 7, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Fifty Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

I previously posted  “Loopy” Lets You Create Interactive Simulations That Look Cool But I Don’t Really Understand Them. You can find even more similar tools at Explorable Explanations. I’m adding both to The Best Online Learning Simulation Games & Interactives — Help Me Find More, which I just completely updated and revised.

Feedly’s reader app now caters to knowledge workers with launch of boards, notes & annotations is from TechCrunch.

Kupiter lets you easily create Asteroids-like games – without having to register. All you have to do is create some questions. Unfortunately, the answers have to spelled out – so it takes awhile to play. I’m going to try having my English Language Learners use it to develop games for their classmates and see how it goes. It’s a nice tool, but, at this point, not good enough to be added to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games. I learned about Kupiter from Richard Byrne.

Here’s a video about it:

Speaking of Richard Byrne, his post How to Add Spoken Audio to Google Slides could come in very useful.

April 6, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Apple’s New Video-Editing App “Clips” Is Much More….

Apple released a neat new free app called Clips today.

You can read a very good – and detailed – explanation of its features at TechCrunch.

It’s billed as a video-editing tool, and it seems like an excellent and simple one. I’m always on the look-out for one of those since I have my IB Theory of Knowledge students periodically make videos, so Clips definitely gets added to the Not The “Best,” But A List… Of Online Video Editors list.

But it’s much more than just a video-editor.  It has the “stop-action” ability of Instagram video (press to video, stop, press again), it provides flowing text you want to display by recognizing the words you say (a particularly useful tool for English Language Learners) and, even though it’s an Apple product, it’s easy to share videos to whatever platform you want to use.

So, because of those features and others, I’m also adding it to The Best Resources For Learning To Use The Video Apps “Vine” & Instagram.

Note: A few years ago I gave a similarly positive review to another – now defunct – video-editing app also called “Clips.” There appears to be no relationship between the two.

 For even more related ideas, check out 5 Ways To Use Apple Clips In The Classroom And A Review from ICT Evangelist.

April 4, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Resources For National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month.

Here are new additions to The Best World Poetry Day Resources – Help Me Find More:

Here are several tools that let you create poetry online.

Erasures lets you create a version of “Blackout Poetry” online. You can learn more about Blackout Poetry here.

22 Ways to Teach and Learn About Poetry With The New York Times is from The New York Times Learning Network.

20+ Ideas and Resources for Learning with Poetry is from Shelly S. Terrell.

March 28, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Loopy” Lets You Create Interactive Simulations That Look Cool But I Don’t Really Understand Them

Loopy lets you create interactive simulations like the one below – just by drawing.

This is how they describe themselves:

It’s the ancient, time-honored way of learning: messing around and seeing what happens. Play with simulations to ask “what if” questions, and get an intuition for how the system works!

Raw code is too inaccessible. Also drag-and-drop is too mainstream. But with LOOPY, you can model systems by simply drawing circles & arrows, like a wee baby

I don’t quite get it, but I suspect some readers might find it useful. Thanks to Flowing Data for the tip.

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