Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

September 18, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Limnu is a free online collaborative whiteboard that looks pretty good. I’m adding it to The Best Online Tools For Real-Time Collaboration.

The Desmos Guide to Building Great (Digital) Math Activities is by Dan Meyer.

Ixil lets you create a virtual classroom for your students for $250. The activities all seem fairly basic, but it appears to be a fairly popular site among educators. I’m adding it to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

KEEPING YOUR BLOGGING STUDENTS SAFE ONLINE has some very useful info. I’m adding it to The Best Sources For Advice On Student Blogging.

ToonTastic is a neat free iPad app useful for ELLs. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Beginning iPad Users.

Wakelet is another addition to the very crowded resource curation market.  It does seem fairly easy to use, and you can leave notes to the links you save.  Because of those features, I’m adding it to The Best Places To Create (And Find) Internet Scavenger Hunts & Webquests because teachers and students can use it for that activity.

September 10, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

After quickly registering, Marvel Comics lets you create your own comic that you can print, send, or embed. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Make Comic Strips Online.

I’ve previously written about Prisma, free app that lets you turn your photos into manga. When I first learned about it in the spring, I thought it could be a very attractive tool for reluctant writers to use — they could create their own web comics. TechCrunch showed an example.   Recently, NPR published an update on the app.

Ormiboard lets up to four people collaborate on an online whiteboard and is free, at least for now. I’m adding it to The Best Online Tools For Real-Time Collaboration.  Thanks to Shelly Terrell for the tip.

Hstry is a new online tool for creating timelines that’s on The Best Tools For Making Online Timelines list. They’ve recently added the feature of being able to have multiple people collaborate on the same timeline, so I’m also adding it to the collaboration Best list.

Raw Pixel is yet another site where you can download free photos for use. I’m adding it to The Best Online Sources For Images.

I’m not sure if the world really needs another place where educators can curate learning resources, but Learn Cloud is a new tool adding itself to that crowded field.

August 30, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

National Park Service Makes 100,000 Public Domain Photos Available

yosemite

The Open Parks Network has made tens of thousands of images available to the public in a searchable database. Almost all are in the public domain, but there may be a few that don’t have a “Public Domain Mark.”

I’m adding it to The Best Online Sources For Images.

Thanks to Open Culture for the tip.

August 30, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“eMargin” Lets You Annotate Text & Website – & Share Those Annotations

emargin

eMargin is a free tool developed by Birmingham City University in the United Kingdom.

You can upload any text and have students annotate it, and the same text can be annotated by a closed group. In addition, you can “upload” a web address and annotate it, as well. The lay-out can be a bit funky with websites, but it’s still workable.

I’m adding it to Best Applications For Annotating Websites.

August 29, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I’ve recently begun a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Flash Card, Math and Organizer Apps for the 21st Century Student is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Tools To Make Online Flashcards, which I’ve just updated and revised.

WriteReader lets students create their own online books fairly easily. Teachers can create their own virtual classrooms and monitor student progress. It’s free for the next two months but, after that time, they’re going to charge $79 per year for a class of 35 students. I’m going to add it to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

I learned about Genial.ly from Shelly Terrell’s excellent post, Visualizing Learning with Infographics: 23 Resources. Genial.ly seems like a new and useful free tool for creating infographics. I’ve embedded a video about it below, though it’s more flash than substance (the video, that is). I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Creating Infographics.

Elink is a new tool for collecting and curating web resources. For teachers, I think it would be most helpful in creating Webquests or Internet scavenger hunts – you can leave comments about each site you save. I’m adding it to The Best Places To Create (And Find) Internet Scavenger Hunts & Webquests. Here’s a video about it:

August 19, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Zooniverse” Is One Of The Coolest Ed Sites On The Web – I Can’t Believe I’m Just Hearing About It!

zoon

Zooniverse is an amazing site where scholars put up projects that require “people-powered research” – for example, attempting to decode formerly secret Civil War telegrams.

It has many projects in multiple subject areas, along with very cool online tools for students to use when doing the research. The site also has lesson plans for teachers to use when introducing students to the site.

A site like this offers real purposes for student learning. I’m amazed that I hadn’t heard of it before today when Stephen F. Knott sent the tweet about the Civil War project. Further exploration led me to all the site’s other features.

I’m going to add it to Best Places Where Students Can Write For An “Authentic Audience,” but it deserves to be on a lot of other Best lists.

Have any readers had experience with Zooniverse before?  Am I the only one around who didn’t know it existed?

August 19, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I’ve recently begun a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

WebReel lets you create a “reel” – a slideshow – of links to web addresses. You can also write a description of each site in the presentation. It would be an easy tool to use if teachers or students were creating webquests or internet scavenger hunts, which is why I’m adding it to The Best Places To Create (And Find) Internet Scavenger Hunts & Webquests.  It’s still in beta, so you need to request an invitation.  However, I don’t think you’ll need to wait that long to receive one.

OpenStax provides free online textbooks and the ability for teachers to create virtual classrooms and have student annotate the text (along with other features). It’s limited to college instructors now. However, it appears they are expanding to K-12, starting with an AP pilot and you can apply to participate. I first heard about it by an announcement of research they were beginning to analyze student online highlighting of text and try to identify how to enhance that strategy for learning. I’m adding it to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

Hangouts On Air moving from Google+ to YouTube Live on September 12 is the headline of a TechCrunch post. Richard Byrne has written about the same topic.

Map Channels lets you create animated driving directions of Google Street View that you can embed. I’m not sure how generally useful it will be, but this feature will be helpful in my favorite lesson of each year – A Lesson Highlighting Community Assets — Not Deficits. In that lesson, students compare our local school neighborhood with the wealthiest community in Sacramento. Often, we can visit both neighborhoods on field trips. Some years, however, we “visit” the wealthier one via Street View, and a tool like this makes it easier. Thanks to Google Maps Mania for the tip.

Vizia lets you integrate quizzes and polls into videos. You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog. I’m adding it to A Potpourri Of The Best & Most Useful Video Sites.

How to Place an Image-based Quiz in Your Blog is by Richard Byrne. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Create Online Tests.

August 14, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Call Me Ishmael” Is A Neat Site & Model For Student Book Activity

callme

Call Me Ishmael is a neat site that I learned about through John Damaso’s excellent post, Top 10 ISTE takeaways for English teachers.

It’s very simple – students read a book of their choice, call a number and leave a message telling a short story how it impacted their life. The site’s creator then picks three of these stories each week to (literally) type them out and publish a video with the typing coordinated with the voice message.

Here are a couple of examples:

All the voice messages seem to be embedded on the site, too, and visitors can vote on which ones they think the site should turn into videos.

It’s a pretty neat idea, and I especially like that the voice messages are embedded. That way, even if a video is not made with them, students can still see that their message is posted.

Even if you don’t have students call the number, though, the videos can be used as good models. Students can easily create their own versions of these kinds of “book trailers” by a website like Little Bird Tales or the KnowMe phone app.

I’m adding this post to The Best Posts On Books: Why They’re Important & How To Help Students Select, Read, Write & Discuss Them.

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