Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

May 13, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Ed Tech Digest

Four years ago, in another somewhat futile attempt to reduce the backlog of resources I want to share, I began this occasional “Ed Tech Digest” post where I share three or four links I think are particularly useful and related to…ed tech.

You might also be interested in The Best Ed Tech Resources Of 2017.

Here are this week’s choices:

Lalilo is designed to teach literacy to students in the K-2 range and could also be used with Beginning ELLs. Teachers can create virtual classrooms for students to access activities. I learned about it from David Kapuler. I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where Students Can Work Independently & Let Teachers Check On Progress.

Digimix lets you create personalized music playlists, along with writing individual comments about each song.

Fugue is a source of free music for videos.  I’m adding it to The Best Places To Get Royalty-Free Music & Sound Effects.

Copy edit This! No. 12 Quiz is the latest cool NY Times grammar interactive.  I’m adding it to The Best Interactive “Copy-Edit This!” Grammar Quizzes In The New York Times.

Kinemaster is an online editing tool for Android.  I’m adding it to Not The “Best,” But A List… Of Online Video Editors.  Thanks to Nik Peachey for the tip.

UPDATED LIST: CHECK OUT THESE CLASS BLOGS! is from The Edublogger. I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice For Teachers (And Others!) On How To Be Better Bloggers.

Lensoo Create – Create Whiteboard Videos on Your Phone or Tablet is from Richard Byrne.

Share This Letter With Students to Show Them the Cost of Copyright Infringement is from Richard Byrne. I’m adding it to The Best Resources To Learn About Copyright Issues.

Capsure – Share Collections of Images With Audio Notes is from Richard Byrne. I’m adding it to The Best Online Tools For Using Photos In Lessons.

May 9, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Great Tool For Creating Sequencing Activities

Russel Tarr’s ClassTools site is on a zillion of my “Best” lists, and he keeps on making it better and better!

His newest addition is a super-easy tool for creating sequencing activities, “Drag and Drop.”

It can be used in lots of lessons, and I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Creating Sentence Scrambles.

Here’s one I made in less than a minute:

May 9, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Now This Is VERY Intriguing: Students & Teachers Can Now Create Their Own Google Virtual Reality “Tours”

I’ve previously shared a lot about Google Expeditions, the virtual reality “field trip” tool (see The Best Resources For Finding And Creating Virtual Field Trips and and A Beginning List Of The Best Resources On Virtual Reality In Education).

Today, Google unveiled a neat new feature – teachers and students can now create their own virtual reality tours!

It’s call Tour Creator, and looks very cool.

You can read more about it at Google and watch the video below:

I’m adding this info to The Best Places Where Students Can Create Online Learning/Teaching Objects For An “Authentic Audience”

(Addendum: You can also read more about it at TechCrunch and at Richard Byrne’s blog)

How to Add Points of Interest to Virtual Reality Tours in Google’s Tour Creator is from Richard Byrne.

May 6, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

 

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The 50 Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Wrish lets you create a webpage (that can remain editable or not) with text and images easily and without required registration. I’m adding it to A Few Simple Ways To Introduce Reluctant Colleagues To Technology. That’s part of a larger My Best Posts For Tech Novices (Plus A Few From Other People) list, which needs to be updated.

CC Hound and No Lick are new sites that offer music that can be used for free in presentations. I’m adding them to The Best Places To Get Royalty-Free Music & Sound Effects.

I’ve previously written about Storium, and it’s on The Best Sites For Collaborative Storytelling list. They now have a tool specifically for classrooms.

Branch is a new smartphone app that lets users create collaborative stories.

April 21, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

 

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The 50 Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

The BBC just made 16,000 sound effects downloadable and usable. You can read more about it at Open Culture. I’m adding it to The Best Places To Get Royalty-Free Music & Sound Effects.

Motion Comics lets you create a comic that can function like a slideshow with music, like this one.  Unfortunately, you have to upload any of the images or sound you want to use – they don’t have a “bank” you can draw from.  I’m still adding it to The Best Ways To Make Comic Strips Online.

Vinstant looks pretty interesting. Basically, you mix and match different video clips in order to tell a story. The app isn’t public yet, and, though they say they’ll have a web-based version, that’s not available, either. But I think this could be very useful for English Language Learners.

April 17, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

 

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The 50 Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Maslo AI looks like it might be an interesting tool to let students (particularly ELLs) keep a voice journal on their phone. It provides prompts, as well as AI-driven feedback. I haven’t really explored it yet, though, so I’m not ready to add it to The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English.

Ocobot lets you make one free Chatbot. I’m adding it to The Best Tools For Creating Chatbots.

Oorja is a free video-conferencing tool that supposed to be particularly designed for people to work on coding together, but it looks to me like it would be useful for anyone.  I’m not going to add it to The Best Online Tools For Real-Time Collaboration, though, until I know it’s going to be around for awhile.

I’m adding this next tweet to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games:

April 17, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

National Geographic’s “Open Explorer” Lets Anyone Create Their Own Expedition

National Geographic has just unveiled Open Explorer.

They call it a “digital field journal” where anyone can document their exploration of anything (they use “your backyard” as one simple example), as well as follow the explorations of others (many are much more involved than a backyard).

You need to register for the site, which takes a few seconds. The buttons to “start your own expedition” don’t seem to work right now, but you can easily get to it by clicking on the “Dashboard” button at the top right of the screen after you register. I’m sure they’ll fix that glitch soon.

You can read more about it at Why We Created This First-of-Its-Kind Digital Field Journal.

I have students in my ELL World History class do a project on Explorers, and I’m trying to figure out if I can incorporate this new tool in it.

I’m adding this info to The Best Places Where Students Can Write For An “Authentic Audience.”

April 14, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

 

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The 50 Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Toonator lets you easily create simple animations.  I’m adding it to The Best Ways For Students To Create Online Animations.

Any Image lets you easily create what they call “Social Cards” but, in reality, are simple clickable images – click anywhere on the image and it will take you to a url address of your choosing.

TwitRSSme lets you create a RSS feed to follow anyone on Twitter. For those of us who use an RSS Reader, this can come in very handy. Twitter used to have their own, but they ended it awhile back.

MapBoard lets you work collaboratively with others online to draw on a map. It’s lets you leave markers and write about them, but you can’t add images. That missing feature is why I’m not adding it to The Best Map-Making Sites On The Web.

I learned from Richard Byrne that Adobe Spark has created a version for education that’s free, as is their regular version. Adobe Spark is already on The “All-Time” Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education. It doesn’t seem to me that their ed version provides what is most useful for teachers – the ability to create virtual classroom with student assignments, but I might be missing something.

Kevin Hodgson has a nice tutorial on how to use Google Slides to create Choose Your Own Adventure stories, and he has many student-created examples. I’m adding them to The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories.

Quizziz is on The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games list.  Now that they let you assign quiz games for students to do as homework, I’m also now adding it to The Best Online Homework Sites For English Language Learners – Please Offer Your Own Suggestions

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