Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

October 16, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Resources For Writing In Social Studies Classes

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As I mentioned two days ago, in addition to teaching high school during the day, I also teach an ESL Methods class to teacher credential candidates at California State University, Sacramento.

Next semester, I have also insanely agreed to teach a content literacy class to credential candidates at the University of California, Davis.

I’ve got a good handle on writing in Social Studies and English classes and, in preparation for the course, am reading up on writing in math and science classes. Two days ago, I published The Best Resources For Writing In Math Class. Yesterday, I posted The Best Resources For Writing In Science Class.

Even though, as I mentioned, I feel I’m pretty experienced in writing and Social Studies (since I teach both English and Social Studies classes), I thought it couldn’t hurt my credential students or me if I created a similar list for that subject.

You might also be interested in My Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

Here’s the beginning of a list on writing in social studies (I’ve also including some reading resources). Feel free to share your own suggestions:

Common Core: Teach Literacy in Every Subject is from Ed Week.

Writing Across the Curriculum – Social Studies

Strategies for Writing to Learn in Social Studies

Writing In The Social Studies Classroom

R.A.F.T. Prompts for History & Social Studies Class

Writing in Social Studies Classrooms

Creative Writing In Social Studies

Common Core Connection: Narrative Writing in the Social Studies Classroom

Teaching Reading In Social Studies

Integrating Social Studies into Literacy Routines is by Angela Watson

Reading Strategies for the Social Studies Class

October 15, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Resources For Writing In Science Class

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As I mentioned yesterday, in addition to teaching high school during the day, I also teach an ESL Methods class to teacher credential candidates at California State University, Sacramento.

Next semester, I have also insanely agreed to teach a content literacy class to credential candidates at the University of California, Davis.

I’ve got a good handle on writing in Social Studies (though will be posting a separate list for that subject) and English classes and, in preparation for the course, am reading up on writing in math and science classes. Yesterday, I published The Best Resources For Writing In Math Class.

You might also be interested in My Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

Here’s the beginning of a list on writing in science (I’ve also included some reading resources). Feel free to share your own suggestions:

Common Core: Teach Literacy in Every Subject is from Ed Week.

Engaging Students Through Writing: The Case of a Science Class is from The College of Staten Island (where I grew up!).

Creative Writing in Science Class is from Education Week.

Writing In Science

Writing Across the Curriculum – Science

Science The Write Way

Science Writing: A Tool for Learning Science and Developing Language is from The Exploratorium.

Writing in Science Classrooms

Descriptive Writing: Just Right for Science Class is from Middleweb.

Literacy In Science

Writing In Science

Writing In Science is a video from Annenberg.

Lots of free downloadables at Writing in Science in Action.

Writing in the Science Class: Lab Conclusions

Integrating the Common Core Literacy Skills in Science Classes

Encouraging active reading in the science classroom

Reading Techniques Help Students Master Science is from Scientific American.

Strategies for Teaching Science Content Reading

Integrating Literacy Strategies into Science Instruction

Teaching Reading in Science

Composing Science has great materials on writing in science class.

October 15, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
5 Comments

The Best Resources For Writing In Math Class

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Regular readers know that, in addition to teaching high school during the day, I also teach an ESL Methods class to teacher credential candidates at California State University, Sacramento.

Next semester, I have also insanely agreed to teach a content literacy class to credential candidates at the University of California, Davis.

I’ve got a good handle on writing in Social Studies and English classes and, in preparation for the course, am reading up on writing in math and science classes.

You might also be interested in My Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

Here’s the beginning of a list on writing in math (I’ve also including some resources on reading), and one on writing in science is not far behind. Feel free to share your own suggestions:

Common Core: Teach Literacy in Every Subject is from Ed Week.

Should We Do More Writing in Math Class? appeared in Middleweb.

Students in My Math Classes Next Year Will Do a Lot of Writing. Here’s Why is from Ed Week.

4 Tips for Writing in the Math Classroom is by Heather Wolpert-Gawron.

Writing In Math Class?

Writing in Math Class by Mr. Honner

WRITING IN MATH CLASS is by Doug Lemov.

Writing Across the Curriculum – Mathematics

Writing in Math is by Marilyn Burns.

Using Writing In Mathematics To Deepen Student Learning

Using Writing In Mathematics

Harness the Power of Writing in Math is from The Teaching Channel.

Using Writing to Improve Math Learning is from AMLE.

JOURNAL WRITING IN THE MATHEMATICS CLASSROOM: A BEGINNER’S APPROACH

Integrating Writing and Mathematics

A Guide to Writing in Mathematics Classes

Math Prompts from Read Write Think

Reading in the Mathematics Classroom

Utilizing Reading Strategies in the Math Classroom

Teaching Reading in Mathematics and Science

October 12, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Places Where Students Can Tell Their – And/Or Their Families – Immigration Story

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Students having an “authentic audience” for their work – in other words, someone other than their teacher – can have a major positive effect on motivation (you can see the research behind this claim at The Best Places Where Students Can Write For An “Authentic Audience”).

Here are the best places that students can share their own immigration stories, and/or those of their families, so that an authentic audience can read or see them. Their stories can also remain anonymous at these sites by using a pseudonym:

Clearly, the best one is from the University of Minnesota – Immigrant Stories. Their announcement today that they are expanding their local program internationally (see the NBC News article, Immigrant Story Archiving Project to Expand Internationally) is what prompted me to post this list. It’s a video archive, and it includes a step-by-step interactive on planning a video, including offering specific suggestions of topics (for example, focusing on an object).

“My Immigration Story” is designed for immigrants to share their story in 200 words or less. It’s specifically designed to:

Let other Americans know how the current generation of immigrants is helping enrich this land of opportunity.

The famous New York City Tenement Museum, located near where my father was raised, has just expanded its facility and website. You can read more about it at NBC News, NYC’s Tenement Museum Will Now Showcase a Puerto Rican Migrant Family . They’ve added some additional nice resources. One is Your Story, Our Story is a digital archive where students can upload images of family objects and their stories.  It has lots of decent free lesson plans to use with it.

Let me know if you know of other similar sites!

October 8, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Drafting Board” Is A Good Interactive For Teaching Argument

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I’ve previously posted about how impressed I am with recent improvements to the iCivics site (see iCivics Steps Up Its Game Big Time With Free Virtual Classrooms & Primary Source Interactive).

Today, through Education Week, I learned about yet another relatively new addition called Drafting Board.

Here’s how they describe the tool:

This online tool walks students through the process step by step, showing them how to understand an issue before taking a side, use evidence to support a claim, and address the opposing point of view. At the end, students have a complete argumentative essay with an introduction, body, counterargument, and conclusion.

You have to register to use it (it’s free) and then students can log-in and work on seven different units. The units seem very accessible and engaging.

I’m adding this info to both:

The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

The Best Online Resources For Helping Students Learn To Write Persuasive Essays (which I have just updated and revised)

October 5, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The National Day Of Writing Is On Oct. 20th – Here Are 36 Related “Best” Lists

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“Every October 20, the National Council of Teachers of English celebrates the importance, joy, and evolution of writing through a tweetup, using the hashtag #WhyIWrite and events hosted by thousands of educators across the country.”

Here are thirty-six “Best” lists related to writing. I need to revised and update some of them, but many are up-to-date. The first two in particular are my “go-to” lists:

The Best Posts On Writing Instruction

The Best Websites For K-12 Writing Instruction/Reinforcement

The Best Places Where Students Can Write Online

The Best Sites For Grammar Practice

Not “The Best,” But “A List” Of Mindmapping, Flow Chart Tools, & Graphic Organizers

The Best Resources For Researching & Writing Biographies

The Best Resources For Learning How To Write Response To Literature Essays

The Best Places Where Students Can Write For An “Authentic Audience”

The Best Places Where Students Can Create Online Learning/Teaching Objects For An “Authentic Audience”

The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories

The Best Sites To Learn About Advertising

The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary

The Best Online Interactive Exercises For Writing That Are Not Related To Literary Analysis

The Best Online Resources To Teach About Plagiarism

The Best Resources For Learning Research & Citation Skills

The Best Sites For Students To Create & Participate In Online Debates

The Best Online Resources For Helping Students Learn To Write Persuasive Essays

The Best Spelling Sites

The Best Sites For Gaining A Basic Understanding Of Adjectives

The “Best” Sites For Helping Students Write Autobiographical Incident Essays

The Best Sites To Learn “Feelings” Words

The Best Sites For ELL’s To Learn About Punctuation

The Best Resources To Help Students Write Research Essays

The Best Sites For Learning To Write A Story

The Best Writing Advice From Famous Authors

The Best Resources On Punctuation

The Best Resources On Getting Student Writers To “Buy-Into” Revision – Help Me Find More

The Best Sites For Collaborative Storytelling

The Best Online Tools That Can Help Students Write An Essay

The Best Videos & Articles Where Athletes Explain How Reading & Writing Well Has Helped Their Career – Help Me Find More

The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More

The Best Ways To Use Mistakes When Teaching Writing

The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More

The Best Video Clips On The Benefits Of Writing Well — Help Me Find More

The Best Resources For Teaching/Learning About How To Write Compare/Contrast Essays

The Best Links For Helping Students Learn How To Write “Leads” or “Ledes”

The Best Resources For Writing In Social Studies Classes

The Best Resources For Writing In Science Class

The Best Resources For Writing In Math Class

September 11, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Video & Transcript Of President Obama’s 9/11 Memorial Speech & How I Will Use It In Class

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Among the many remembrances of 9/11 today, President Obama spoke at a memorial at the Pentagon.

The transcript of speech can be found here, and I’ve embedded him speaking at the bottom of this post.

I plan on have students first read this portion of the speech:

Groups like al Qaeda, like ISIL, know that…they will never be able to defeat a nation as great and as strong as America. So, instead, they’ve tried to terrorize in the hopes that they can stoke enough fear that we turn on each other and that we change who we are or how we live. And that’s why it is so important today that we reaffirm our character as a nation — a people drawn from every corner of the world, every color, every religion, every background — bound by a creed as old as our founding, e pluribus unum. Out of many, we are one. For we know that our diversity — our patchwork heritage — is not a weakness; it is still, and always will be, one of our greatest strengths. This is the America that was attacked that September morning. This is the America that we must remain true to.

Across our country today, Americans are coming together in service and remembrance. We run our fingers over the names in memorial benches here at the Pentagon. We walk the hallowed grounds of a Pennsylvania field. We look up at a gleaming tower that pierces the New York City skyline. But in the end, the most enduring memorial to those we lost is ensuring the America that we continue to be — that we stay true to ourselves, that we stay true to what’s best in us, that we do not let others divide us.

They then would respond to this prompt:

What does President Obama think is the best way to honor those who died on 9/11? To what extent do you agree with what he is saying? To support your opinion, be sure to include specific examples drawn from your own experience, your observations of others, or any of your readings.

Feel free to leave suggestions on how I can make this a better learning activity.

I’m adding this post to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction and to The Best Sites To Help Teach About 9/11.

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