Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

October 16, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Sokanu” Looks Like A Useful Tool To Help Students Explore Career Choices

 

I have some concerns about Laurene Powell Jobs’ effort to reinvent high schools  (see The Best Articles For Learning About Laurene Powell Jobs’ Project To Redesign High Schools).

However, her organization has just released an online tool students can use to explore possible interest in various careers.  It’s called Sokanu and seems fairly engaging and somewhat useful. I wish the descriptions of the different careers was a bit more engaging than a long piece of text, though.

Nevertheless, I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Students Exploring Jobs and Careers.

October 16, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Simple History” Is A Decent Free Alternative To Brainpop

 

Brainpop videos are good, and I have a teacher’s subscription to them. But you have to pay in order to see them.

Simple History is a YouTube channel that provides a decent selection of comparable – and in some cases, better – animations. They don’t offer the extras, like quizzes, offered by Brainpop. And if your school or district pays for Brainpop, the additional student creation options are great.

However, if you’re in a school that doesn’t pay for it, and you’re already spending your money on a ton of other school-related resourced (see The Best Data On How Much Money Teachers Pay Out Of Their Own Pocket – What Do You Spend?), then Simple History is worth a look.

Here’s a sample:

October 16, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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October’s (2017) Best Tweets – Part Three

'Twitter' photo (c) 2010, West McGowan - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every month I make a few short lists highlighting my choices of the best resources I through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog.

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page.

You might also be interested in New & Updated: Recommendations For Who To Follow On Twitter In 2017.

October 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Best Video For ELLs On The Salem Witch Trials

I’ve always been surprised that there are few ELL accessible videos on the Salem Witch Trials.

I’ve shared a few at our U.S. History Class blog, and do some related activities. Students are always very engaged.

Today, though, I’ve finally found one. Even though we covered the topic last week, at least it will be there for next year…

October 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – Part Two

 

Time for another end-of-the-year ”The Best…” list.  I’m adding this post to All 2017 “Best” Lists – In One Place!

As usual, In order to make it on this list, games had to:

* be accessible to English Language Learners.

* provide exceptionally engaging content.

* not provide access to other non-educational games on their site.

* be seen by me during the last six months of 2017. So they might have been around prior to this time, but I’m still counting them in this year’s list.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2015 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2014

The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2012 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games — 2011

The Best Online Learning Games — 2010

The Best Online Learning Games — 2009

The Best Online Learning Games — 2008

The Best Online Learning Games — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017- Part Two:

Google Publishes Series Of Video Instructions About Creating Online “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories

Bamboozle lets you create games your class can play by projecting them on a screen.  They seem easy to create, though I it doesn’t yet have that large of a collection of ones that other teachers have created.  You might also be interested in The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

Payback is a new free “choose your own adventure” quasi-game that’s designed to help students anticipate college costs. I heard about it through a recent New York Times article headlined A Game to Help Students Pay the Right Price for College. It’s definitely accessible, even though it’s a bit simplistic. I could see using it to initiate a conversation with students about college issues.I’m adding this info to: The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career.

Here are several new Geography games I’m adding to The Best Online Geography Games (thanks to Google Maps Mania for the tips).

They stand out from the ones presently on the list, which are all good – but very, very similar:

My Name Is Hunt uses maps, but is also a text-based “choose your own adventure” style of game (see more of them at The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories). It’s only accessible to advanced English Language Learners, but definitely is unusual.

urbanopticon is a game that incorporates the idea of “citizen science.” Here is how they explain it:

This game will show you randomly selected urban scenes and ask you where they are. In so doing, we capture your mental map – that is, which parts of the city you tend to correctly recognize. By combining your answers with other people’s, we are able to draw the collective mental map of the city. The collective map is important because it is associated with happiness. In his “The image of the city”, Kevin Lynch showed that the happiest areas are those that are easily recognized and, as such, are prominent in people’s minds. By knowing which areas are difficult to recognize, we are able to recommend urban interventions to different stakeholders, including local government, urban planners and artists.

Where In the World Looks like a very good game for students. Here is its description:

Play the game to explore country landmarks all over the world, from royal palaces to historical attractions. See if you can figure out where in the world you are!

TIME has created a neat new game called “Can You Draw The States?” You’re prompted to draw a state. Once you’re done, you’re graded on how well you did and it’s put on a blank U.S. map so you can ultimately see your complete work. In some ways, it’s similar to an older game called Scribble States.

Factitious is an engaging online game to teach about fake news. It could be a fun activity to do to finish-up a more extensive lesson on the topic. You can learn more about it at NPR’s article, To Test Your Fake News Judgment, Play This Game. You can also find lots of resources on teaching about fake news at The Best Tools & Lessons For Teaching Information Literacy, including the lesson plan I did for The NY Times.

Carol Salva writes about the many ways teachers can use the Kahoot game with ELLs.

Quiz Game Master lets you easily many different types of learning games for students to play. You can see a list of all the different types on the image at the top of this post. Unfortunately, the site doesn’t automatically host the games – you either have to pay $5 annually for that feature or download the games you create as a zip file.

With both Jo Boaler and Dan Meyer endorsing Super Math World, I can only assume it’s a great math learning game.

I’m not a big fan of Word Searches, but they can sometimes be a fun activity for students to create. Word Search Labs is an easy tool for creating word searches online. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Making Crossword Puzzles & Hangman Games.

October 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2017 – So Far):

Teacher responds to DeVos: Schools aren’t like food trucks, and education is ‘not a side of fries’ is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Our New U.S. Secretary of Education.

Education Isn’t the Key to a Good Income is by Rachel Cohen. She also posted a follow-up to it. I’m adding them both to The Best Resources On Why Improving Education Is Not THE Answer To Poverty & Inequality.

The Monumental Task Of Reopening Puerto Rico’s Schools is from NPR.

California will provide a year of free community college for new students is from The Sacramento Bee.

Eli Broad, Patron of Los Angeles, to Step Down From His Philanthropy is from The New York Times. You might also be interested in The Best Posts & Articles On Billionaire’s Charter Plan To Split LA’s School District.

A Chat With MacArthur Genius Nikole Hannah-Jones is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About School Desegregation (& Segregation) – Help Me Find More.

October 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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All 2017 “Best” Lists – In One Place!

 

I have begun posting end-of-year “Best” lists, and thought readers would find it helpful if created a post where I’d add links to them as they appear….

You can also check out All Mid-Year 2017 “Best” Lists In One Place.

Here are the end-of-year ones, which should total twenty-five or so when they’re all done:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – Part Two

The 50 Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – Part Two

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2017 – Part Two

October 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017 – Part Two

 

Here’s one more in my series of end-of-year “Best” lists (you can see all 1,700 of the lists here).

You might also be interested in these previous posts:

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017 – So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2015 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2015 — So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — So Far

The “All-Time” Best Social Studies Sites

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – So Far

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) Related To Social Studies In One Place

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part One

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2011

The Best “The Best…” Lists Related To Social Studies — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2009

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2008

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017— Part Two (I’ll begin by sharing links to recent “Best” lists on Social Studies-related topics):

The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The Santa Rosa Fires (& How To Help Victims)

The Best Sites For Learning About Weather

The Best Videos Explaining “Intersectionality”

The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The National Anthem Protests

The Best Resources For Learning About The “Little Rock 9”

The Best Resources For Learning About The Rohingya Refugee Crisis

The Best Resources For Examining “Privilege”

The Best – Or, At Least, The Most Interesting – Resources About Ben Franklin

The Best Resources For Learning & Teaching About Malcolm X

A Beginning List For Learning About The 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics

A Beginning List For Learning About The 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics

The Best Resources For Teaching About Confederate Monuments

The Best Sites Where Students Can Transcribe Historical Texts

The Best Resources For Learning About Proposed Changes To U.S. “Legal” Immigration Policy

The Best Resources For Learning About Hurricane Harvey

The Best Ways To Help Victims Of Hurricane Harvey

Resources For Learning About #Charlottesville

Woolly Mammoths & Inductive Learning

U.S. History Students Creating A “Buffalo Hide Painting” – Lesson & Student Hand-Out

Here’s What My ELL Students Are Reading & Writing About Columbus

Important Advice For White Educators (& Others)

The New York Times shares some wild charts showing the economic “inequality is out of control.” You can check them at out at Our Broken Economy, in One Simple Chart. Here’s an excerpt from the column:

I’m adding it to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality.

At The Best “Lists Of Lists” Of Influential People, Events & Ideas, I share what the headline says, plus resources on the “most important” documents and “objects. Now, The Atlantic has come up with an interesting addition: What Was the Most Important Letter in History? They have a number of nominations, ranging from the obvious (“Letter From Birmingham Jail”) to the not-so-obvious (“The “Groans of the Britons” letter, sent circa 450 a.d. by ancient Britons”).

ProPublica has used a recent study on immigration and created a a very useful interactive called The Immigration Effect. With it, you can modify immigration policy and see it’s impact on the U.S. economy. Here’s an excerpt from their article about the study:

I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States.

Sacred Places, Sacred Ways is a nice interactive map to five places “revered” by some of the world’s key religions.

I have several interactive maps at The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day that show the flow of refugees around the world. They tend to be confusing – at least, to me. The University of Zurich, though, has developed a new one called Refugee Movements which is clean, clear and easy to use.  The screenshot at the top of this post shows its interface, and the site has a slider at the bottom that lets you change the years.

Google has supported the development of a brand-new site created by the Equal Justice Initiative called Lynching In America. It includes multi-media resources and maps, along with discussions on how it relates to criminal justice today. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Teach About African-American History.

Thanks to Renee Moore, I learned about the video of a 1967 address Martin Luther King, Jr. gave to junior high school students in Philadelphia. It’s titled “What Is Your Life’s Blueprint?” and I haven’t been able to find a full transcript on line.  Here’s a very partial one, but much is missing.  A full transcript apparently is available in a book. It’s impressive, to say the least, and would be very useful in class:

I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Learning About Martin Luther King.

Stanford has a new impressive climate change curriculum.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and Google have created an interactive Searching For Syria site providing an excellent overview of the Syrian War and its refugee crisis.  You can read more about it at TechCrunch. I’m adding it to:

The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day

The Best Resources For Learning About What’s Happening In Syria

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