Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 22, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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KQED Interviews Me About Saul Alinsky & His Connection To Teaching

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Two days after Ben Carson suggested that Saul Alinsky was, and Hillary Clinton is, a devil worshiper, the KQED Mindshift blog published an interview with me about how I apply his work in the classroom.

Check out Books Teachers Share: Larry Ferlazzo and Rules for Radicals.

July 21, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Completed Revised Plan For Theory Of Knowledge Essay – With Lots Of Examples & Resources Included

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I’m definitely making progress this summer as I completely revise how I teach my IB Theory of Knowledge course.

I’ve just finished updating my four-week plan for the TOK Essay, and you can find it on our class blog. It’s filled with links to lots of resources and examples – all downloadable.

As always, I’d love to hear suggestions on how I cam make it better!

July 21, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Here Is My Revised Six-Week Plan For TOK Oral Presentations, Including A Zillion Examples & Resources

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I have completely revised and updated my six-week plan – from start to finish – for IB Theory of Knowledge Oral Presentations.

You can find it all here on our class blog at Oral Presentation Schedule.

It includes plenty of student examples, videos, and downloadable resources.

We use much of what’s there the classroom without every student having a device, but I’ve put everything there so I have it in one place.

I’d love to hear feedback on how I can make it better!

July 21, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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No Big Surprise: Study Finds Rundown School Buildings Hurt Academic Achievement

Here’s why run-down schools trigger low test scores is the headline of a Eureka Alert report on a new study.

Here’s an excerpt:

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It certainly makes sense to me.

However, this next finding seems a little over-the-top:

Maxwell found that poor building conditions, and the resulting negative perception of the school’s social climate, accounted for 70 percent of the poor academic performance.

Plenty of other research has found lots of socio-economic issues more impactful – see The Best Places To Learn What Impact A Teacher (& Outside Factors) Have On Student Achievement.

I just hope people don’t get the impression that nice buildings are all teachers, and our students and their families, need.

But they sure can’t hurt!

July 21, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Mini-Lesson On “Cognitive Ease”

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Veritasium published a new video today titled “The Illusion Of Truth.”

It’s about the concept of “cognitive ease,” written about by Nobel-Prize winner Daniel Kahneman. It describes our tendency to make fast and easy decisions.

Here’s how I plan on using it for a short lesson as part of my Theory of Knowledge unit on Human Sciences:

First, I’ll show the video:

Next, I’ll shared edited parts of these three online articles:

Cognitive Ease: The Secret to Great Interviewing

Is Your Thinking Lazy? Or Is It Just a Bad Case Of Cognitive Ease?

Cognitive Ease: The Secret to Great Interviewing Part Two

Then students would answer these questions and then share.

  1. With these definitions as a background, can you think of any times when it might be beneficial for you to experience “cognitive ease”? Why?
  2. Can you think of any times when it might be beneficial for you to experience “cognitive strain”? Why?
  3. Can you think of any times when it might be beneficial for you (and for others) if you created the conditions for them to experience “cognitive ease”? Why?
  4. Can you think of any times when it might be beneficial for you (and for others) if you created the conditions for them to experience “cognitive strain”? Why?
  5. Can you think of any times when you could be experiencing “cognitive ease” – both on your own and when others are manipulating the situation so you are having that experience – and it would not be beneficial to you? Why?

Feel free to help me make it a better lesson!

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