Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

May 17, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Today Is The 61st Anniversary Of Brown v. Board Of Education – Here Are Related Resources

Today is the 61st Anniversary of the Brown v. Board Of Education Supreme Court ruling.

The Huffington Post has published a useful “state of education for black students in 2015.”

You might also be interested in last year’s The Best Commentaries On The 60th Anniversary Of Brown vs. Board Of Education.

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May 17, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My Summer Plans & How They Will Affect This Blog

There are three more weeks of school left, including two insane field trips. May all of us finish the year strong!

I thought some readers might be interesting in hearing about my summer plans and, if you’re not, feel free to stop reading :) .

My big project will be authoring, along with my colleague Katie Hull, a sequel to our surprisingly popular ESL/ELL Teacher’s Survival Guide. I’m very confident that teachers are going to find this one as, if not more, useful than our first one! Our manuscript deadline is September 1st, and it should be out in the first part of 2016.

Because of the work involved in writing it, I anticipate publishing fewer posts here over the next few months. I also expect many of the ones I do share will be collections of thematic links instead of posts highlighting individual resources. Of course, in June I will also start publishing my usual mid-year “Best of 2015 – So Far” lists, too.

One key lesson I’ve finally learning from authoring eight books over the last eight years has been that, after this one is done, I’ll be reducing my output to one every two years, instead. That seems to me to be a much more sensible schedule, one which I should have begun following long ago.

New episodes of my BAM! Radio Show will stop appearing in early June and will begin again in September.

I’ll be taking a break from covering new questions-and-answers over at my Education Week Teacher column beginning in late June and then begin again sometime in September. Of course, I will post my usual thematic compilations of past posts there over the coming months, along with a handful of interviews I’ll be doing with education authors.

Along with all those tasks, I plan on spending time with family, continuing to play basketball several times each week, and do some lesson preparation for the fall.

I hope you have a great summer!

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May 16, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem”

The famous trolley problem is one that I suspect all IB Theory of Knowledge classes consider during the year.

Here are a variety of useful videos that address it. I particularly like the first one, which is really the first in a series of four from the PBS (they all automatically start when one ends), and the second from the BBC:

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May 16, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Here Are Forms Students Will Be Using To Evaluate The Class & Me

It’s that time — three more weeks left in the school year!

As usual, one of the final activities students will be doing is completing anonymous evaluations of the class and me. I’ve written quite a bit about this process, and you can see all of those posts at The Best Posts On Students Evaluating Classes (And Teachers).

Also, as usual, I’ll be posting the unfiltered results, which I also share with my colleagues and administrators. I think that students tend to take the process a little more seriously when they realize that I make the results public. Interestingly enough, The Washington Post republished my report on the results from one of my tougher classes awhile back.

I’ve used various forms for these student evaluations, and you can download them in the previously mentions “Best” list. This year, though, I thought I’d do something different and, instead of looking at those previous sheets, I just created them from scratch.

Here is the form I’m using for my English Language Learner World History and U.S. History class, and here’s the one I’m using for my IB Theory of Knowledge class. I haven’t gotten around to creating one for my ELL English/Geography class, but will share it when it’s complete.

Take a look at what I’ve got, and feel free to share any suggestions for how I could make them better!

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May 16, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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May’s Infographics & Interactives Galore – Part Two

There are just so many good infographics and interactives out there that I’ve begun a new semi-regular feature called “Infographics & Interactives Galore.”

You can see others at A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics and by searching “infographics” on this blog.

I’ll still be publishing separate posts to individually highlight especially useful infographics and interactives, but you’ll find others in this regular feature.

Here goes:

The Internet Of Things: A Primer is an interactive from Information Is Beautiful.

What Reading Really Looks Like When You’re Dyslexic is an infographic from GOOD. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Walking In Someone Else’s Shoes.

I’m adding this next infographic to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures:

6 Reasons to Put Your Phone Away is a great infographic. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Student Cellphone Use In Class — Please Contribute More.

Business Etiquette Around The World

I’m adding this tweet to The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom:

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May 16, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Teachers Stay Because ‘They Made A Choice To Serve'”

Teachers Stay Because ‘They Made A Choice To Serve’ is the title of my latest Education Week Teacher column.

In it, educators Renee Moore, Katy Farber, Sharon Jacobs, and Opal Davis Dawson share their thoughts about why teachers stay at difficult-to-staff schools.

Here are some excerpts:

The-art-of-teaching

If-you-want-to-really

This-is-a

She-became-emotional-as

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May 16, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My Almost Complete World History Class Blog

world history

This year, I taught World History to English Language Learners, and it was the first time I had taught it in several years.

To support instruction, I created a World History Class Blog. It has what I think are the most accessible online resources out there to English Language Learners.

Though it specifically follows the chapters in our textbook, Access World History by Great Source (by the way, thanks to Mary Ann Zehr for originally sharing it with me), it pretty much follows the chronology of events that most World History textbooks use.

Feel free to use it with your classes and to also recommend other resources I should add it to it.

Right now, it’s missing resources for the final two chapters, but I’ll be taking care of that in the next week or two…

One difference, though, between this one and the blogs I have for my other classes is that you won’t find uploaded materials that I use for lessons, and you won’t find student examples of work. But I still think the online resources on it are very useful.

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