Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

May 19, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Five years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far. and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – Part Two. Also, check out A Collection Of My Best Resources On Teaching English Language Learners.

In addition, look for our new book on teaching ELLs, which was published in the Spring of 2018.

Here are this week’s choices:

Educators face new challenges in ‘superdiverse’ classrooms where multiple languages are spoken is from the L.A. Daily News.

Focused Error Correction – how you can make a time-consuming necessity more effective and manageable is by Gianfranco Conti. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On ESL/EFL/ELL Error Correction.

These immigrants came for a better education. Now, they’ll never graduate high school is a depressing article from The Miami Herald.

Supporting English Language Learners Through Station Rotation is from ASCD. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Planning “Learning Stations” – Please Add More.

Here’s a video tweeted out by the National Teacher of the Year:

You’ll want to put this professional development event on your calendar. I’ll be posting more about it soon:

There but for fortune…..

May 19, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Research Studies Of The Week

'magnifying glass' photo (c) 2005, Tall Chris - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

I often write about research studies from various fields and how they can be applied to the classroom. I write individual posts about ones that I think are especially significant, and will continue to do so. However, so many studies are published that it’s hard to keep up. So I’ve started writing a “round-up” of some of them each week or every other week as a regular feature.

By the way, you might also be interested in My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2017 – Part Two.

Here are some new useful studies (and related resources):

Starting to think about tracking is from Teaching With Problems. It’s not a new study. However, it’s a good summary of the existing research. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Ability Grouping & Tracking — Help Me Find More.

Learning by teaching others is extremely effective – a new study tested a key reason why is from Research Digest. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Helping Students Teach Their Classmates — Help Me Find More.

The Myth of ‘Learning Styles’ is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Issue Of “Learning Styles”

Big surprise, eh? Students Learn Less When They Sense Teacher Hostility is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On The Importance Of Building Positive Relationships With Students.

May 19, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My Latest BAM! Radio Show Is On What’s Wrong With Prof. Dev. & How To Fix It

Why Is Professional Development So Bad: How Do We Fix It? is the topic of my latest ten-minute BAM! Radio Show.

I’m joined in the conversation by Heather Wolpert-Gawron, Diana Laufenberg, Dina Strasser, and Debbie Silver, who have also all contributed written commentaries to my Education Week Teacher column.

I’m adding this show to All My BAM Radio Shows – Linked With Descriptions.

May 19, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

 

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The 50 Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Edji looks like a very cool tool for annotating online text. Students can use various tools, including leaving audio comments. I’m adding it to The Best Applications For Annotating Websites.

Lasso lets up to five people collaborate on curating web resources.  It could be useful for students collaborating in group projects.

Book Club lets you share the books you read and what you think of them.  It could be an easy place for students to record their reading history and look at their classmates’ for recommendations.

May 19, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Best” Lists Of The Week: Natural Disasters

This is the fourteenth  post in a weekly series I’m creating that will highlight the Best “Best” lists in a particular topic I have posted over the years.

You can see all those lists at the bottom of this post.

These are lists I’ve also recently reviewed and revised,  so they are up-to-date.

You can find all my nearly 2,000 continually updated “Best” lists here.

Here are the lists I’ve revised and updated that share resources on teaching and learning about Natural Disasters (NOTE: I make quite a few “Best” lists about individual natural disasters, but have not included them here – though links to them can be found in the following posts.  I don’t update those lists, though, and am only including more broader resources lists in this series):

The Best Websites For Learning About Natural Disasters

The Best Sites For Learning About Hurricanes

The Best Sites To Learn About Tsunamis

The Best Resources For Learning About The Tornadoes

The Best Video Collages Of Natural Disasters

The Best Short Video Clips About Hurricane Katrina

The Best Resources For Learning About Mudslides

The Best Sites For Learning About Volcanoes

The Best Sites For Learning About Forest Fires

A Beginning List Of The Best Resources On California’s Drought

The Best Sites For Showing Sacramento Destroyed By Floods

 

 

The previous posts in this series have been:

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Tools For Learning About Art & Creating It

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Tools For Teaching About Economics & Jobs

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Resources For Teaching About Health

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Useful Multilingual Resources

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Online Learning Games

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Resources For Writing Instruction

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Resources For Reading Instruction

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Resources For Teaching & Learning About Race & Racism

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Resources On The Environment

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Resources For Vocabulary Instruction

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Math Resources

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Social Emotional Learning Resources

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Planets & Space

May 19, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Santa Fe High School & Illusion Of An American “Can Do” Spirit

I guess the American “can do” spirit doesn’t apply to saving our students from gun violence, even though we know how to effectively deal with the problem:

And one of those solutions is not reducing the number of entrances to schools:

Vox offers additional commentary on that idea.

I’d also encourage you to read This Is School in America Now, which just appeared in The New York Times.

America’s gun problem, explained is from Vox.

Unfortunately, I’ve had to post numerous other related school shooting resources that you can find at:

A Collection Of “Best” Lists Related To Schools, Students & The Fight Against Gun Violence

 

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