Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 23, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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January’s (2015) Best Tweets — Part Four

'Twitter' photo (c) 2010, West McGowan - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every month I make a few short lists highlighting my choices of the best resources I through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog.

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page.

You might also be interested in The Best Tweets Of 2014 — So Far and The Best Tweets Of 2014 — Part Two.

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January 22, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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PBS News Hour Video: “Is The ‘Test’ Failing American Schools”

Anya Kamenetz, NPR reporter and author of The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing, But You Don’t Have to Be was interviewed on the PBS News Hour tonight.

Here’s the video and and a text excerpt. I’m adding this post to The Best Posts On How To Prepare For Standardized Tests (And Why They’re Bad).

And-as-for-the-argument

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January 22, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New TED-Ed Video & Lesson: “Why the Arctic is climate change’s canary in the coal mine”

Yesterday, I posted Scary Video: “Arctic ice age, 1987-2014.”

Today, TED-Ed published a video and lesson titled Why the Arctic is climate change’s canary in the coal mine:

I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

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January 22, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A New – To Me – Blog That Is Definitely Worth Reading: “Cult Of Pedagogy”

cult

I don’t have a very lengthy blogroll on my sidebar — blogs that I strongly recommend that people follow because I find almost all of their posts thoughtful, useful and very accessible (I’ll reproduce that full list at the end of this post).

Recently, I discovered a new blog that I’m adding there. It’s called Cult of Pedagogy, and it’s written by educator Jennifer Gonzalez.

I heard about it via John Norton and Middleweb (also on my blogroll!) through her post there titled 8 Things I Know for Sure about Middle School Kids.

I’ve since explored her extensive site and blog, and have shared quite a few of her resources in my “Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week” feature.

Her blog posts and videos are insightful and very, very practical. Here’s an example of one of her videos, and I’m adding this one to The Best Resources About Inductive Learning & Teaching. It’s about “Concept Attainment,” which I’ve written about a lot in this blog and in my books. In her video, Jennifer explains it much more clearly than I ever have in my writing:

You can see more of her fantastic videos here.

You might be wondering, “Who is Jennifer Gonzalez?” Here’s how she describes herself on her blog:

For eight years, I taught middle school language arts. Half that time was spent in an east-coast state, the other half in a Midwestern state. I earned my National Board Certification in 2004. Then, after having my first child, I left teaching to be a stay-at-home mom, knowing there was no way I could do both jobs well. In 2008, I was hired by a local university to teach pre-service teachers. This work gave me new passion for preparing and supporting educators.

So, I’d encourage you to read it regularly and you can also follow her on Twitter.

And, if you’re interested, here is my entire blogroll (which includes my classroom blogs):

BLOGROLL

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January 22, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New App “Seesaw” Is A “Learning Journal” For Students

seesaw

I’ve previously posted several times about how much I love the Shadow Puppet app — there isn’t anything out there that’s an easier tool for creating a quick audio-narrated slideshow. It’s perfect for English Language Learners.

Today, the company behind Shadow Puppet has just released another new and free educational app that looks like it could be very useful. It’s called Seesaw, and basically lets students easily create digital portfolios that can be shared with teachers and parents. It’s free for teachers and students, and has a free and paid version for parents.

I’ve embedded a video about it below. If all your students are using tablets or smartphones in your class, it seems to me that this could be an exceptionally helpful app.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

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January 21, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Online Encyclopedia Might Have Potential

dk

DK Find Out! is a new free online encyclopedia that seems to have a lot of good content that is very accessible to English Language Learners.

I was intrigued when I received their press release about the new site because I have a high opinion of their online atlas which is also free (though you have to register to access it — registration takes about five seconds).

Unfortunately, since their encyclopedia is so new, it’s missing a lot of important content. But once they beef it up a bit, I think it could be very useful to teachers and students a like.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Reference Websites For English Language Learners

The Best Search Engines For ESL/EFL Learners

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January 21, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: Teacher Gives Testimony To Senate Committee

Stephen Lazar, a New York City public school teacher, gave powerful testimony today at The U.S. Senate Education Committee that is considering re-writing the No Child Left Behind Act.

You’ll want to read his entire testimony, but here’s a short excerpt:

I-support-the-position

I’m adding this post to The Best Resources On The No Child Left Behind Reauthorization Process and to The Best Articles Describing Alternatives To High-Stakes Testing.

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January 21, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Managing Classrooms By ‘Teaching Students, Not Subjects’”

Managing Classrooms By ‘Teaching Students, Not Subjects’ is Part Two in my Education Week Teacher series on positive classroom management strategies.

In it, Kelly Bergman, Patty O’Grady, ReLeah Lent, Barry Gilmore, and Bethany Bernasconi share their thoughts.

Here are some excerpts:

If-you-tend-to-do-most

To-begin-teachers-might

Classroom-management

My-job-as-an-educator

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