Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 21, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Teaching About Weather and Seasons” is my latest NY Times Post For ELLs

weather

Teaching About Weather and Seasons is the topic of my latest New York Times post for English Language Learners.

It discusses using jazz chants, photos and more!

I’m adding it to I’m adding it to All My NY Times Posts For English Language Learners – Linked With Descriptions.

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January 21, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New “Public Domain Project” Offers Thousands Of Free Clips & Images

publicdomain

Open Culture reports on the new Public Domain Project, which offers a growing number of tens of thousands of images and clips that can be used freely.

You can read more about it at their post and also see the video I’ve embedded below.

I’m adding this post to The Best Online Sources For Images.

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January 20, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Resources On The State Of The Union

I’ll be adding plenty of more resources to The Best (& Most Intriguing) Resources For Learning About The State Of The Union Message in a few hours, but here are a few new ones:

The Chances That A State Of The Union Proposal Becomes Law is a chart from Five Thirty-Eight.

The real state of the union, in 33 maps and charts is from Vox.

Here’s the text of President Obama’s 2015 speech.

Geography Of The State Of The Union is from The Washington Post.

History through the president’s words is another infographic from The Washington Post.

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January 20, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Statistic Of The Day: Eat Your Fruits & Vegetables!

The Grapes of Contentment is an article in The Pacific Standard about a new study on nutrition.

Here’s an excerpt:

For-both-men-and-women

It could be another addition to the lesson in my forthcoming book that helps student develop intrinsic motivation for eating more healthy.

I’m adding this post to The Best Sites For Learning About Nutrition & Food Safety.

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January 20, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My New BAM! Radio Show Is On Differentiation

diffinst

My latest BAM! Radio show features a ten minute conversation with two well-known experts on the topic of differentiated instruction — Laura Robb and Regie Routman.

They’ve also contributed written responses to one of my upcoming Education Week Teacher columns.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

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January 20, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My Interview With NPR: “For the First Time, Majority of Public School Students Live in Poverty”

I was interviewed — briefly — on NPR this morning about the new study finding that 51 percent of U.S. public school students now come from low-income families.

You can read a lot more about that new research at my previous post, “Majority of U.S. public school students are in poverty” (Depending On How You Define “Poverty”).

I’m embedding the interview below, and you can also go to the site itself and leave comments, as some have already done…

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January 20, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New “Warm-Ups” I’m Doing With My English Language Learners

I’ve written before about different types of “warm-ups” I use with my two-hour (in other words, two-period) combination Beginning and Intermediate English Language Learners at the beginning of each of my periods with them (see Here’s A New Reading Activity I Tried Out Today That Went Pretty Well… and Instructional strategies for multi-level classes of English language learners).

In periods when we have access to the computer lab, we meet there and students immediately log-on (well, “immediately” might not be an accurate term — it takes awhile for our older computers to get there :) ) to either Duolingo, Raz-Kids, English Central or Quill. All those sites let teachers create virtual classrooms where teachers can monitor student progress either for free or for relatively low-cost, and students like them.

On Fridays, we do versions of the activities I described in the two links found at the beginning of this post.

During other periods, I’ve been doing another activity that has been going very well.

First, after consulting with students about personal preferences, I paired-up an intermediate ELL with a beginner and they now sit right next to each other at the start of the class. I had identified one book that was accessible to Intermediates (but where they could still learn from) and to Beginners (we had a lot of Facts & Figures, Fourth Edition Reading & Vocabulary Development 1 lying around in the bookroom and Themes For Today will be the next one when we finish Facts and Figures). I have the numbers of a page or two  on the board, and students immediately begin working on them (a student starts passing out the books prior to the bell ringing). I had spoken to the Intermediates about their role as “teachers” prior to doing these warm-ups, and they had enthusiastically agreed (we had also discussed what it meant in practice to be a “teacher” as opposed to someone who just gave the answers).

I walk around class answering questions during the time students are working, and everyone is pretty engaged.  Most of the intermediates take their role as teachers pretty seriously, and they are also clearly learning from the book, too. After ten or fifteen minutes, the books are collected and then the Beginners move to the back and turn their desks to the back window, the intermediates come to the front, and the next part of our class begins.

It’s just one more way to get a large and potentially chaotic class off to a good start…

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