Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

June 20, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Ed Tech Digest

Two years ago, in another somewhat futile attempt to reduce the backlog of resources I want to share, I began this occasional “Ed Tech Digest” post where I share three or four links I think are particularly useful and related to…ed tech:

7 Simple Ways to Use Technology With Purpose is by AJ Juliani. I’m adding it to The Best Advice On Using Education Technology.

What It Takes to Move From ‘Passive’ to ‘Active’ Tech Use in K-12 Schools is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to the same list.

State-of-the-art education software often doesn’t help students learn more, study finds is from The Hechinger Report. I’m adding it to The Best Research Available On The Use Of Technology In Schools.

Teachers Are Starting to Use Snapchat. Should You? is from Ed Week.

June 20, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“The Fiscal Ship” May Be A Useful Learning Game

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The Fiscal Ship was just named of one the top games at the Serious Play Conference.

It’s a surprisingly accessible and engaging interactive about (yawn) fiscal policy and the federal budget.

Though the majority of its backers appear to be conservative groups, the sponsoring group includes a few others, too. I didn’t play the game all the way through; however, what I did get through seemed to be relatively even-handed without pushing a particular agenda.

If you go through the whole thing, I’d be interested in hearing if the game maintains that fair perspective.

Here’s a video introduction:

June 20, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Statistic Of The Day: Numbers of Immigrant Students Will Continue To Grow

Cross-Generational Differences in Educational Outcomes in the Second Great Wave of Immigration is the title of a new study from The American Institutes For Research.

There seems to me to be two key findings from the study.

Here’s the first:

Immigrants-and-children

The second conclusion is depressing: they found that the academic performance of first, second and third generations Hispanic and Asian students (at least those they studied in Florida for the report) got progressively worse.

The authors say that exploring the reasons for that deterioration and what can be done about it are “beyond the scope” of their study, though it seems not particularly responsible to duck those issues when you have those kinds of blockbuster findings – especially in the political climate today.

What are your thoughts on the research?

June 20, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2016 – So Far

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I use short, funny video clips a lot when I’m teaching ELLs, and you can read in detail about how I use them in The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them). In short, there are many ways to use them that promote speaking, listening, writing and reading (including having students describe – in writing and verbally – a chronological description of what they saw).

I’ve posted a few of them during the first half of this year, and I thought it would be useful to readers — and to me — if I brought them together in one post.

I’m adding this list to All Mid-Year 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place.

I’ve also published quite a few during the previous nine years of this blog. You can find those in these lists:

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2015 – So Far

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2014 – Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2013 — So Far

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2012 (Part Two)

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2012 (Part One)

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2011

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2010

Part Two Of The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2009

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2009

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2008

The Best Movie Scenes To Use For English-Language Development

The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual Or Multilingual — Part One

The Best Pink Panther Fight Scenes For English Language Learners

The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner

The Best Sports Videos To Use With English Language Learners

The Best Video Clips Of Sneaky Critters

The Best Videos Showing “Thinking Outside The Box” — Help Me Find More

The Best Fun Videos To Teach Language Conventions — Help Me Find More

The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More

The Best Movie Scenes For Halloween

The Best Christmas Videos For English Language Learners – Help Me Find More

Okay, now here are my choices for The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2016 — So Far:

I’m adding this video to The Best Sites To Learn About Pandas:

Video clips of sneaky critters are great ones to show to English Language Learners to get them to describe — verbally and in writing — what they see. I also use them to in my IB Theory of Knowledge class for a discussion about if animals have ethics:

Astronaut Scott Kelly at the International Space Station filmed himself in a gorilla suit chasing Tim Peake:

The Present from Jacob Frey on Vimeo.

Desert Critters from Li Wen Toh on Vimeo.

A Small Escape from David Sandell on Vimeo.

Every Best Visual Effects Winner. Ever. from Burger Fiction on Vimeo.

The humor exhibited in this Darth Santa spoof would be a big hit for many teenage boys who are English Language Learners, and I suspect others would enjoy it, too (note that there are a few seconds showing him drinking). Students can watch it and describe verbally and writing what they saw:

June 20, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Today Is World Refugee Day – Here Are New Resources

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Today is World Refugee Day.

Here are a few more resources I’m adding to my extensive The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day:

The world’s least developed countries are also the ones hosting the most refugees is from Quartz.

Refugees, Displaced People Surpass 60 Million For First Time, UNHCR Says is from NPR.

A Refugee Record is from The Atlantic.

June 19, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2016 – So Far

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It’s time for another of my mid-year  “Best” lists (you can see all 1,600 “The Best…” lists here).

I’m adding this one to All Mid-Year 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2015 – So Far

The Best Articles, Posts & Videos On Education Policy In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2014 – So Far

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2013 — Part Two

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) On Education Policy In One Place

All My 2012 “The Best…” Lists On Education Policy In One Place

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Polcy In 2011 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy — 2010

The “Best” Articles (And Blog Posts) About Education Policy — 2009

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2008

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2016 – So Far (let me know what you think I’m missing) – these are not listed in any order of preference (I’m starting off with links to “Best” lists I’ve posted over the past few months that relate to ed policy):

The Best Resources For Understanding The Every Student Succeeds Act

The Best Resources On Student Absenteeism

The Best Resources For Learning About The Multilingual Education Act Ballot Initiative In California

The Best Resources For Learning About The Ins & Outs Of Reclassifying ELLs

The Best Resources For Learning About “Deeper Learning”

The Best Resources On Student Agency & How To Encourage It

The “Best” Lists Of Recommendations About What “Effective” Teachers Do

The Best Resources For Learning How The Every Student Succeeds Act Affects English Language Learners

The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2015

The Best Education Predictions For 2016

The Best Articles For Beginning To Understand Zuckerberg’s Announced $45 Billion “Charitable” Gift

The Best “Fair Isn’t Equal” Visualizations

Slate is published an impressive series of twelve long articles on race and schools – all in one week – and called Tomorrow’s Test. You can access all of them at the bottom of that introductory article.

Does Teaching Experience Increase Teacher Effectiveness? A Review of the Research is from The Learning Policy Institute. I’m adding it to The Best Articles For Helping To Understand Both Why Teacher Tenure Is Important & The Reasons Behind Seniority-Based Layoffs.

Why so many people are worried about teacher diversity, in two charts is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism.

Competing Strands Of Educational Reform Policy: Can Collaborative School Reform and Teacher Evaluation Reform Be Reconciled? is a new and important paper from The Shanker Institute. It raises more questions than provides answers, but they’re very important questions.

School Funding Maps:  Hot on the heels of NPR publishing an impressive interactive on school funding across the United States, The New York Times unveiled one that looks even more impressive. Go to their Money, Race and Success: How Your School District Compares page, pop in the name of your school district, and it will vividly demonstrate how students in that district compare with others in academic achievement, school funding, and ethnic make-up of the student population.

Advancing Deeper Learning Under ESSA: Seven Priorities is from Stanford. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About “Deeper Learning.”

When School Districts Get Deliberate About Desegregation is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About School Desegregation (& Segregation) – Help Me Find More.

Another Flaw In Using Value-Added Measurement For Teacher Evaluation is a post I wrote about an important recent study.  My blog post itself is not really worthy of inclusion in this list, but the study combined with the little context I give is important.

The Harvard Business Review – of all places – has published what I think is the most thorough and devastating critique that I’ve seen of performance pay – see Stop Paying Executives for Performance. It’s targeting executive pay but, with a few minor changes in wording, the article can be applied to teacher pay and evaluation, as well as student assessment. It’s short, and definitely worth the read.

“Throwing money at the problem” may actually work in education is from The Washington Center For Equitable Growth. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning That Money Does Matter For Schools.

A Community Organizer’s Definition Of Leadership – How Can It Be Applied To Education? (Part One) is a post I wrote that people might find useful.

Stop Humiliating Teachers is a great new essay at The New Yorker. I’m definitely adding it to The Best Articles Providing An “Overall” Perspective On Education Policy.

Comparing Paper-Pencil and Computer Test Scores: 7 Key Research Studies is an important article over at Education Week (Report: Kids who took Common Core test online scored lower than those who used paper is a similar one at The Washington Post).

Stop repeating nonsense about ‘bad’ teachers. Just. Stop it. is from Icing On The Cake. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

Chicago Public Schools teachers and students need more than loveis by Ray Salazar.

Help wanted: California school districts scramble to hire teachers is a nice article by reporter Diana Lambert appearing in The Sacramento Bee today. It features how our school supports student teachers (created by Jim Peterson and Ted Appel), and you can read more about it at thethree-part series at my Education Week Teacher column on…how to support student teachers.

Ranking Is Not Measuring is by Peter Greene. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

New Study Suggests That Teacher Observations Should Focus More On Teacher Inputs, Less On Student Outcomes is a post I wrote that is on this “Best” list primarily because of some of the context it provides to links in it.

New Report: Does Money Matter in Education? Second Edition is from The Shanker Institute. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning That Money Does Matter For Schools.

New Study Finds Big Results From Ethnic Studies Classes

Statistic Of The Day: How Much Do Teachers Spend Out Of Their Own Pockets For Supplies?

Video: Jonathan Kozol On Savage Inequalities

The Myth of Unions’ Overprotection of Bad Teachers: Evidence from the District-Teacher Matched Panel Data on Teacher Turnover is a new research paper I learned about through The Shanker Institute. Here’s an excerpt:

The data confirms that, compared to districts with weak unionism, districts with strong unionism dismiss more low-quality teachers and retain more high-quality teachers. The empirical analysis shows that this dynamic of teacher turnover in highly unionized districts raises average teacher quality and improves student achievement.

Study Finds Teachers Whose Students Achieve High Test Scores Often Don’t Do As Well With SEL Skills

June 19, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2015 – Part Two):

Having Other Teachers’ Eyes Means Also Having Their Ideas is from NPR. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Professional Development For Teachers — Help Me Find More.

Meet the New Leader of Chicago’s Principals Who’s Taking on Rahm Emanuel and Corporate School Reform is from In These Times (thanks to Alexander Russo for the tip).

UNDERSTANDING THE COMMON CORE: WHAT IT IS, WHAT IT ISN’T is from The 74.  I’m adding it to A Collection Of My “Best” Lists On The Common Core.

The Exit Exam Paradox: Did States Raise Standards So High They Then Had to Lower the Bar to Graduate? is by Matt Barnum. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Why High School Exit Exams Might Not Be A Good Idea.

I’m adding this tweet to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Achievement Gap” (or “Opportunity Gap”):

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