Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 13, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
4 Comments

Can You Help Me Find Research On How Writing Strengthens The Brain?

I’ve written a lot about how learning in general strengthens the brain and reading’s effects on the brain (see The Best Resources For Showing Students That They Make Their Brain Stronger By Learning).

In addition, I’ve written a lot about recent research finding how handwriting in particular helps brain development (see The Best Resources For Learning About Handwriting & Learning).

Now, I’m looking for research documenting how writing of any kind might strengthen the brain.

Does anyone have suggestions?

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July 13, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources For Understanding “Personalized Learning”

When the last Race To The Top applications came out, its focus on the idea of “personalized learning” prompted me to create a The Best Resources On “Race To The Top” (& On “Personalized Learning”) list.

Now, though, I think it’s time to make the topic a “Best” list of its own…

I’ve got a number of concerns, and a fair amount of skepticism, about what’s passing as “personalized learning” these days, and this collection reflects it. Feel free to make your own suggestions in the comments:

“Personalized Learning,” Race To The Top & Putting Even More Lipstick On A Pig

Another Good Take On “Personalized Learning”

Personalization is by Chris Lehmann.

Dan Meyer On Personalization is by…Dan Meyer.

‘Personalized Learning’ Varies for Race to Top Districts is from Education Week.

Quote Of The Day: Personalized Learning

The Soaring Promise Of Big Data In Math Education is by Dan Meyer.

Gates and Murdoch “Personalize” Learning with Larger Classes and Big Data Systems is by Anthony Cody at Education Week.

Rebirth of the Teaching Machine through the Seduction of Data Analytics: This Time It’s Personal is by Philip McRae.

This Time It’s Personal and Dangerous is by Barbara Bray.

 

The History of “Personalization” and Teaching Machines is by Audrey Watters.

Betting Big on Personalized Learning is from Education Week

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July 13, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

July’s Infographics & Interactives Galore – Part Three

There are just so many good infographics and interactives out there that I’ve begun a new semi-regular feature called “Infographics & Interactives Galore.”

You can see others at A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics and by searching “infographics” on this blog.

I’ll still be publishing separate posts to individually highlight especially useful infographics and interactives, but you’ll find others in this regular feature.

Usually, I just publish one of these posts each week, but I’m trying to catch up on a backlog of good infographics, so this is sort of a “special edition.”

Here goes:

UNESCO has a nice collection of education-related infographics.

How Birth Year Influences Political Views is an interactive from The New York Times.

Young Vs Old: Which Countries Have The Youngest Populations? is an interactive from Radio Free Europe. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Our World’s Population Of 7 Billion.

I’m adding this next one to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions:

This infographic is being added to The Best Resources On The Dangers Of Multitasking:

Please Include Attribution to OnlineCollege.org With This Graphic
Multitasking Infographic

I’m adding this next infographic to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures:

On the Sauce

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July 13, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Latest Resources On Child Refugees At U.S.-Mexico Border

July 13, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

 

I’ve started a somewhat regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention:

Ala. Puts Stop to Enrollment Policies That Discriminate Against Immigrants is from Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources To Learn About Alabama’s Awful Immigration Law (& Its Impact On Schools).

Guezzit looks like an intriguing game that can be played as a mobile app or as a Facebook application. I haven’t had time to try it out, but one of its features is a picture quiz for players to identify the correct descriptive words. Trying it is on my “to do” list, but if you get a chance to experiment with it, let me know if I’m right in my hunch that it could have potential for English Language Learners.

I’m a fan of having ELLS use online video games as a language learning activity. Escape From The Room With Framed Pictures is the latest game I’d have students use for this goal, and you can find its walkthrough here. Be sure to click on “English” for language.

4 fun and motivating grammar activities for beginner classes is by Adam Simpson. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Grammar Practice.

The British Council shares a number of good listening activities to do in class. I’m adding it to The Best Listening Sites For English Language Learners.

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July 12, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Three Good Resources On Assessment

I have all my “Best” lists on assessment at A Collection Of “The Best” Lists On Assessment, and here some new ones I’m adding to specific ones:

Beyond the Bubble Test: Why We Need Performance Assessments is by Linda Darling-Hammond and appeared at Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Performance Assessment.

Grading Exceptional Learners: This five-step model provides fair and accurate grades for students with disabilities and English language learners is by Lee Ann Jung and Thomas R. Guskey. Thanks to Judie Haynes for the tip. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Grading Practices.

What’s in a Grade? is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to the same list.

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July 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Cost Of Living Map” Is A Nice Interactive

col

The Cost of Living Map lets you pick any two major cities in the United States and it compares their costs of living — overall and in specific categories.

It’s very, very easy to use, and could be very helpful to students. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning Economics & Practical Money Skills.

Thanks to Google Maps Mania for the tip.

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July 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Thesaurus.Land” Looks Like A Helpful Tool

thesaurus

Thanks to a tweet from Eric T. MacKnight, I’ve learned about a new site called Thesaurus.Land.

It’s an online…thesaurus, and a pretty neat one. You type in a word, as I did with the word “sad” in the above image. Once you click on the arrow/triangle to the left of each word, it will show you synonyms for each one of them.

I’m adding it to The Best Reference Websites For English Language Learners.

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July 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Education Policy

Here are some useful posts and articles on educational policy issues:

‘Innovation’ Schools Get a Chance to Shake Up the Rules is from WNYC in New York City.

Departure of Official Is Sought by Teachers is from The New York Times.

A Draft Bill of Research Rights for Educators is by Daniel Willingham. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research.

Which Education Research Is Worth the Hype? is from The Education Writers Association. I’m adding it to the same list.

Gates’ Excuse for Poor Results of Educational Technology: “Unmotivated Students” and A Question for Bill Gates: How Can We Motivate Students When Their Futures Are Bleak? are both by Anthony Cody at Ed Week. I’m adding them to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students.

A Return to ‘Balanced Literacy’? is from Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Balanced Literacy & The “Reading Wars.”

Connecting school spending and student achievement is an article in The Washington Post about a really weird “return on investment” ranking of most school districts in the U.S.

Here are several additions to California Court Rules It’s All The Teachers’ Fault, where I’ve been collecting commentaries on the Vergara court decision:

Grounding Vergara In The Realities of Teaching in California is from Ed Week.

For Vergara Ruling on Teachers, Big Questions Loom is also from Ed Week.

Guest Post: In Defense of “Last-In, First-Out” is from on labor.

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July 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Resources On The Child Refugee Crisis At U.S. Border

Here are some new additions to The Best Resources For Learning About The Children Refugee Crisis At The U.S. Southern Border:

The Children Crossing Our Border Just Want a Better Life—Let’s Treat Them as Our Own is by Jose Luis Vilson.

Fleeing Gangs, Children Head to U.S. Border is from The New York Times.

Book Drive Seeks To Give Immigrant Kids Chance To ‘Daydream’ is from NBC News. You can also access a special section they have on all their stories about the refugee crisis.

What happens when deportation separates parents from their kids? is from Vox.

Here’s a short video explainer from Vox:

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July 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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July’s Infographics & Interactives Galore – Part Two

There are just so many good infographics and interactives out there that I’ve begun a new semi-regular feature called “Infographics & Interactives Galore.”

You can see others at A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics and by searching “infographics” on this blog.

I’ll still be publishing separate posts to individually highlight especially useful infographics and interactives, but you’ll find others in this regular feature.

Here goes:

3 maps that explain America is from Vox. Two of the are pretty interesting and regard immigration, so I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States.

Adolescent screen time, in four charts is from The Washington Post.

The Daily Routines Of Famous Creative People might be one of the intriguing interactives of the year.

South Sudan: how the crisis unfolded – interactive timeline is from The Guardian. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The Vote In Southern Sudan.

Top 10 Biodiversity Conservation Infographics is from Saving Species. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For World Biodiversity Day (& Endangered Species Day).

I’m adding this next infographic to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures:

21 Ways to Say Hello

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July 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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July’s Best Tweets — Part Two

'Twitter' photo (c) 2010, West McGowan - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every month I make a few short lists highlighting my choices of the best resources I through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog.

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page.

You might also be interested in The Best Tweets Of 2014 — So Far.

I use Storify to “curate” my best tweets:

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July 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Good Post Worth Reading: “The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies”

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies is a very good post by Maurice Elias (who has often contributed to my Ed Week column) over at Edutopia.

It’s a definite addition to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions.

And, speaking of asking questions, next week you’ll be able to read an interview I did with Warren Berger about his new book, A More Beautiful Question. I’ve previously written about his work.

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July 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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If You Were Going To Read Just One Thing About Bloom’s Taxonomy, Then “What’s Old Is New Again” Would Be It

Scott McLeod just sent out a tweet about a forty page PDF document titled “Bloom’s Taxonomy: What’s Old Is New Again.” It’s written by Cecelia Munzenmaier, MS, with Nancy Rubin, PhD.

I’ve got a lot of resources on The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom list, but this document provides the best overview and must up-to-date history — and how to implement it in the classroom, that I’ve seen anywhere.

Granted, it’s forty pages, and that might be more than many want to read, but it is clearly worth the time and the effort.

It’s a definite addition to my “Best” list.

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