Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

May 28, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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May’s Updated “Best” Lists

I am constantly adding new resources to my over 1,700 categorized “Best Lists.

I also regularly “cull” through the lists to weed-out dead links, but haven’t been very systematic about doing that task.

So, I’ve started to go through them and highlight the ones that I’ve gotten around to completely cleaning-up and revising. I’ve completed this process with nearly 300 lists over the past twelve months.

Here are a list of them from this month (you can see previous compilations here):

The Best Tools To Make Simple Graphs Online

The Best Sites To Learn About The Internet

The Best Websites For Learning About Memorial Day

The Best Resources For Learning About The “Freedom Riders”

The Best Interactives Showing How Long Our Non-Renewables Will Last

The Best Sites For Learning About The Korean War

The Best Sites For Learning About Penguins

May 28, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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May’s Top Posts From This Blog

 

I regularly highlight my picks for the most useful posts for each month — not including “The Best…” lists. I also use some of them in a more extensive monthly newsletter I send-out. You can see older Best Posts of the Month at Websites Of The Month (more recent lists can be found here).

You can also see my all-time favorites here. I’ve also been doing “A Look Back” series in anticipation of this blog’s tenth anniversary in February.

Here are some of the posts I personally think are the best, and most helpful, ones I’ve written during this past month (not in any order of preference). There are a lot of them this month:

Here’s What I’m Doing As A Final With Beginning ELLs

“The Best Teaching Advice is…”

How My ELL Students Used Padlet To Create A “Picture Data Set”

My Last BAM! Radio Show For This School Year Is On Flipped Learning

Two New & Very Useful Writing Frames For Teachers & Students

Two Important Reports On Education Released Today

Read, Listen, Watch New Orleans Mayor’s Speech On The Removal Of Confederate Monuments

“Four ways to encourage speaking in the ELL classroom” Is My New British Council Post

“Teaching can be Tough, but We’re Also ‘Lucky’”

No Surprise: Study Finds Immigrant Students Have Trouble Concentrating When Laws Are Passed Attacking Them

I Talk About My Biggest Teaching Mistake In This Radio Interview

I’ll Be Writing Another Book This Summer

“Tech Helps us ‘be a Little Less Common & go far Beyond the Core’”

New Book Excerpt: Supporting ELL Students With Interrupted Formal Education

Big Meta-Analysis Says Four Teaching Strategies Are Most Effective For Low-Income Students

NPR Announces New Science Podcast For Kids & Their Parents

“Ways to Promote Transfer of Learning”

“Learning ‘Transfer is our Collective Goal’”

Six New Videos Teaching Bloom’s Taxonomy In Creative Ways

New Research Suggests That “Community Trust” Enhances Self-Control & Long-Term Thinking

“Equity for Rural Schools is ‘Often Ignored’”

“History does not move on the machinations of a select group of great people”

President Trump & The Civil War

How Are You Using Instagram For Teaching & Learning?

Guest Post: How One District Supports Personalized Learning

“Transfer Of Learning” & Elon Musk

NY Times Learning Network Announces Their Fabulous Annual Summer Reading Contest

My Latest BAM! Radio Show Is On Teaching As A Second Career

This Is Intriguing – Now Anyone Can Create A Class In Google Classroom

 

May 28, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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SEL Weekly Update

I’ve recently begun this weekly post where I’ll be sharing resources I’m adding to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources or other related “Best” lists:

The National Association Of State Boards of Education has released a policy update on Social Emotional Learning.

Reviewing Social and Emotional Learning for ESSA: MOOSES, not Parrots is by Robert Slavin.

Forget Grit. Focus on Inequality. appeared in Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About “Grit.”

Is mindfulness meditation good for kids? Here’s what the science actually says. is from Vox. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Mindfulness In The Classroom.

Growth mindset: teaching panacea or classroom pitfall? is from TES. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

The Scientific Reason Flow Obliterates Time is from The Big Think. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About “Flow.”

Stanford Researchers Discover a Smarter Way to Prepare for Exams: Introducing MetaCognition, the Art of Thinking About Your Thinking is from Open Culture. I’m adding it to Best Posts On Metacognition.

May 28, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Here’s What I’m Doing As A Final With Beginning ELLs

I’ve previously shared what I’ve done for final exams in my Intermediate English Language Learner class (see My Revised Final Exams (And An Important Lesson).

This year, I was successful in implementing a bit more rigor in my Beginning ELL class, so I’m modifying the Intermediate Final and using it there (for most, though not all, of the students – students who arrived late in the year will do a far more simple assignment).

First, I’ll ask students to define a few terms: hook, thesis statement, topic sentence, conclusion, quotation marks. Here’s the sheet you can download.

Next, students will review all the essays they’ve written this year and choose two of them – one, preferably from earlier in the year and the other, preferably, a later one. They’ll they analyze each essay using an “improvement rubric.” This kind of rubric, unlike most, does not utilize deficit language and emphasizes what students have done instead of what they have not done. You can read more about improvement rubrics at “Instead of seeing students as Far Below Basic or Advanced, we see them as learners.” You can download the rubric my students will be using here, and here’s a partial screenshot of what it looks like:Final for beginners vocabulary words-1kg0j3j

Final for beginners improvement rubric-2e4415q

 

Then, students will complete a short series of reflection questions, which you can download here.  The questions are:

1) Look at the scores you gave yourself on both essays. Overall, which essay was your strongest? Why?

2) Look at the scores on your strongest essay. What did you do well?

3) Look at the scores on your strongest essay. What are 3 things you need to get better at next year?

4) In what areas of your writing would you like Mr. Ferlazzo or Ms Buric to help you with next year?

Lastly, students will then choose one of those two essays to revise and rewrite.

I’m always open to hearing suggestions on how I can make it better!

I’m adding this post to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

May 28, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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May’s “Best” Lists – There Are Now 1,721 Of Them

Here’s my regular round-up of new “The Best…” lists I posted this month (you can see all 1,721 of them categorized here):

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2017 – So Far

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Opposites

All My Thematic “Best” Lists For Beginning ELLs – In One Place!

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Community, Signs & Transportation

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2017 – So Far

The Best Resources For Learning & Teaching About Malcolm X

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017 – So Far

A Beginning List Of The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The North Korea Missile Crisis

The Best Resources On Class Instruction In 2017 – So Far

The Best Guest Posts Appearing On This Blog In 2017 – So Far

The Best Resources For Learning About Cognitive Bias

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2017 – So Far

All Mid-Year 2017 “Best” Lists In One Place

Most Popular Posts From This Blog In 2017 – So Far

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2017 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – So Far

The Best Resources For Learning About The Value Of “Self-Explanation”

The Best Ways To Handle Fidget Spinners

The Twenty-Five Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017 – So Far

The Best Advice On Protecting Our Digital Info

May 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week

Each week, I publish a post or two containing three or four particularly useful resources on classroom instruction, and you can see them all here.

You might also be interested in The Best Articles (& Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2016 – Part Two andThe Best Resources On Class Instruction In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s picks:

A Powerful Way to End the School Year is by Dr. Donna Wilson and Marcus Conyers. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Finish The School Year Strong.

Wrapping Up the School Year: 5 Reflective End-of-Year Activities is from The Teaching Channel. I’m adding it to the same list.

Why Inquiry Fails is a useful post by Dave Wees about math instruction.
Fidget Spinners CAN be a fantastic teaching resource! is from Ed Tech For Beginners. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Handle Fidget Spinners.

Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain: An Interview With Zaretta Hammond is from Corwin. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About “Culturally Responsive Teaching” & “Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy” – Please Share More!

Reader Idea | Building Community Through Shared Immigration Stories is from The New York Times Learning Network. It shares a fairly common lesson, but I’m sure some are not familiar with it. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States.

6 Steps To Create Effective Seating Plans is from Teacher Toolkit. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Classroom Seating Strategies.  Thanks to Dr. Anael Alston for the tip.

Melissa Kaufman, a student in a Boston University class taught by Travis Bristol, has created a useful site called “Teaching in the Age of Trump.”

Jose Carlos Haro Preciado is a student in Bret Gosselin‘s high school class. Jose has created a nice resource on How To Write A Poem, and I’m adding it to The Best World Poetry Day Resources – Help Me Find More.  A little more about Jose: Jose Carlos Haro Preciado is currently a student at Coppell High School. He is from Mexico where he lived until moving to the United States two years ago as a sophomore. He is an ambitious student who uses his writing as a way to learn from the world around him. He believes that by hard work, he can learn to do anything well, including English. He plans to go to college to become an engineer and is a valued member of Coppell’s champion-winning varsity soccer team.

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