Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 30, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources For Learning About The Blue Moon

From CNN:

If anything unusual happens to you Friday, you’ll be right to say it was “once in a blue moon.”

The July 31 appearance of the month’s second full moon will be the first such occurrence in the Americas since August 2012. Every month has a full moon, but because the lunar cycle and the calendar year aren’t perfectly synched, about every three years we wind up with two in the same calendar month.

But Earth’s satellite will most likely not appear blue at all.

Here are some additional resources on Friday’s event:

Thought to be called

Source SPACE.com: All about our solar system, outer space and exploration

You might also be interested in these other moon-related “Best” lists:

The Best Sites To Learn About The Apollo 11 Moon Landing

 

The Best Resources About The “Supermoon”

The Best Resources For “Moon Day”

The Best Resources For Learning About The Blood Moon

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July 30, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: “Relearning the Art of Asking Questions”

Relearning the Art of Asking Questions is a new article appearing in The Harvard Business Review.

It talks about dividing questions into four categories: clarifying, adjoining, funneling and elevating. With all the different taxonomy of questions that we have already, I’m not sure that another one is needed. But it’s worth thinking about….

Here’s an excerpt:

Think-back-to-your-time

I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions.

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July 30, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I’ve recently begin a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2015 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

7 Good Options for Building Digital Portfolios – A PDF Handout is from Richard Byrne. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Developing Student Portfolios.

FreeConferenceCall.com comes highly recommended by Richard Byrne. I’m adding it to The Best Online Tools For Real-Time Collaboration.

Sketchlot lets teachers create virtual classrooms for their students, who can then create drawings or other products on an online whiteboard that can be monitored by their teachers. I’m adding it to The Best Art Websites For Learning English and to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress. Thanks to – who else? – Richard Byrne for the tip.

Showbox, a new online video-editing platform isn’t open to the public yet, but it sounds like it could be a game-changer.

I’m adding this tweet to The Best Online Sources For Images:

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July 30, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Resources On Race & Racism

BLM Banner 2 Justin Norman via Compfight

Here are new additions to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More:

Are Americans More Pessimistic About Race—or More Realistic? is from The Atlantic.

White People 101 is also from The Atlantic.

Half of Black, Latina Scientists Mistaken For Janitors, Assistants is from NBC News.

White Educators: Do You Recognize State Trooper Encinia? is from The Synapse.

Why “All Lives Matter” instead of “Black Lives Matter” is such a stupid thing to say is from Boing Boing.

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July 29, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Let Me Know If You’re Having Trouble Downloading The Free Hand-Outs From My Student Motivation Books

As regular readers know,  the student hand-outs, and there are a lot of them, from all my books are always available for free from the publishers – with no registration required.

Routledge, the publisher of my three student motivation books, has been reconfiguring their website this week, which has disrupted the ability to download the hand-outs from my first two books (ones from the third one started working fine again today).  I’m assuming lots of their other books are having the same problem.

They say it should all be fixed this week. However, if Monday comes and you still can’t access them, leave a comment here and I’ll figure out a way to get them to you. Of course, please only let me know that if you really need them right away for the beginning of the school year (I certainly understand the need to get things set for the first couple of weeks ahead of time). If you can end wait a little longer, please do — I’m sure they’re working as hard as they can to get it all fixed up.

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July 29, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Irony Alert! College Board Caves On Same Day Petitions Delivered To Recall School Board That Wanted Changes In AP History Class

You might remember the big protests protests in Colorado in the Jefferson County School District last year becaused The School Board wanted to change the Advanced Placement history curriculum to make it more “patriotic” (see The Best Posts & Articles On The Teacher & Student Protests In Colorado).

Today, leaders of those protests were successful in submitting petitions to force a recall vote on the three board members behind that effort (see the Washington Post story, In a county that tried to amend U.S. history course, a lesson in politics and the AP article, Colorado board’s history class review leads to recall effort).

In an unbelievable ironic coincidence, at about the same time the petitions were being delivered to recall those who, against the best interests of teachers, students and their families, wanted to change the curriculum, the College Board announced changes to that very same AP History curriculum, including ones that appear to mirror some of the changes those very same Board members wanted to make:

mentions of the word slavery have been reduced, and a new section on the concept of “American exceptionalism” has been added. Some names that were omitted from last year’s framework, such as Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton and John Adams, have been added—a key sticking point for critics of the prior document, who objected to Founding Fathers being omitted and negative aspects in American history being more emphasized, they claimed, than positive periods.

That is an excerpt from the Newsweek article, Revised AP U.S. History Standards Will Emphasize American Exceptionalism.

What do you think is the lesson to our students here?

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