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Many teachers often have students begin classes with time for them to read books they choose from school or classroom libraries (see The Best Resources Documenting The Effectiveness of Free Voluntary Reading).

In addition, another option is to have students spend time either reading online books or articles or, depending on the class, having students choose sites where they can practice specific skills.

Here are a list of sites that either I have students use or that other teachers have told me they offer in this subject.  Some of the sites provide a wide variety of student choice on their platform, while others may use  Artificial Intelligence for an adaptive learning system that guides students.  I think it’s important to provide students with opportunities to choose (see The Best Posts & Articles About Providing Students With Choices).  So, if one practice site is more guided, I think it’s important to have at least one other site alternative that is either also guided or that provides more choices.

This list contains some recommendations, and I hope to hear more from readers (though some don’t require registration, I typically favor ones that require registration – usually easily done through a Google log-in – for accountability purposes).

Please note that I’m only sharing a few of my (or other teacher’s) favorites.  Each category contains a link or two to “Best” lists sharing many more for each content area.  Also, if those aren’t enough, you can find even more possibilities at The Best Sites Where Students Can Work Independently & Let Teachers Check On Progress (which I have just tried to revise and update, but may still contain a few dead links). In the following recommendations, I’ve also noted some that can be used in World Language classes.  For those courses, you might also want to explore tools at The Best Sites For Learning Spanish Online and at The Best Multilingual & Bilingual Sites For Learning English & Other Languages).

Here’s what I have so far:

 

For English Language Learners and for English classes:

Online reading of books for both ELLs and English-proficient students: Raz-Kids and Epic!

I can’t say enough positive things about Quill. It’s an amazing adaptive learning site that my ELL students can use for grammar practice.  Even though I haven’t really begun using their brand-new Reading For Evidence tool, I’m excited about trying it out next year.  I’ve also sometimes had students try-out an alternative called No Red Ink just to change things up a bit.

USA Learns is an excellent online program for learning English, as is Duolingo (which, of course, can also be used in multiple other World Language classes).

For slightly more advanced reading of shorter articles: Newsela provides several “levels” of the same newspaper articles;  ReadWorks and CommonLit.

LingoHut and Learning Chocolate are two sites that don’t require any kind of log-in, but are excellent for English Language Learners.

If your school has BrainPop, it’s great to use in all classes (including for ELLs, and for Spanish and French courses).

You can find more ideas at The Best Online Homework Sites For English Language Learners – Please Offer Your Own Suggestions and at The Best Places To Get The “Same” Text Written For Different “Levels.”

 

For Math classes:

Legends of Learning has tons of math and science games, and is free.

If your school has BrainPop, it’s great to use in all classes (including for ELLs, and for Spanish and French courses).

You can find MANY more options at The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

 

For Social Studies classes:

In my ELL Economics class, EverFi and Banzai! were excellent sites students could access on their own.

If your school has BrainPop, it’s great to use in all classes (including for ELLs, and for Spanish and French courses).

For slightly more advanced reading of shorter articles: Newsela provides several “levels” of the same newspaper articles;  ReadWorks and CommonLit.

There are many games at The Best Online Geography Games that can be played, generally without registration.

 

For Science classes:

Legends of Learning has tons of math and science games, and is free.

If your school has BrainPop, it’s great to use in all classes (including for ELLs, and for Spanish and French courses).

For slightly more advanced reading of shorter articles: Newsela provides several “levels” of the same newspaper articles;  ReadWorks and CommonLit.