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Based on recent assessments, it appears that I need to work more with my ELL Newcomer students on basic sentence construction.  About half the class seems to have a good grasp of it, while the other half (primarily composed of students who have recently joined the class) need more support.

Since the main group who are experiencing challenges are new students, it’s a pretty safe bet that they will pick it up from the typical work we are doing in class.

However, I’ve decided on to attempt to “supercharge” the process through using one of my favorite instructional strategies, “Sentence Navigators.”  You can read more about them and get tons of examples at “SENTENCE NAVIGATOR” IS JASON RENSHAW’S GIFT TO ESL/EFL/ELL TEACHERS EVERYWHERE! and at “SENTENCE NAVIGATORS” ARE GREAT LEARNING TOOLS FOR ELLS.

As you can see when you visit those posts, they are a sort of puzzle-like sentence patterning chart.

After students become more proficient using these “sentence navigators,” I will often move them into using sentence scrambles (see The Best Sites For Creating Sentence Scrambles).

The puzzle elements in both the sentence navigators and the scrambled sentences seem to get students highly engaging in the learning process. Quizizz works great for “gamifying” the sentence scrambles (see the link for an example).

CHECK OUT A NEW ADDITION I’M TRYING OUT: HOW I’M ADDING A TWIST TO THE SENTENCE EXPANSION STRATEGY IN MY ELL NEWCOMERS CLASS

I know a lot of teachers like to use more typical sentence pattern charts, and I’m sure they work well.

Here are some resources on these more traditional sentence pattern charts:

Teaching English Language Structures Using the Sentence Pattering Chart by Valentina Gonazalez.

Sentence Pattern Chart from Colorin Colorado.

Sentence Patterning Chart from Mulilingual Learning Toolkit.

Sentence Patterns is from the University of North Carolina.

Using Sentence Tiles to Enhance Students’ Writing is from Secondary English Learners.

Let me know of other ideas, please!