Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

December 4, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2016

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It’s still early, and only a few education “year-in-reviews” have come out, but I figured I’d publish an initial list and just continue to add to it.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2015

The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2014

I’m adding this year’s list to All My 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place.

Here’s a beginning list. As I mentioned, there will be many more here before the year is out. let me know what I’m missing:

The Washington Post published my annual The good — and very, very bad — education news of 2016.

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2016 is from Audrey Watters.

December 4, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The Standing Rock Protests

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We teachers shouldn’t shouldn’t shy away from tackling what some would consider “controversial” issues (The Best Posts & Articles On How To Teach “Controversial” Topics) and that includes the Standing Rock protest.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Sites For International Day Of The World’s Indigenous People

The Best Sites For Learning About Protests In History

The Best Posts & Articles On Building Influence & Creating Change

Here is what I have so far – feel free to suggest additional resources:

Battle Over an Oil Pipeline: Teaching About the Standing Rock Sioux Protests is from The New York Times Learning Network. It’s clearly the number one place to go.

7 history lessons that help explain tribal N.D. pipeline protests is from a Portland TV station.

North Dakota Pipeline Protest – Indigenous Nations Unite is a good lesson plan.

Helping Students Connect With Standing Rock is from Teaching Tolerance.

Thanksgiving at Standing Rock are amazing photos from GQ.

Water Cannons and Tear Gas Used Against Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters is a photo gallery from The Atlantic.

‘This pipeline represents something deeper’: Voices from Standing Rock is from The Washington Post.

Gallery: Portraits from the Standing Rock protests is from TED Talks.

As police crack down on Standing Rock protesters, maybe read some books by indigenous authors is from Vox.

Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters, Ordered to Leave, Dig In is from The NY Times.

Fake Cowboys and Real Indians is from The NY Times.

The Conflicts Along 1,172 Miles of the Dakota Access Pipeline is a NY Times interactive.

December 4, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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2016’s Most Popular Posts!

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Based on 1.8 million visits, here are most popular posts from this blog during this year (I’ve completely revised and updated many of them):

1.The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom

2. The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

3. The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL

4. The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures

5. The Best Sites For Teaching About Latitude & Longitude

6. The Best Online Virtual “Corkboards” (or “Bulletin Boards”)

7. Answers To “What Do You Do On The First Day Of School?”

8. The Best Places To Get The “Same” Text Written For Different “Levels”

9. My Entire Best List Series

10. The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”

11.  The Best Movie Scenes To Use For English-Language Development

12. The Best Sites For Grammar Practice

13. The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More

14. The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2015 – So Far

15. The “Best” TED Talks (Well, Really, The Ones I Use With My Classes)

16. The Best Beginner, Intermediate & Advanced English Language Learner Sites

17. The Best Sites To Learn About The 2016 U.S. Presidential Elections

18. The Best Sites Where Students Can Work Independently & Let Teachers Check On Progress

19.The Best Music Websites For Learning English

20. The Best Online Activities For Learning About Time Zones

December 4, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Year In Review Features — 2016

2016

 

I’ve usually done two different types of “year in review” annual posts — one focusing on photo collections and the other on non-photo galleries.

Three years ago, though, I decided to just do one list combining both.

Usually, these “year-in-review” features are published online after schools have begun their winter breaks.  I’m publishing this year’s list early with the few that are available so that teachers can use them, and will add new ones as they come online.

I’ll add this post to All My 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place

You might be interested in these previous posts:

The Best Year In Review Features – 2015

The Best Year In Review Features — 2014

The Best Year In Review Features — 2013

NON-PHOTO COLLECTIONS:

The Best “Year In Review” Features That Aren’t Photo Collections — 2012

The Best “Year In Review” Features That Aren’t Photo Collections — 2010

The Best “Year In Review” Features That Aren’t Photo Collections — 2009

PHOTO COLLECTIONS:

The Best Year-End Collections Of Images — 2012

The Best Year-End Collections Of Images — 2011

The Best Year-End Collections Of Images — 2010

The Best Year-End Collections Of Images — 2009

The Best Year-End Collections Of Images — 2008

You might also be interested in my other 1,600 “The Best…” lists.

Here are my choices for The Best Year In Review Features — 2016:

The Top 10 Everything of 2016 is from TIME.

Year in review: Top stories of 2016 is from The Chicago Tribune.

The Washington Post published my annual The good — and very, very bad — education news of 2016, but I usually create a separate “Best” list for education-related “round-ups.”

The Top Political Tweets and Hashtags of 2016 is from The New York Times.

Top 25 News Photos of 2016 is from The Atlantic.

2016: The Year in Photos, January-April is from The Atlantic.

December 3, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources On Supporting Long-Term English Language Learners

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I was recently asked about resources on Long-Term English Language Learners (LTELs) – students who have been ELLs for six years or longer – and thought readers would find a “Best” list useful. Feel free to suggest links I’ve missed:

Helping Long-Term ELL’s is from my Ed Week column.

Long-term English learner students: Spotlight on an overlooked population is from REL West. Thanks to Dr. Rosa Perez-Isiah for the tip.

State Reports Data on Long Term English Learners and Students at Risk of Becoming Long Term English Learners is from Californian’s Together.

The Difficult Road for Long-Term English Learners is from ASCD.

Meeting The Unique Needs Of Long-Term English Language Learners is from NEA.

Changing Course For Long Term English Language Learners is by Laurie Olsen.

Here’s a PowerPoint presentation on the topic.

December 1, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Scaffolded Writing Frames For Students

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I’ve written a lot about the value of scaffolded writing frames for students – English Language Learners and those who are proficient in English – to use when they are responding to prompts. As my colleague Lara Hoekstra says, “As long as we’re clear that these are some ways to write, not THE ways to write, they can be helpful.”

Some of the teachers at our school met today, and shared the different writing frames we use. They’ve given me permission to share them here, and I’m also including links to previous posts where I’ve shared different related ideas (you can lot of other resources at The Best Posts On Writing Instruction). Please share your own in the comments section:

“Point, Quote, Connect”

Helping Students Respond To Writing Prompts

“They Say, I Say” Is A Great Writing Resource

Exploratree

Here Are Some Examples Of Using “Concept Attainment” In Writing Instruction

“RACE” Looks Like A Useful Writing Strategy

The Text-Evidence Strategy That Changed My Classroom is from Scholastic and is also about RACE.

I’ve previously shared an example of how I scaffolded an ABC writing prompt (Answer the question, Back it up with a quotation, make a Comment & Connection). Based on the conversation we had today, I made some minor, but important changes. I have a picture of the revised version here, and you can download both the old and new versions here (the new version is the second one in the file).

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This next one is from my talented colleague Nichole Scrivner – the well-known PEE frame is simple and effective:

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Here’s a short excerpt from “They Say, I Say” (see a link earlier in this post) that Lara Hoekstra gives to students so they can use it as the “Back it Up With A Quotation” part of the ABC writing frame (or as the “Q” in the “PQC” – Make a Point, use a Quotation to back it up, and make a Comment):

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Nicole Simsonsen shared a strategy called T-BEAR:

T- Topic Sentence

B- Brief Explanation/Bridge to Examples

E- Examples\Evidence

A- Analysis

R- Recall/Reflect/Relate

You can find lots of examples and graphic organizers illustrating T-BEAR online. Here’s an image of one she uses:

tbear

You can download the next three examples here.

Jen Adkins shared her own version of an ABC response:

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Jen also adapted an excellent strategy from our colleague Chris Coey to help students develop an “analytical paragraph.” Also note the strategic way they have students highlight different parts of their paragraph to help them self-analyze if they are placing a higher priority on the “commentary and context”:

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Mary Osteen shared a sheet her students use to provide peer feedback. However, she gives it to them as they are writing, so it functions as a writing frame scaffold, too:

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As you can see, I’m pretty luck to be able to work with such talented and generous educators!

November 27, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Resources On Class Instruction In 2016 – Part Two

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This particular “Best” list is a newer  one.

I have regularly published The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers lists, and will continue to do so.

However, two years ago I began publishing a regular Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week post. I thought, because of that new feature, it made sense to just publish a list highlighting the best from that series, in addition to the regular “Practical Advice” one. That latter list will include many other resources.

The Best Resources On Class Instruction – 2015 was the first edition of this new series, and The Best Resources On Class Instruction In 2016 – So Far was the second.

I’ll be adding this post to All My 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place.

Here are my choices for The Best Resources On Class Instruction In 2016 – Part Two:

Teaching Students to Push Beyond the Single Story Often Told is from the blog “Crawling Out Of The Classroom.” You might also be interested in some of my past posts on the same topic: “the danger of not having your own stories” and Useful TED-Ed Lesson On “The Danger of a Single Story.”

Student Self Assessment and Self-Regulation – A Cornerstone of Successful Formative Assessment is from Teach Learn Grown. Coincidentally, I published a post at the British Council on the same topic this week – Strategies for self assessment. I’m adding both to The Best Resources For Learning About Formative Assessment.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Good Homework Policy is from Middleweb. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Homework Issues.

Independent Reading: A Research Based Defense is from Russ on Reading, and provides a lot of “ammunition” for those of us who advocate for students reading books of their choice. It’s an excellent response to what I would characterize as a recent misguided critique of the practice by Tim Shanahan, who I think is usually on target (I’ve written positively about much of his work).  I’m adding it to The Best Resources Documenting The Effectiveness of Free Voluntary Reading.

Do Teachers Remain Neutral or Share their Beliefs with Students? is by Rick Wormeli. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On How To Teach “Controversial” Topics.

How Can Educators Design Authentic Performance Tasks? (Part 3) is by Jay McTighe. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Performance Assessment.

20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching is from Teach Thought. I’m adding it to The “Best” Lists Of Recommendations About What “Effective” Teachers Do.

Top 10 Evidence Based Teaching Strategies is from the Australian Society for Evidence Based Teaching (formerly Pinnacle). I’m adding it to the same list.

Bringing “Sophistication” to Vocabulary Instruction is by Russ Walsh. I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where ELL’s Can Learn Vocabulary (there are many vocabulary-building strategies there for ELL and non-ELL students alike).

This is an older piece, but I shared it recently: But That’s Just Good Teaching! The Case for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy is by Gloria Ladson-Billings. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About “Culturally Responsive Teaching” & “Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy” – Please Share More!

8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning is from Teach Thought. I’m adding it to The Best Questions To Use For Class Closing Activities — What Are Yours?

Talking Across Divides: 10 Ways to Encourage Civil Classroom Conversation On Difficult Issues is from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On How To Teach “Controversial” Topics.

Eight Ways to Help Kids to Read Complex Text is by Timothy Shanahan. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “Close Reading” — Help Me Find More.

Read Write Think has lots of great interactives. I recently learned, though, that they also have PDF versions of many of them. I’m adding the link to The Best & Most Useful Free Student Hand-Outs Available Online – Help Me Find More.

The photo in this tweet (the second tweet gives credit to the creator) is an improvement on what I have used for years – “I’m Not Sure, But I Think That…”:

November 26, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2016 – Part Two

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It’s time for another of my end-of-year “Best” lists (you can see all 1,600 “The Best…” lists here).

I’m adding this one to All My 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2015 – So Far

The Best Articles, Posts & Videos On Education Policy In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2014 – So Far

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2013 — Part Two

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) On Education Policy In One Place

All My 2012 “The Best…” Lists On Education Policy In One Place

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Polcy In 2011 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy — 2010

The “Best” Articles (And Blog Posts) About Education Policy — 2009

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2008

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2016 – Part Two (let me know what you think I’m missing – this post is different from my annual “round-up” of the biggest education-related news stories I write for The Washington Post every year) – these are not listed in any order of preference (I’m starting off with links to “Best” lists I’ve posted over the past few months that relate to ed policy):

The Best Resources For Learning About Our New U.S. Secretary of Education

The Best Articles On What The Trump Presidency Might Mean For Schools

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2016

The Best Articles For Learning About Laurene Powell Jobs’ Project To Redesign High Schools

The Best Posts On The Value Of Ethnic Studies Classes – Help Me Find More

The Best Glossaries Of Education Terminology

The Washington Post published a column I wrote about what school was like the day after the Presidential election, ‘Dear President-elect Trump’: Immigrant students write letters asking for ‘the opportunity to demonstrate we are good people.’ There was a reaction to the similar stories many other teachers shared – read No, Most Educators Are Not “Fueling Student Anxieties” – Trump Is Handling That On His Own.

Why the History of School Reform is Essential for Policymakers, Practitioners, and Researchers is by Larry Cuban. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Providing An “Overall” Perspective On Education Policy.

Rethinking School Discipline is from The American Prospect. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Restorative Practices – Help Me Find More.

Five myths about charter schools is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

There is ‘Hope That ESSA Will Bring Positive Change To Classrooms’ is the headline of one of  my latest Education Week Teacher columns. In it, Randi Weingarten, Barnett Berry, Morgan Polikoff, Erik M. Francis, and Jacki Gran wrote how they believe The Every Student Succeeds Act will affect classroom practice.

From Deficiency to Strength: Shifting the Mindset about Education Inequality is by Yong Zhao. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Looking At Our Students Through The Lens Of Assets & Not Deficits.

I wouldn’t necessarily say this is one of the “best” pieces on Ed Policy, but I think readers will find the entire post very interesting: A Report On EdSource Symposium On California Ed, Including What I Said About State Assessments.

The Bush Institute released an interactive on education so you can compare schools in 114 cities. The State of our Cities project appears surprisingly interesting and objective. It does not appear – at least to me – that they have any ax to grind in the school reform debate, and list useful stats. You can read more about it at Ed Week’s article, New Website to Compare Cities’ Education Results Makes Debut. I’m adding this info to The Best Places To Get Reliable, Valid, Accessible & Useful Education Data.

An open letter to editors of the New York Times (and most other American periodicals). is by Daniel Willingham.

Why firing bad teachers isn’t nearly as important as creating good ones is from The L.A. Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On California Court Case Attacking Teacher’s Rights.

Education Matters, But Direct Anti-Poverty and Inequality-Reduction Efforts Matter More is by Ben Spielberg. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Why Improving Education Is Not THE Answer To Poverty & Inequality.

Reforms That Stick: How Schools Change is by Larry Cuban.

Five Thirty Eight published a piece worth reading headlined The Economic Recovery Hasn’t Reached America’s Schools.

The Education Commission of the States has put out what may be the most accessible, and short, guide to The Every Student Succeeds Act. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Understanding The Every Student Succeeds Act.

Foundations Unfiltered is a behind-the-scenes peek at education foundations. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

Anthony Byrk coins a new -at least, to me – term, “practice-based evidence,” in his piece, Accelerating How We Learn to Improve. Here’s how he describes it:

The choice of words practice-based evidence is deliberate. We aim to signal a key difference in the relationship between inquiry and improvement as compared to that typically assumed in the more commonly used expression evidence-based practice. Implicit in the latter is that evidence of efficacy exists somewhere outside of local practice and practitioners should simply implement these evidence-based practices. Improvement research, in contrast, is an ongoing, local learning activity.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research.

America’s Not-So-Broken Education System is by Jack Schneider. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Pointing Out That Our Schools Are Not Failing — Please Suggest More.

Teacher Unions Are ‘Bargaining for the Common Good’ is from The American Prospect. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Why Teachers Unions Are Important.

John Oliver did this great segment, with classroom appropriate language (except for one “sh_tty”), on charter schools:

He did this one on school segregation. It’s good, though I put it on this blog reluctantly because of some classroom inappropriate language:

What do you think I’m missing?

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