Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

December 9, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Collection Of My Best Resources On Classroom Management

 

Over the past week, I’ve published three posts bringing together many of the materials I’ve either developed or collected on topics I’ve written books about:

A Collection Of My Best Resources On Parent Engagement

A Collection Of My Best Resources On Student Motivation

A Collection Of My Best Resources On Teaching English Language Learners

And, though there is certainly a lot of overlap between “Student Motivation” and “Classroom Management,” since I did put together a book specifically on that topic, I thought one last collection would be useful:

Classroom Management Q&As: Expert Strategies for Teaching is the title of that book. Going to the link will lead you to a number of free and useful resources.

Five key strategies to get/keep kids engaged at school is a book excerpt that appeared in The Washington Post.

Here are some of the best articles I’ve written on the topic that have appeared in various publications:

Q & A Collections: Classroom Management Advice is the headline of one of my Education Week Teacher columns. It contains links to all the columns on classroom management from the past six years!

Here are All My BAM! Radio Shows About Classroom Management

Ten-Minute Podcast: Vicki Davis Interviews Me About Classroom Management

One of my most popular “Best” lists is The Best Posts On Classroom Management.  It includes links to even more pieces I’ve written (including other related “Best” lists) about the subject, along with lots of good resources from others.

December 9, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Resources To Help Students Find College Scholarships

 

Here are new additions to The Best Resource Sites For Scholarship Information:

Looking for college scholarships? Here’s some advice for Latino students is from NBC News.

Scholly is a relatively new tool to help students find scholarships.

Career One Stop is from The Department of Labor.

December 9, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Ideas For Helping Students Connect Lessons To Their Interests & The World

Relevance is a key component of developing intrinsic motivation (see my Edutopia post, Strategies for Helping Students Motivate Themselves).

Assisting students to see how they can apply what they learning to new situations – both inside and outside of school – can be one way to cultivate that sense of relevance. This idea is called “transfer of knowledge,” and you can read more, as well as watch a short video I did with Ed Week on the topic, at The Best Resources For Learning About The Concept Of “Transfer” — Help Me Find More.

There are also other ways to help students see lessons as relevant to their interests and to their lives.

I’ve previously shared posts with practical ideas about what teachers can do to assist towards this goal. In addition, in the last twenty-four hours, two groups whom I respect have released new lessons on this very subject. So, I figured it was time to bring them all together.

Let me know what resources I might be missing.

I’m adding this list to Best Posts On “Motivating” Students.

Here is what I have so far:

These first two links are posts where I shared lessons (and research) I used in my own classes:

“Relevance” & Student Learning

How Do You Think Working Hard & Learning Everything You Can In This Class Might Help You Now & In The Future?

I wrote this post yesterday about related resources from The New York Times Learning Network: I Like This NY Times Learning Network Student “Challenge” To Make Connections

Today, Character Lab released Build Connections, a pretty detailed and practical activity, including hand-outs, on this topic.

Here’s a video describing it:

Build Connections from Character Lab on Vimeo.

Let me know what I’m missing!

December 8, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Social Emotional Learning Resources Of 2017

I publish a regular series called SEL Weekly Update, and I thought it would useful to readers and to me to review them and highlight the ones I think are the best of the year.

You might also be interested in The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources.

I’ll be adding this list to All 2017 “Best” Lists – In One Place!

You might also be interested in A Collection Of My Best Resources On Student Motivation and My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2017 – Part Two.

Here are my choices:

Q & A Collections: Student Motivation & Social Emotional Learning is the headline of one of my Education Week Teacher columns.It brings together links to all the columns on Student Motivation & Social Emotional Learning from the past six years!

New Study Suggests That Motivation & Growth Mindset Are Most Important Factors For Student Success

Yet Another Study Documents The Long-Term Harm Of Short-Term Extrinsic Motivation

Extrinsic Motivation Strikes Out Again

New Study Finds Students Less Motivated In School The More They Think Wealth & Income Inequality Is Stacked Against Them

Using The “Curiosity Gap” To Enhance Student Motivation

Intriguing Research On How To Increase Intrinsic Motivation

Here’s A Great Motivating Question For Students To Consider…

A Look Back: Video – “10 Strategies to Help Students Develop Intrinsic Motivation to Write”

All Teachers Could Benefit From Watching New PBS NewsHour Segment On Motivation

Michelle Obama Just Explained How to Be Successful in 6 Short Words is from Inc (“Focus on what you can control.”). I’m adding it to Best Posts On Students Setting Goals.

The Importance of Academic Courage is by Ron Berger. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit”

Forget The 10,000-Hour Rule; Edison, Bezos, & Zuckerberg Follow The 10,000-Experiment Rule appeared in Medium. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice.

This Is The ‘Harry Potter’ Synopsis Publishers Rejected Over 20 Years Ago is from The Huff Post. I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures.

Using SEL to Challenge ‘Systems of Oppression’ is the headline of one of my latest Education Week Teacher columns.

Three Specific Actions I’m Taking This Year To Support Student Academic & SEL Development

Sesame Street launches tools to help children who experience trauma, from hurricanes to violence at home is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Ways For Responding To Student Trauma – Help Me Find More.

Infants Can Learn the Value of Perseverance by Watching Adults is from The Atlantic, and it seems to me it’s a reasonable extrapolation that our students can learn the same when we make mistakes and model learning from them. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit”

The Best Resources On Developing A Sense Of Community In The Classroom

The Best Ways To Talk With Someone Who Disagrees With You

The Best Resources For Learning About “Nudges” In Schools

The Best Resources On Social Capital In Schools

All My BAM! Radio Shows About Social Emotional Learning

The Best Resources On Helping Students Make Good Decisions

How children’s self-control has changed in the past 50 years is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control.

Quiz Yourself: How Much Do You Know About Social-Emotional Learning is from Ed Week.

A new study finds that students who experienced Social Emotional skills training were more likely to vote than others. Read about it in Researchers Accidentally Found One Way to Help Kids Grow Up to Be Voters.

A different new study found other positive results:

Comparing students who participated in SEL programs to those who didn’t, the results showed significant benefits that persisted from one to nearly four years afterward.

How Ending Behavior Rewards Helped One School Focus on Student Motivation and Character is from MindShift. I’m adding it to  Best Posts On “Motivating” Students.

This is a list of excellent suggestions on how to promote metacognition in students. I’m adding it to Best Posts On Metacognition.

How to Work with a Bad Listener is from The Harvard Business Review. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas To Help Students Become Better Listeners — Contribute More.

Building a Modern Marshmallow Test: New Ways to Measure Social-Emotional Learning is from Ed Week.

Social and Emotional Learning for English Learners is from New America.

CARRY ON MY SON: THE SIGNAL AND THE NOISE IN COACHING is a post from Doug Lemov. It’s definitely worth reading his commentary on this great video clip. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Use Stephen Curry & The Warriors For Teaching Social Emotional Learning Skills.

Study’s Conclusion Is Not As Useless As It Sounds: Low-Income Adolescents Are Less Likely To Attend College

Understanding these three principles will help you develop true intrinsic motivation is from Quartz and is an interview with pioneer researchers in the field. I’m adding it to Best Posts On “Motivating” Students.

How the Golden State Warriors Can Help Explain Social-Emotional Learning is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Use Stephen Curry & The Warriors For Teaching Social Emotional Learning Skills.

No, No, No! Do Not Grade SEL Skills!

Forget Grit. Focus on Inequality. appeared in Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About “Grit.”

10 Incredible Lessons We Learned From Michael Phelps on Grit and Perseverance is a very accessible article that could easily be used with students, along with a simple writing prompt. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit”

When an Argument Gets Too Heated, Here’s What to Say is from The Harvard Business Review.

UNVEILING THE MYSTERY OF METACOGNITION is from Research Schools Network. I’m adding it to Best Posts On Metacognition.

New Research Suggests That “Community Trust” Enhances Self-Control & Long-Term Thinking

Encouraging Social and Emotional Learning In the Context of New Accountability is a new report from The Learning Policy Institute. I’m adding it to The Best Summaries/Reviews Of Research On Social Emotional Learning – Let Me Know What I’ve Missed and to The Best Resources For Understanding The Every Student Succeeds Act.

Four Teaching Moves That Promote A Growth Mindset In All Readers is from MindShift. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

New Report Connecting SEL To Standards Should Be On “Must-Read” List For Most Educators

 

I’m adding this new video from Jo Boaler to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”:

A Look Back: “Here’s A Narrated Version Of My Slide Deck On SEL & The Common Core”

Seven Facts on Noncognitive Skills from Education to the Labor Market looks very interesting. It’s from The Hamilton Project. I’m adding it to The Best Info On Skills Employers Are Looking For In Job-Seekers.

When Practice Does Make Perfect is by Dan Willingham. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice.

Here’s a brand-new short video of Daniel Pink discussing motivation in the context of schools. It comes from the great Brainwaves video series.

I’m also including a video that Brainwaves did with me where I share some specific strategies teachers can use to promote intrinsic motivation among students.

I’m adding this info to Best Posts On “Motivating” Students.

You might also interested in this Edutopia excerpt from one of my books. It’s been shared 41,000 times: Strategies for Helping Students Motivate Themselves

December 7, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

I Like This NY Times Learning Network Student “Challenge” To Make Connections

“How am I going to use this?”

“Why are we learning about something that happened three hundred years ago??

“Why are we doing this?”

We’ve all heard some variation of these comments from students at one time or another.

I’ve written and shared about some potential responses at The Best Resources For Learning About The Concept Of “Transfer” — Help Me Find More.

Now, The New York Times Learning Network has announced an intriguing “challenge” to students: Connect What You’re Studying in School With the World Today.

They’re challenging students to connect something they’re learning in school to something to something that has been published in The NY Times over the past year.

And they also offer some helpful suggestions.

It’s actually a useful activity for any teacher to have students do, and I suspect many have/are doing just that (if not, it seems like it might be worth trying) – connecting a lesson to any kind of media posting about a current event.

Of course, having it connected to a NY Times contest and potential widespread recognition could make it more tempting to students, whether you’ve done an activity like this in the past or not….

December 5, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Here’s My Tentative Plan For A Support Class For Long-Term English Language Learners – Tell Me How I Can Make It Better

I may – or may not – be teaching one class period of support for Long-Term English Language Learners (who will be in ninth-grade) next year. It would be a pilot class and, depending on a number of factors, could be expanded in future years.

Here’s my tentative plan for it (I’m sharing portions of working draft that is being circulated at our school now).  I’m also including some related links. Let me know what you think and how I can improve it.

The idea is that they would be in a “cohort” and be together in their English class and possibly other content courses, as well.

I’ll be adding this post to The Best Resources On Supporting Long-Term English Language Learners:

 

Content Of The Class:

* Many of these LTELLs may have not “shined” in previous classes because of their language challenges.  One way to begin to change that perception is for Larry to become familiar with the curriculum and sequence of the Science classes (he already knows the Geography and  English curriculum since he’s taught it in the past or is teaching it now) and emphasize engaging texts and writing activities designed to help students develop more prior knowledge about the topics being covered in those other classes.   Prior knowledge is a key to academic success, and this could create opportunities for them to “shine” in those content classes as knowing more than their peers in some situations – perhaps for the first time in the academic careers.  Of course, this prior knowledge will also facilitate their comprehension of lessons being taught in the content classes.

* Coordinating the reading of those texts with writing instruction focusing on sentences and paragraphs – less so on longer writing,which will be taking place in their content classes.

* Explicit teaching of academic vocabulary – both in writing and in verbal discussion.

* Using a number of Larry’s lessons and activities designed to help promote student intrinsic motivation, both focused on becoming fluent in a new language and for academic learning in general.

 

Evaluation:

A control group of a roughly similar demographic group (and number) of LTELLs not in the support class would be chosen.   To make the comparative process not too time-consuming,  it would be ideal if the control group could be composed of students from two-or-three other classes.  The evaluation instruments would include:

* CELDT tests (really, the new state language tests) comparison from students’ eighth grade to the results from the tests given at Burbank in the spring of the school year they would be in the support class.

* The regular schoolwide writing assessments comparing the fall and spring essays.

* Both the LTEEL support class and the control group would take a series of online assessments lasting one or two class periods  assessing reading comprehension, vocabulary development and listening comprehension.

 

What do you think?

December 4, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Reports On The New “Lost Einsteins” Study

Stanford economist Raj Chetty has led a team of researchers that just released a huge new study on innovation in the United States. And it found something that most urban teachers know – there are millions of low-income children who could be brilliant innovators if they had the same resources as middle and wealthy students:

there could be millions of “lost Einsteins”—individuals who might have become inventors and changed the course of American life, had they grown up in different neighborhoods. “There are very large gaps in innovation by income, race, and gender,” Chetty told me. “These gaps don’t seem to be about differences in ability to innovate—they seem directly related to environment.”

Chetty’s research outside of schools is brilliant. Two years ago, he released a related study on the role of geography in economic success (see What Are The School Implications Of New Chetty Study On Geographical Mobility?).

When it comes to school-related research, however, he clearly has a blindspot, as do many economists (see The Best Posts & Articles About The Role Of Economists In Education).  I am always a bit amused when tenured university faculty question how much years of experience should factor in a K-12 teacher’s pay, as he did earlier this year.  Or the time a few years ago when he compared teachers to baseball players and that you need to  let some of the players with lower batting averages go.”

But this new study doesn’t seem to go there. Along with “ammunition” for political arguments against wealth inequality (see The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality ), it reinforces the value of teachers looking at our students through the lens of assets and not deficits (see The Best Posts On Looking At Our Students Through The Lens Of Assets & Not Deficits).

Here are the best pieces on the research that I’ve seen so far:

Lost Einsteins: The Innovations We’re Missing appeared in The New York Times.

America’s Lost Einsteins is from The Atlantic.

Groundbreaking empirical research shows where innovation really comes from is from Vox.

Can Schools Help Uncover ‘Lost Einsteins’ in a New Generation of Inventors? is from Ed Week.

December 3, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Collection Of My Best Resources On Parent Engagement

 

Two days ago, I published A Collection Of My Best Resources On Teaching English Language Learners, which brought together many of the materials on that topic that I have either written or collected.

And, since I also have a very large amount of materials on student motivation, I published A Collection Of My Best Resources On Student Motivation.

And, since I’ve also written a book about parent engagement and have shared many related resources, here’s the last in this series of “Best” posts.

Building Parent Engagement In Schools is the title of the book I co-authored.  You can find some free resources at the link.

Here are some of the best articles I’ve written on the topic that have appeared in Ed Week, ASCD Educational Leadership and The Washington Post.  You can find links to even more here.:

I’ve published quite a few posts at my Education Week Teacher column on Parent Engagement In Schools.

There are about fifty “Best” lists specifically related to parent engagement here.

I host a blog, Engaging Parents In School, where I share new resources two or three times each month.

I was interviewed by Val Brown on parent engagement.

It was part of the Center for Teaching Quality “microcredential series.”

If you find it useful or interesting, you can read and/or listen to other commentaries I’ve done on the topic.

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