Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

September 24, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: President Obama At The Opening Of The Smithsonian’s African-American Museum (Plus Teaching Ideas)

President Obama spoke today at opening of The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture. You can read more about it at this Washington Post article, African American Museum opening: ‘This place is more than a building. It is a dream come true.’

I’ve embedded the video of his speech (he begins at the nine minute mark) at the bottom of this post. Here’s the transcript.

He talks a lot at the beginning about the importance of story-telling and what he says meshes very well with Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s popular TED Talk, “The Danger Of A Single Story.” Many teachers use it in the classroom now, and I think portions of the President’s speech would be an excellent addition to those lessons.

You can find more info on that idea in two previous posts:

“the danger of not having your own stories”

Useful TED-Ed Lesson On “The Danger of a Single Story”

I’m adding this post to The Best Resources On The Smithsonian’s African-American Museum.

September 24, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Watch The Debates” Is New PBS News Hour Interactive

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Watch The Debates lets you view all the Presidential debates since 1960, including clips categorized by subject. You can then indicate your thoughts about what is being said, and compare your reactions to others.

It’s unclear to me how quickly they will upload this year’s debates. Even if it takes awhile, though, it’s a very useful site for classes.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About The 2016 U.S. Presidential Elections.

September 21, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Resources On The Smithsonian’s African-American Museum

smithsonian

(Earlier this week, I posted about the new Smithsonian African-American Museum. Lot of new resources have come online since that day, so am expanding it into a “Best” list.)

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture has its official opening later this week.

Here are some related resources, including highlights from their website:

How a Museum Captures African American History is from The Atlantic.

The New York Times has an interactive on the museum.

Review: The Smithsonian African American Museum Is Here at Last. And It Uplifts and Upsets. is from The NY Times.

Obama to Ring In Opening of African American Museum is from The NY Times.

The Guardian has a decidedly different “take” on the museum: The Smithsonian’s African American museum – a monument to respectability politics, as does a writer in The Washington Post: The African American Museum tells powerful stories — but not as powerfully as it could.

The website itself is a treasure trove of primary resources – you can examine each object with a little of its background, there’s a section of “stories” about certain objects with much more information about them, and a particularly impressive collection of video interviews with people about their experience in the Civil Rights Movement, along with written transcripts of those conversations.

However, it was disappointing to see no suggestions, tools, or guides for using these treasures with students, so you might want to explore The Best Resources For Using Primary Sources.

The top 36 must-see items at the African American museum is from The Washington Post.

Timeline: It took over 100 years for the African American Museum to become a reality is from The Washington Post.

Tour through the National Museum of African American History and Culture is a Washington Post interactive.

Video: President Obama At The Opening Of The Smithsonian’s African-American Museum (Plus Teaching Ideas)

You might also be interested in All My “Best” Lists On Race, Racism & The Civil Rights Movement – In One Place.

September 20, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Here Are Downloadable Scaffolded Instructions For Students To Create A “3/2/1” Poster

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I’ve written several previous posts about how I use variations of a 3/2/1 strategy that I first learned about from educator Ekuwah Moses (see The Best Ways To Use “3-2-1” As An Instructional Strategy).

I mainly use it in my English Language Learner history classes, but it’s adaptable to just about any course.

I have students write what they think are the most important concepts or facts they learned about in a chapter and why they think they are important; two phrases and why they think they are important; a sentence and why they think it is important; and draw an image. Then, of course, they share their poster with the class in various ways.

Here is the scaffolded instruction sheet students use. Let me know how I can make it better!

September 19, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Sept. 26th Is “International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons” – Here Are Related Resources

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The United Nations has declared September 26th to be International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons.

You might find these resources useful:

The Best Resources For Learning About The Atomic Bombings Of Japan

The Best Sites For Learning About Nuclear Weapons

September 18, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Smithsonian’s African-American Museum Opens This Week – Here Are Related Resources

smithsonian

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture has its official opening later this week.

Here are some related resources, including highlights from their website:

How a Museum Captures African American History is from The Atlantic.

The New York Times has an interactive on the museum.

Review: The Smithsonian African American Museum Is Here at Last. And It Uplifts and Upsets. is from The NY Times.

Obama to Ring In Opening of African American Museum is from The NY Times.

The Guardian has a decidedly different “take” on the museum: The Smithsonian’s African American museum – a monument to respectability politics, as does a writer in The Washington Post: The African American Museum tells powerful stories — but not as powerfully as it could.

The website itself is a treasure trove of primary resources – you can examine each object with a little of its background, there’s a section of “stories” about certain objects with much more information about them, and a particularly impressive collection of video interviews with people about their experience in the Civil Rights Movement, along with written transcripts of those conversations.

However, it was disappointing to see no suggestions, tools, or guides for using these treasures with students, so you might want to explore The Best Resources For Using Primary Sources.

You might also be interested in All My “Best” Lists On Race, Racism & The Civil Rights Movement – In One Place.

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