Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

February 4, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Videos On Milgram & Stanford Prison Experiments – Not Blocked By YouTube Safety Mode

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I’m beginning to teach about the Milgram and Stanford Prison Experiments in my IB Theory of Knowledge classes.

I’ve always has a rich collection of related resources at our class blog, but many of the videos are blocked by YouTube’s Safety Mode (see The Best Ways To Deal With YouTube’s Awful Safety Mode) and, before I took the time to download the videos and upload them again to the blog, I decided take a few minutes to see if there were some equally good ones that were not blocked.

Here’s what I found:

The Milgram Experiment from Johannes Jørgensen on Vimeo.

Disclose TV Video on Milgram experiment

Stanford Prison Experiment Overview (13 min) from Ryan Beck on Vimeo.

Stanford Prison Experiment-Zimbardo from Sansa Morse on Vimeo.

Stanford Prison Experiment Video

January 24, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New ELL History “What If?” Projects

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I’ve often blogged about our What If? History projects (see The Best Resources For Teaching “What If?” History Lessons).

As I do every year, my IB Theory of Knowledge students first create ones, and then I make arrangements for them to come to my English Language Learner history classes for one or two periods to help them create their own.

Here’s the research planning form my students use, and here’s the outline they use for their PowerPoint presentations.

Here are a few simple presentations my ELL students created:

What Would Have Happened If The Aztecs Had Killed The Spanish?

What If Columbus Didn’t “Discover” America?

What If Genghis Khan Didn’t Unite The Mongols?

What if Muhammad Did Not Experience A Revelation?

You can see many other examples of presentations created by both my ELL and TOK students at the previously-mentioned “Best” list…

January 17, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Four Intriguing Perspectives On History

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Over the past two months, I’ve seen a few tweets that have provided an interesting perspective on history. I thought it would be useful to collect them in one place and perhaps use them in my Theory of Knowledge or Social Studies classes (the first one refers to the second):

This next one was in response to the last tweet:

January 17, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Here’s A Nice Lesson I Did On Ethics In My Theory Of Knowledge Class

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This past week, I did a lesson on ethics that I do every year with my IB Theory of Knowledge students. It went very well, and I thought readers might find it useful to hear what I did.

I borrowed and modified it from the IB Theory of Knowledge Course Book. Though we don’t use that textbook with students, I use some of the ideas in it for lessons.

I introduced students to the idea that there five primary sources from where we derive our personal morality:

1. Human Nature
2. Religion
3. Observation & Reason
4. Emotional Empathy
5. Social & Political

I actually had not heard of this list prior to reading the textbook but, after looking it up, it appears to be relatively common (though I can’t find an original source and would love it if readers could identify one).

I then divide students into five groups and assign one of the sources of morality to each one. They have a class period-and-a-half to work together and research online their “source” and each prepare a poster and two-to-three minutes presentation on it. How they research is up to them – they can divide up parts of it and work on their own. Most divided up parts. The one-page listing in the textbook provides examples for each of the five, and those are very helpful (for example, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs for human nature and the UN Declaration of Human Rights for social and political). If you do this lesson, I’d suggest you either get the book or identify your own examples for students to use (you can find additional info online that might be useful here, here, and here).

After spending one period researching the info in the library, students had twenty minutes to meet in their groups and create a poster – each student in their group had to create their own, but it was okay if they all looked the same. I gave students in each group a letter, and then the A’s from each group got together, as did the B’s, etc., to meet and present to each other — in other words, it was a “jigsaw.” I told people to listen carefully because the culminating project would be for them to write an explanation using the info they learned saying what they believe are the sources of their own personal morality and why. Oddly, I thought, the textbook has students doing this prior to their investigations.

It all went quite well with a high-level of engagement.

Here are some of the evaluative comments students wrote:

I found it really interesting because I never looked at my morality from all those perspectives. I didn’t realize that there were as many ways to describe and identify our morality.

This morality project helped me understand the people around us and ourselves better.

I learned a little about myself. This enabled me to reflect upon myself and see how I reason with myself.

It was useful because I did not recognize or think about most of these sources.

I really liked learning about the sources of morality because I had never thought about my morals coming from anywhere other than my parents/family.

I liked this activity because it was individual and group work.

Any suggestions on how to improve it and/or where I can find more examples demonstrating each of those five sources of morality — even the textbook doesn’t offer enough of them (in my opinion, at least).

January 14, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week

Each week, I publish a post containing three or four particularly useful resources on classroom instruction, and you can see them all here.

You might also be interested in The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015 – So Far and The Best Resources On Class Instruction – 2015.

Here are this week’s picks:

A Handy Compendium of 2015 TOK posts, downloadable is a series of posts by Eileen and Theo Dombrowski. Eileen is co-author of one of the most popular IB Theory of Knowledge textbooks.

Lesson Plan | Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History is from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Learning & Teaching Geography.

10 Surefire Ideas to Remove Writing Roadblocks is by Regie Routman at Middleweb. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

The science of resilience: how to teach students to persevere is by Judy Willis and appeared in the Guardian.

Differentiating With Learning Menus is very good video from The Teaching Channel. It’s embedded below. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

January 11, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: Excellent Michael Sandel Interview On Ethics

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I’ve previously posted a lot about the work of Harvard professor Michael Sandel.

Here’s an older video clip
of an interview he did on NBC. I use it in my IB Theory of Knowledge class when we’re studying Ethics.

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