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Not The “Best,” But A List… Of Online Video Editors

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We’re just starting to do some video-making in our Intermediate English class, and I’ve been trying to figure out the best way to do some video-editing. For now, this is not a “The Best…” list. Instead, it’s just a “list.”

You might also be interested in:

The Best Ways For Students To Create Online Videos (Using Someone Else’s Content)

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The Best Ways For Students To Create Online Animations

For now, here are my choices for Not The “Best,” But A List…Of Online Video Editors:

Stroome is another online video-editing application. Wesley Fryer has an excellent tutorial with screenshots on using it. They’ve just added a feature called “groups” that lets you work with a….group of people to collaboratively edit a video. Because of that additional feature, I’m adding Stroome to The Best Online Tools For Collaboration — NOT In Real Time. Thanks to 10,000 Words for the tip. Their post also explains other Stroome features.

There are three other sites (that are similar to each other) and are much more limited in their video-editing capabilities, and in the length of the videos that can be uploaded — Animoto, Stupeflix, and Flixtime.

Magisto is a new Animoto-like service that lets you upload several short videos and it then somehow “recognizes” the most important parts and turns it into a magically-produced one minute video. You can read more about it at Go2Web2.0.

CHeck out “YouTube Makes Dramatic Addition To Video Editing Features.”

HOW TO: Get the Most From YouTube Editor is a video from Mashable.

Creaza Movie Editor is another video tool that might be worth looking at. I haven’t tried it yet, though, and would be interested in hearing from anyone who has.

Universal Subtitles is an experimental online application that seems to make it quite easy to add subtitles to any video. Of course, YouTube has introduced an automatic system for creating subtitles, but I haven’t tried that yet. Has anybody else? What do you think?

We Video is a new online video-editing tool. You can read more here. Here’s an update on it from Richard Byrne.

Memplai looks like a good online video editor that can incorporate photos and videos. Thanks to Alan Levine for the tip.

As I mentioned earlier, please share other suggestions and your experiences working with the ones I’ve listed. I’ll revise this list in a month or two after I actually edit videos with them.

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You might also want to explore the 400 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

5 Comments

  1. Hi Larry,
    I’m excited to give JayCut a try in my classroom. I plan to have students using it in late April, I’ll post about it when it happens.
    Thanks as always for the plug.
    Richard

  2. Hi Larry,

    We’d love to have you check out our free photo and video sharing site that also allows you t create videos that we call muvees. Shwup.com is our free online version of our flagship software muvee Reveal. Shwup has been a big hit with teachers for its many features as well as it’s privacy aspects. Check it out and let me know what you think!

    -Lindsay Stevens, PR Manager, muvee

  3. Pingback: School 2.0 Bookmarks (weekly) | School 2.0 in SA

  4. Pingback: Thoughts about adding videos to blogs and wikis | Bonding through blogging

  5. Pingback: Not The “Best,” But A List… Of Online Video Editors | Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day... | Innovative Instructional Design | Scoop.it

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