A big new study was released today examining the role of teacher expectations on student educational achievement.

It’s titled Teacher Expectations Matter, and was authored by Nicholas W. Papageorge, Seth Gershenson and Kyung Min Kang.

Unfortunately, it’s behind a paywall. I was able to read the entire study, though, and thought this was a key paragraph:

In summary, our findings show that expectations matter and that systematic differences in expectations put black students at a disadvantage. Shifting the production of expectations so that black students faced the same expectations (i.e., the same “benefit of the doubt” as white students with similar θi) would help to close achievement gaps. The next question is how to narrow expectations gaps across groups. One possibility is to hire more black teachers since they are more likely to have higher expectations for black students than are white teachers, but doing so is not a costless endeavor and may not be feasible, especially in the short run. A second possibility is rooted in the idea that racial expectations differences tend to be relatively small and subtle. Teachers may therefore be unaware of their own biases, a phenomenon known as implicit bias. Emerging scholarship provides mounting evidence that relatively low-cost interventions (e.g., simply informing teachers of their biases) can reduce implicit biases and change teacher behaviors in ways that help traditionally under-served or disadvantaged students (Okonofua et al., 2016; Alesina et al., 2018).

I’ve previously posted about this issue in the past, and thought I’d bring all of those resources together into one “Best” list.

Here are links to those posts:

I THINK THIS NEW NPR VIDEO IS A ‘MUST-WATCH’ FOR EVERY TEACHER: “THE POWER OF EXPECTATIONS”

NEW STUDY FINDS THAT PD, COLLABORATION, SAFETY, EXPECTATIONS IMPORTANT FOR SCHOOLS – WHAT A SURPRISE!

VIDEO: TEACHER EXPECTATIONS & RACE

DEPRESSING STATISTIC OF THE DAY: MANY WHITE TEACHERS HAVE LOW EXPECTATIONS OF BLACK STUDENTS