Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

November 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources For Teaching Common Core Math To English Language Learners

I’m hearing that many math teachers, at least in the secondary level, are finding it very challenging to teach Common Core math to English Language Learners.

I thought I’d start bringing together some potentially useful resources, and hope readers will contribute more.

In addition, I’d love to interview teachers who are having success teaching Common Core math to ELLs, so please leave a comment if you’d be open to talking with me. Please leave a comment if you’re open to talking.

Before I share resources specifically related to Common Core math, here are some math-related “Best” lists I’ve previously posted:

The Best Math Websites For English Language Learners
The Best Science & Math Sites — 2008

The Best Science & Math Sites — 2009
The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

You might also be interested in this article: Is math a universal language or a foreign language for ELLs? from MultiBriefs.

And then there’s The Best Resources For Learning About Common Core Standards & English Language Learners.

Okay, now here are some Common Core-connected math resources:

Common-Core Math Standards Put New Focus on English-Learners is an important article from Education Week.

Diane Staehr Fenner has put together an excellent post, Resources for Teaching the CCSS in Mathematics to ELLs.

Laura Stevens has also compiled a very useful list.

Check out the resources at Understanding Language at Stanford.

Common Core Math for English Language Learners

Again, I hope that readers will contribute more!

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October 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Effective Math Instructional Strategies – Part Two”

Effective Math Instructional Strategies – Part Two is my latest Education Week Teacher post.

Leslie Texas, Tammy Jones and Denise Flick share their thoughts on math instruction, as do a number of readers. It also features an infographic.

Here’s an excerpt:

Remember-that-strategies

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October 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New TED-Ed Video Is For TOK Teachers: “Is math discovered or invented?”

TED-Ed has just published a video and lesson on the topic, Is math discovered or invented?

This question is one most, if not all, IB Theory of Knowledge teachers deal with when we cover the Math Area of Knowledge.

Unfortunately, the video does not make that question particularly accessible and, in my humble opinion, is not up to TED-Ed’s usual high standards. But I could still see showing at least a portion of it in class.

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October 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Ways To Teach Math Besides ‘Drill The Skill’”

Ways To Teach Math Besides ‘Drill The Skill’ is my latest Ed Week Teacher post.

Anne Collins, Sue O’Connell, Alexandra Mattis and José Luis Vilson share their thoughts and suggestions about teaching Math in Part One of a two-part series.

Here are some excerpts:

Any-strategy-that-is

In-order-for-students-to

math-shouldnt-be-limited

The-simple-answer-is

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October 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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PhotoMath & Reactions To It From Around The Web

photomath

You may have already heard about PhotoMath, the new iPhone app that lets you point it at a math problem on a textbook and then solves it while showing all the work involved.

Some are immediately reacting by citing it’s potential use in “cheating,” while others cheer that it might force math teachers and textbook publishers to be more creative in how they teach math. In some ways, it may force them to do what some of us in other subjects have been looking at — creating unGoogleable questions.

Here are some useful posts about the app, along with a video. I’m adding this post to The Best Sites For Beginning iPhone Users Like Me.

PhotoMath Could Change the Way We Think About Teaching Math is by Richard Byrne and, I think, is the first post you should look at.

We Should Wish PhotoMath All The Success In The World is by Dan Meyer.

PhotoMath from MicroBLINK on Vimeo.

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October 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My New BAM! Show: “How Can We Make Math More Engaging and Accessible to Students?”

mathmathmath

How Can We Make Math More Engaging and Accessible to Students? is the topic of my newest BAM! Radio Show.

Dr. Anne M. Collins and Sue O’Connell are my guests in this ten minute conversation. You’ll be able to read their written responses in my weekend post at Education Week Teacher.

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October 6, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Do You Teach Math Or Science To English Language Learners?

Do you teach math and/or science primarily to English Language Learners?

If you do, I’d love for you to either leave your email in a comment on this post (it will stay private) or use this form to contact me.

I’d like to invite teachers to share stories, suggestions, and techniques they’ve used to successfully teach math and science to ELLs.

Let me know if you’re interested in contributing!

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November 13, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Nice Spanish-Language Instructional Math Video Collection

'All About Math' photo (c) 2008, aleonmail - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Yesterday, I posted how I was working with our Geometry teacher to help support math instruction for my Beginning English Language Learners.

As part of that post, I referred to The Best Multilingual & Bilingual Sites For Math, Social Studies, & Science.

Today, that talented Geometry teacher, Wendy Jennings, found a collection of about fifty Spanish-language instructional videos for Algebra 1 and Geometry. They’ve been created by the Northeast Arkansas Education Cooperative, and can be found on their site and on their YouTube channel.

No matter what language they’re in, any math video is going to be “Greek” to me. But, Wendy likes them, so I’m adding the collection to The Best Multilingual & Bilingual Sites For Math, Social Studies, & Science.

Here’s a sample:

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April 29, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Math Instructional Videos In Spanish

In my post, The Best Multilingual & Bilingual Sites For Math, Social Studies, & Science, I share various links to online content knowledge and how to use them effectively with English Language Learners.

I’m adding some additional resources related to math instructional videos in Spanish though, at the same time, I recognize that they might be of superior quality.

One is the Khan Academy multilingual resources. They seem to have a number of resources in multiple languages, along with a separate YouTube channel for videos in Spanish. The richest man in the world, Carlos Slim, has also recently committed to have ALL their resources translated into Spanish.

You might also be interested in The Best Posts About The Khan Academy.

Tareas Plus has a huge number of instructional videos on math available for viewing, though it doesn’t appear that they have the same kind of follow-up exercises that Khan makes available. The videos seem to be available for free, and you can search for the ones you need. However, many of their video-based “courses” appear to require payment.

I’ll be adding this info to the “Best” list I mentioned in the first line of this post….

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March 6, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“KnowRe” Is A New Math Site Where Teachers Can Track Student Progress

I’m not convinced that the world needs another site where students can practice math and have teachers track their progress, but there’s a new one in town called KnowRe.

I’ll let math teachers judge the videos and exercises on the site. It’s free — at least for now.

I’m adding it to The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

I’m more familiar with sites on The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress list, but created the math list because of popular demand.

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January 22, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Create A Virtual Classroom With “XtraMath”

XtraMath joins a fairly lengthy list of sites that students can use for math practice and have teachers monitor their progress.

You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog.

I’m adding it to The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

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January 9, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Several Ways to Become Better at Teaching Math — Part Two”

Several Ways to Become Better at Teaching Math — Part Two is my newest Education Week Teacher post.

In it, Bob Peterson and Eric Gutstein offer an excerpt from their book, Rethinking Mathematics; Gary Rubinstein contributes an excerpt from his book, Beyond Survival; and I’m sharing several comments from readers.

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December 27, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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All My Math-Related “The Best…” Lists In One Place

The question next week at my Education Week Teacher blog will be related to math instruction.

Because of that upcoming question, I thought it would be useful to bring together the few “The Best…” lists that I have about math in one post:

The Best Math Websites For English Language Learners — 2007
The Best Science & Math Sites — 2008

The Best Science & Math Sites — 2009
The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

Is math a universal language or a foreign language for ELLs? is from MultiBriefs via Judie Haynes.

I hope you find them useful….

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August 30, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Visualizations Of How People Spend Their Days

There have been several visualizations created over the past couple of years showing how people spend their days. I’ve used them in lessons where students have created infographics indicating how they spend their time, and then they compare their results with the interactives.

Here are my choices for The Best Visualizations Of How People Spend Their Days:

How We Spend Our Time Now, in Three (Really Big) Graphs is from The Atlantic.

How Do You Spend Your Time? is from The Wall Street Journal.

Top 8 Ways Humans Spend Their Time, as Illustrated by Other Species is also from The Wall Street Journal.

What Americans Actually Do All Day Long, In 2 Graphics is the newest one, just published at NPR.

How Do You Spend Your Time? is a neat Wall Street Journal interactive from this year (2012), too. It’s based on Bureau of Labor Statistics data showing how the average American…spends his/her day. The difference in this one, though, is first you put your own data in saying how you spend your day. After you submit it, you’re compared with the average info.

In 2012, The Wall Street Journal has published a very accessible infographic titled At Work And At Play. It shows, by ethnicity, how Americans spend their work and leisure time. The data comes from the U.S. Department of Labor.

How The Average American Spends Their Day is a series of infographics showing how the average man, woman, and teenager spends their days. It’s a simplifed version of the next NY Times infographic.

The New York Times  published a fascinating infographic titled How Different Groups Spend Their Day in 2009.  Here’s how they describe it: “The American Time Use Survey asks thousands of American residents to recall every minute of a day. Here is how people over age 15 spent their time in 2008.” It actually shows what people did  every hour of everyday — sleeping, watching TV, eating, etc.  And the numbers are divided by ethnicity, age, education-background and more.  I could easily see having my students first do a similar analysis of their days and then comparing it to this infographic.  This one seems to have a different source of data than the Wall Street Journal visualizations use.

BONUS:

Here’s one on how they spend their money:

How the Average American Family Spends Money

Browse more infographics.

Feedback is always welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore over 900 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

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June 21, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Must-Watch Video On Khan Academy (& Must-Read Post About It)

Justin Reich just posted Don’t Use Khan Academy without Watching this First, and it’s a very important post where he shared this video two teachers (and an important commentary about it), Dave Coffey and John Golden, created:

I’m adding it to The Best Posts About The Khan Academy.

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June 19, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

ScootPad For Early Math & Reading Lessons

Thanks to reader Michelle Anthony, I’ve learned about ScootPad. It lets teachers set-up virtual classrooms to monitor student progress in grad one-to-three reading and math lessons. And it’s free.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress and to The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

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March 7, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

ZooWhiz Looks Like A Good Site For Math & English

ZooWhiz is a good — and free — Australian site with tons of interactive games and exercises for pre-school, elementary, and middle school (and for English Language Learners who are even older).

Users have to register for the site, and teachers can create virtual classrooms for their students.

I’m adding it to:

The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

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December 21, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

LearnZillion For Video Math Lessons You Can Monitor

LearnZillion has tons of free video math lessons that end with a quiz. Those in themselves are not that big of a deal, but three nice things about them are that they are designed by teachers, are free, and that teachers can create “virtual” classes and monitor student progress on them.

As a non-math teacher and as someone who detests anything to do with math, I cannot vouch for the quality of these lessons. However, I’m still adding it to The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

I heard about LearnZillion on NPR’s Market Watch program, and you can read/hear it here.

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