Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

November 13, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Nice Spanish-Language Instructional Math Video Collection

'All About Math' photo (c) 2008, aleonmail - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Yesterday, I posted how I was working with our Geometry teacher to help support math instruction for my Beginning English Language Learners.

As part of that post, I referred to The Best Multilingual & Bilingual Sites For Math, Social Studies, & Science.

Today, that talented Geometry teacher, Wendy Jennings, found a collection of about fifty Spanish-language instructional videos for Algebra 1 and Geometry. They’ve been created by the Northeast Arkansas Education Cooperative, and can be found on their site and on their YouTube channel.

No matter what language they’re in, any math video is going to be “Greek” to me. But, Wendy likes them, so I’m adding the collection to The Best Multilingual & Bilingual Sites For Math, Social Studies, & Science.

Here’s a sample:

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April 29, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Math Instructional Videos In Spanish

In my post, The Best Multilingual & Bilingual Sites For Math, Social Studies, & Science, I share various links to online content knowledge and how to use them effectively with English Language Learners.

I’m adding some additional resources related to math instructional videos in Spanish though, at the same time, I recognize that they might be of superior quality.

One is the Khan Academy multilingual resources. They seem to have a number of resources in multiple languages, along with a separate YouTube channel for videos in Spanish. The richest man in the world, Carlos Slim, has also recently committed to have ALL their resources translated into Spanish.

You might also be interested in The Best Posts About The Khan Academy.

Tareas Plus has a huge number of instructional videos on math available for viewing, though it doesn’t appear that they have the same kind of follow-up exercises that Khan makes available. The videos seem to be available for free, and you can search for the ones you need. However, many of their video-based “courses” appear to require payment.

I’ll be adding this info to the “Best” list I mentioned in the first line of this post….

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March 6, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“KnowRe” Is A New Math Site Where Teachers Can Track Student Progress

I’m not convinced that the world needs another site where students can practice math and have teachers track their progress, but there’s a new one in town called KnowRe.

I’ll let math teachers judge the videos and exercises on the site. It’s free — at least for now.

I’m adding it to The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

I’m more familiar with sites on The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress list, but created the math list because of popular demand.

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December 27, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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All My Math-Related “The Best…” Lists In One Place

The question next week at my Education Week Teacher blog will be related to math instruction.

Because of that upcoming question, I thought it would be useful to bring together the few “The Best…” lists that I have about math in one post:

The Best Math Websites For English Language Learners — 2007
The Best Science & Math Sites — 2008

The Best Science & Math Sites — 2009
The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

I hope you find them useful….

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August 30, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Visualizations Of How People Spend Their Days

There have been several visualizations created over the past couple of years showing how people spend their days. I’ve used them in lessons where students have created infographics indicating how they spend their time, and then they compare their results with the interactives.

Here are my choices for The Best Visualizations Of How People Spend Their Days:

How We Spend Our Time Now, in Three (Really Big) Graphs is from The Atlantic.

How Do You Spend Your Time? is from The Wall Street Journal.

Top 8 Ways Humans Spend Their Time, as Illustrated by Other Species is also from The Wall Street Journal.

What Americans Actually Do All Day Long, In 2 Graphics is the newest one, just published at NPR.

How Do You Spend Your Time? is a neat Wall Street Journal interactive from this year (2012), too. It’s based on Bureau of Labor Statistics data showing how the average American…spends his/her day. The difference in this one, though, is first you put your own data in saying how you spend your day. After you submit it, you’re compared with the average info.

In 2012, The Wall Street Journal has published a very accessible infographic titled At Work And At Play. It shows, by ethnicity, how Americans spend their work and leisure time. The data comes from the U.S. Department of Labor.

How The Average American Spends Their Day is a series of infographics showing how the average man, woman, and teenager spends their days. It’s a simplifed version of the next NY Times infographic.

The New York Times  published a fascinating infographic titled How Different Groups Spend Their Day in 2009.  Here’s how they describe it: “The American Time Use Survey asks thousands of American residents to recall every minute of a day. Here is how people over age 15 spent their time in 2008.” It actually shows what people did  every hour of everyday — sleeping, watching TV, eating, etc.  And the numbers are divided by ethnicity, age, education-background and more.  I could easily see having my students first do a similar analysis of their days and then comparing it to this infographic.  This one seems to have a different source of data than the Wall Street Journal visualizations use.

BONUS:

Here’s one on how they spend their money:

How the Average American Family Spends Money

Browse more infographics.

Feedback is always welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore over 900 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

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June 19, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

ScootPad For Early Math & Reading Lessons

Thanks to reader Michelle Anthony, I’ve learned about ScootPad. It lets teachers set-up virtual classrooms to monitor student progress in grad one-to-three reading and math lessons. And it’s free.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress and to The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

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March 7, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

ZooWhiz Looks Like A Good Site For Math & English

ZooWhiz is a good — and free — Australian site with tons of interactive games and exercises for pre-school, elementary, and middle school (and for English Language Learners who are even older).

Users have to register for the site, and teachers can create virtual classrooms for their students.

I’m adding it to:

The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

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December 21, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

LearnZillion For Video Math Lessons You Can Monitor

LearnZillion has tons of free video math lessons that end with a quiz. Those in themselves are not that big of a deal, but three nice things about them are that they are designed by teachers, are free, and that teachers can create “virtual” classes and monitor student progress on them.

As a non-math teacher and as someone who detests anything to do with math, I cannot vouch for the quality of these lessons. However, I’m still adding it to The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

I heard about LearnZillion on NPR’s Market Watch program, and you can read/hear it here.

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December 10, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Oxford Owl Is Great For Reading & Math

Oxford Owl is designed as a support site for parents to use with their children and help with reading and math. It’s great activities, though, would make it a nice addition to work during the school day, too. It has tons of online ebooks that provide audio support for the text, along with interactive follow-up exercises. It has plenty of math games and even math ebooks.

I’m adding it to The Best Websites To Help Beginning Readers.

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September 23, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Learning Games From BBC Schools

The BBC has recently added some new games to their Schools website. They’re good, but I wouldn’t necessarily say they are their best, so I won’t be adding them to any of my “The Best…” lists. They do provide some audio for the text, though, so they could also be engaging to English Language Learners:

Bitesize Science MI High

Bitesize Bamzooki Math

Bitesize Sarah Jane Adventures Science

Bitesize English Trapped

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September 15, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
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XtraMath

Here’s the newest addition to The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress:

This comes from Tracy Macfarlane: I love xtramath.org. It is a free site that helps kids master their math facts. Initially, the student takes an assessment quiz of what they already have mastered as indicated by a response of 3 seconds or less. Each consecutive session is based on the outcome of the previous assessments. It takes about 5 minutes a day, provides corrective feedback, visuals for goal setting, and can be used for the whole class or set up at home by a parent.

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September 12, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

“Study Ladder” Looks Great!

A big thanks to Kelvin Hartell, who let me know about Study Ladder.

It has impressive literacy, science and math interactives, and teachers can set-up “classrooms” to keep track of student work. Plus, it’s free!

I’m adding it to both The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress and to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

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September 11, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
12 Comments

The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress is a “The Best…” list that can come in very handy for teachers and for students. It lists free sites where teachers can register their students, and both can keep track of their progress. They can be useful for reinforcing concepts and language learned in the classroom. Most, thought not all, of the sites on that list focus on English.

I thought a similar list targeting sites that let teachers and students do the same with Math could be useful. I know that over the years I’ve seen a number of them, but never bothered to bookmark the sites.

So I put out a call blog and on Twitter for suggestions. Here is what people recommended, and I hope others will contribute more:

Brad Wilson made suggestion: Ten Marks is one that focuses on math. A colleague of mine really liked it, although I have not registered my own students before. Another for both ELA & math assessments is Easy CBM.

Nancye Blair wrote: Sokikom.com has a free component for number sense- fractions/decimals/prevents – that is very well developed, adaptive, and includes video tutorials. My students love it! They also have several components that one could pay to add on.

Bryan Corcoran said: One site that I’ve found to be quite beneficial is ThatQuiz.org. Toying around has found quite a variety of items to introduce and review with the students, and it catalogs quite a bit of data, making it easy to pinpoint individual problems, as well as class issues with specific math concepts.

Carrie Ward commented: In the past I have used Tutpop to register a whole class and track the progress they make with math through games played with each other as well as students from around the world! There are different levels, but it is aimed at elementary. I can’t remember who first told me about site, but I like it.

comes from Tracy Macfarlane: I love xtramath.org. It is a free site that helps kids master their math facts. Initially, the student takes an assessment quiz of what they already have mastered as indicated by a response of 3 seconds or less. Each consecutive session is based on the outcome of the previous assessments. It takes about 5 minutes a day, provides corrective feedback, visuals for goal setting, and can be used for the whole class or set up at home by a parent.

A big thanks to Kelvin Hartell, who let me know about Study Ladder. It has impressive literacy, science and math interactives, and teachers can set-up “classrooms” to keep track of student work. Plus, it’s free!

LearnZillion has tons of free video math lessons that end with a quiz. Those in themselves are not that big of a deal, but three nice things about them are that they are designed by teachers, are free, and that teachers can create “virtual” classes and monitor student progress on them.

As a non-math teacher and as someone who detests anything to do with math, I cannot vouch for the quality of these lessons. I heard about LearnZillion on NPR’s Market Watch program, and you can read/hear it here.

ZooWhiz is a good — and free — Australian site with tons of interactive games and exercises for pre-school, elementary, and middle school (and for English Language Learners who are even older). Users have to register for the site, and teachers can create virtual classrooms for their students.

You can apparently set up virtual classes at Khan Academy though, of course, there are other issues with Khan (see The Best Posts About The Khan Academy).

Thanks to reader Michelle Anthony, I’ve learned about ScootPad. It lets teachers set-up virtual classrooms to monitor student progress in grad one-to-three reading and math lessons. And it’s free.

Sumdog offers lots of online math games, and also lets you create a virtual classroom for your students.

XtraMath joins a fairly lengthy list of sites that students can use for math practice and have teachers monitor their progress. You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog.

I’m not convinced that the world needs another site where students can practice math and have teachers track their progress, but there’s a new one in town called KnowRe. I’ll let math teachers judge the videos and exercises on the site. It’s free — at least for now.

Function Carnival is a new site that lets you set-up virtual classes, have students watch videos, and then have them create graphs based on what they see. I don’t really understand it, but it looks cool, Dan Meyer helped create it (which means it has to be good), and you can read more about it here.

If you found post useful, you might want to explore the other 750 “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to blog for free.

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August 2, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
4 Comments

What Are Free Online Math Sites That Let Teachers Register “Classrooms” For Their Students?

The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress is a “The Best…” list that can come in very handy for teachers and for students. It lists free sites where teachers can register their students, and both can keep track of their progress. They can be useful for reinforcing concepts and language learned in the classroom.

Most, thought not all, of the sites on that list focus on English. I think a similar list targeting sites that let teachers and students do the same with Math could be useful. I know that over the years I’ve seen a number of them, but never bothered to bookmark the sites.

If you know of any, would you mind leaving a comment. If your recommendation is included in the list I post, I’ll be sure to credit the people who made the suggestions.

Thanks!

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September 16, 2010
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Change The Equation”

Change The Equation is a new organization (it actually launched today) that, as Claus von Zastrow (its CEO) says:

…is an outgrowth of President Obama’s Educate to Innovate campaign–It has over 100 corporate members who are joining forces to improve STEM education. The aim is to help them align their engagement and philanthropy to make a bigger difference than they can alone.

Claus’ name might be familiar to readers. I often quoted his writings when he was director of Learning First, his previous position.

Claus also has a new blog which I’ve added to my RSS reader, and I suspect many more will, too!

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