Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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July’s (2016) Best Tweets – Part Three

'Twitter' photo (c) 2010, West McGowan - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every month I make a few short lists highlighting my choices of the best resources I through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog.

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page.

You might also be interested in The Best Tweets Of 2015 – Part Two.

July 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week

Each week, I publish a post containing three or four particularly useful resources on classroom instruction, and you can see them all here.

You might also be interested in The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015 – So Far and The Best Resources On Class Instruction of 2016 – So Far.

Here are this week’s picks:

Teaching Religion in the Classroom Just Got More Political is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On How To Teach “Controversial” Topics.

Should Students Learn About Black Lives Matter in School? is from The Atlantic. It shares some good ideas, and I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Using Primary Sources.

As Project-Based Learning Gains in Popularity, Experts Offer Caution is from EdWeek. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

3 Challenges As Hands-On, DIY Culture Moves Into Schools is from NPR. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Maker Movement” — Help Me Find More.

I’m adding this first tweet to The Best Resources About “Culturally Responsive Teaching” & “Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy” – Please Share More!:

Here are two useful pieces of advice:

July 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2016 – So Far):

50 Years Seeking Educational Equality: Revisiting the Coleman Report is from Education Week.

What If Everything You Thought You Knew About Teachers Unions Turned Out to be Wrong? is from EdShyster. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Why Teachers Unions Are Important.

Meet Tim Kaine’s wife, a longtime child welfare advocate and Virginia’s secretary of education is from The Washington Post.

Rauner email: Half of CPS teachers ‘virtually illiterate’ is from The Chicago Tribune.

Here’s An Idea: Change The Federal Definition Of Student Achievement is from NPR. Letter details opposition to federal proposal defining student success on tests is from Ed Source and is on the same topic.

3 Ways That Performance-Based Assessment Addresses 3 Important Critiques of Standardized Assessment is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Performance Assessment.

New report is ‘huge warning sign’ that desegregation has failed in US schools is from The Guardian. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About School Desegregation (& Segregation) – Help Me Find More.

Former L.A. Unified teacher Rafe Esquith can continue with his lawsuit, judge rules is from The L.A Times. I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos On The Rafe Esquith Controversy/

Fired by L.A. schools, star teacher takes his Shakespeare lessons elsewhere is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to the same list.

July 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Grit” May Have Its Place, But Also Has To Be Kept In Its Place

Should Grit Be Taught and Tested in School? is a new, short and useful article at Scientific American.

Here’s how it ends:

A-growing-body-ofeee

You might also be interested in a piece I wrote for The Washington Post a few years ago – Why schools should not grade character traits.

I’m adding this info to The Best Resources For Learning About “Grit.”

July 22, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Vote To Choose “The Worst Year In History”

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At the end of each year, I have my ELL U.S. History students write about who they think has been the most influential person in United States history. I have that assignment, along with related resources, at The Best “Lists Of Lists” Of History’s Most Influential People, Events & Ideas.

I’ve occasionally done a similar project with my World History students.

Today, though, I had that idea turned a bit on its head when I saw Slate’s article, Is 2016 the Worst Year in History?

They give very accessible overviews of a number of other years and, then, at the end, readers can vote on their choice as the the worst year in history.

It got me thinking that something like this could be an interesting assignment – having students pick their choice for the worst year or having them choose who they think did the most harm to society.

The article is definitely worth a read.

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