Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

September 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Interactive Map: “100 Years of Unrest”

mapmap

100 Years of Unrest is an interactive map that has:

tried to gather information on social unrest throghout last century. Protests, uprisings, rebellions and revolts, civil wars, wars for independence, revolutions were mapped. Mapping events in time has enabled to follow hotspots or temporal trends of civil disobedience across the globe.

It’s based on information from Wikipedia.

Thanks to Google Maps Mania for the tip.

Print Friendly

September 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

How Can A Parrot Help Students Develop Self-Control?

Previous readers of this blog and my blogs are familiar with much of my writing about helping students develop self-control, including lessons using the famous Marshmallow Test (see The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control). In fact, in about ten days you’ll be able to read at my Ed Week Teacher column an interview I recently did with Dr. Walter Mischel, originator of that experiment.

One of the key elements of any of my self-control lessons is highlighting the different techniques that children used to avoid eating the marshmallow (looking away, etc.) and how students can apply them in class. In that “The Best” list, you’ll be able to see a fun Sesame Street video where The Cookie Monster demonstrates those same successful strategies, and my high school students love watching it as a refresher later in the school year after we learn about the Marshmallow Experiment in September.

And this leads me to parrots….

Researchers have found that some parrots, unlike other non-human species, also have a capacity for self-control, and created a version of the Marshmallow Experiment for them. You can read more about it at a Slate article titled A Parrot Passes the Marshmallow Test.

It’s very interesting but, as far as I’m concerned, the most useful part of the article is this short video. I plan showing it to students later in the year as another fun “refresher” — students can watch and identify the strategies used by the children and the parrot to reinforce their self-control.

I’m adding this info to my Best list on self-control.

Print Friendly

September 9, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Teaching Tolerance Releases Ambitious “literacy-based, anti-bias curriculum”

tolerance

Teaching Tolerance, the organization justifiably well-known for developing very good social-justice oriented teaching resources, has just unveiled: “Perspectives for a Diverse America… a literacy-based curriculum that marries anti-bias social justice content with the rigor of the Common Core State Standards.”

It’s a very ambitious site, and I think most teachers will find the highlight to be 300 great texts, often from larger works, all set-up to print out and copy for students. Those are a gold mine!

I hate to say it, but I generally found the site’s set-up to be fairly convoluted and confusing to navigate, though others may very well feel differently. But, whether you agree with me or not on that, I’m sure you’re going to agree that the texts are a wonderful resource.

You do have to register in order to access the site, but it takes a minute to do so.

I’m adding the site to The Best Teacher Resource Sites For Social Justice Issues.

Print Friendly

September 8, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Heganoo Looks Like A Very Nice & Easy Online Map-Making Site

heg

Heganoo looks like a very nice and easy online map-making site. After a quick registration (though I never received a confirmation email, but was still able to use the site without it) you can identify any location or locations on a map and make it a point-of-interest where you can add text, links and, most importantly as far as I’m concerned, an image by just pasting its url address. That ability to add an image via web address is a bit unusual for map-making sites.

I’m adding it to The Best Map-Making Sites On The Web.

You can read more about Heganoo at Google Maps Mania.

Print Friendly

September 8, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

My Latest British Council Post Shares A Fun Introductory Activity I Do Every Year

Building Relationships is the title of my latest British Council post where I share a fun introductory activity I do with students at the beginning of each school year.

It includes a link to a downloadable student hand-out, along with this artistically challenged teacher model I use:

whoamI-yldksu1

By the way, you can see all my previous British Council posts here.

Print Friendly

September 8, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

NEA Today Unexpectedly Runs Article Featuring Classroom Practice Of…Me?

justice

More Teachers Adopting Restorative Discipline Practices is the title of an NEA Today story that unexpectedly features my classroom practice.

I had a short email interaction with the writer over the summer, but hadn’t thought much would come of it.

You might find it interesting.

I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Classroom Management.

Print Friendly

September 8, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Here’s The Cover Of My Upcoming Third Book On Student Motivation (Along With Free Resources)

book cover

This is the cover of my upcoming third book on helping students develop intrinsic motivation (my own little trilogy :) ). It will be published by Routledge in early 2015.

You can get free resources from all my six books here, including downloading all student hand-outs from my previous two student motivation books.

Print Friendly

September 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Study: “Asking for Advice Makes You Seem More Competent, Not Less”

New York Magazine (and a bunch of other news outlets) recently reported on new research which found, as the headline of the magazine article and this post says, that “Asking for Advice Makes You Seem More Competent, Not Less.”

Here’s an excerpt:

Across-five-studies-a

I’ve certainly found this to be true, and often ask parents and students for their teaching advice, and definitely never hesitate asking the same of my colleagues.

This seems to be a variation of The Ben Franklin Effect, which I’ve previously discussed on more than one occasion.

The “Effect” goes:

You grow to like people for whom you do nice things and hate people you harm.

And, as I said in that previous post, a classroom version is:

Many teachers know that an effective classroom management move to turn a disruptive student into an ally is by giving him/her responsibilities in the classroom — tutoring another student, offering them a key classroom job, etc.

How has advice-seeking worked for you?

Print Friendly

September 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Four Valuable Posts On Classroom Instruction

Here are several recent and valuable resources on classroom instruction:

No More Language Arts and Crafts is a must-read post by the one-and-only Donalyn Miller, The Book Whisperer.

Dispelling the Myths: The Truth about Student Engagement is from the Alabama Best Practices Center. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On Student Engagement.

Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Formative Assessment.

I’m adding this tweet to The Best Resources For Learning How To Best Give Feedback To Students:

Print Friendly

September 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

September’s Infographics & Interactives Galore – Part One

There are just so many good infographics and interactives out there that I’ve begun a new semi-regular feature called “Infographics & Interactives Galore.”

You can see others at A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics and by searching “infographics” on this blog.

I’ll still be publishing separate posts to individually highlight especially useful infographics and interactives, but you’ll find others in this regular feature.

Here goes:

Big Bang: How the Universe was created is from the BBC and is “a four-minute animated guide to one of the greatest questions we’ve tried to solve.”

TuvaLabs has many datasets and tool for visual exploration of them. It’s designed for teachers and students.

Here is how “A Spacecraft For All” is described:

This Chrome Experiment follows the unlikely odyssey of the ISEE-3, a spacecraft launched in 1978 to study the Sun, but better known for its amazing accomplishments beyond that original mission. “A Spacecraft for All” is an interactive documentary combining film and 3D graphics, allowing you to follow the spacecraft’s story as you trace it along its entire 36 year journey.

How America’s refugee population has changed over time is an infographic from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day.

Telling Stories With Data and From Article to Infographic: Translating Information About ‘Sneakerheads’ are both NY Times Learning Network lessons on using infographics. I’m adding them to The Best Resources For Creating Infographics.

I’m adding this next infographic to The Best Online Resources For Drivers Education & Car Information:

Tips to Prevent a Car Accident

 

Print Friendly

September 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Quote Of The Day: “The Book That Got Teaching Right”

shopping

Samuel G. Freedman has written a great column in The New Yorker about the book Up the Down Staircase whose author, Bel Kaufman, died this past summer. His column is headlined The Book That Got Teaching Right.

Here’s an excerpt:

I-grabbed-a-copy-of-Up

I certainly had heard of the book and movie before, but only as a faint memory. I’ve ordered both now and looking forward to reading and watching!

Print Friendly

September 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Research Studies Of The Week

'magnifying glass' photo (c) 2005, Tall Chris - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

I often write about research studies from various fields and how they can be applied to the classroom. I write individual posts about ones that I think are especially significant, and will continue to do so. However, so many studies are published that it’s hard to keep up. So I’ve started writing a “round-up” of some of them each week or every other week as a regular feature.

By the way, you might also be interested in My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2013 and My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2014 – So Far.

Here are some new useful studies (and related resources):

How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn is from MindShift. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students.

Memories of errors foster faster learning is from Science Daily. I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures.

Science Confirms It: If You Want To Succeed, You Have To Screw Up is from Co-Create. I’m adding it to the same list.

Inside the teenage brain: New studies explain risky behavior is from Science Daily. I’m adding it to The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control.

Reacting to personal setbacks: Do you bounce back or give up? is from Eureka Alert. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About “Grit.”

What is keeping your kids up at night? Turning off electronics helps everyone sleep better is from Science Daily. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Helping Teens Learn About The Importance Of Sleep.

New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed is from MindShift. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

Print Friendly

September 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

September’s (2014) Best Tweets — Part One

'Twitter' photo (c) 2010, West McGowan - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every month I make a few short lists highlighting my choices of the best resources I through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog.

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page.

You might also be interested in The Best Tweets Of 2014 — So Far.

Print Friendly

September 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Even More Useful Articles & Videos On Race & Racism

September 6, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Teaching History In The News!

Boy, the teaching of history is in the news!

First up, Bill Gates, who thinks we should all learn math through the Khan Academy (see The Best Posts About The Khan Academy) because he likes it, now has a way in mind he wants us all to learn history. Read about it in today’s New York Times story, So Bill Gates Has This Idea for a History Class …

Apparently, Gates was watching this history video about history while running on his treadmill, and now has created a course he wants high schools to teach using this methodology. It’s called The Big History Project and, after a quick perusal, I wouldn’t put it on any of my “Best” lists. However, I am adding the piece to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

You’ll want to read the article, which provides a fair amount of space to valuable criticisms about education philanthropy, including this one:

“I just finished reading William Easterly’s ‘The Tyranny of Experts,’ ” says Scott L. Thomas, dean of the School of Educational Studies at Claremont Graduate University in California. “It’s about philanthropists and their effect on the poor globally. It’s this exact idea that here you have this ‘expert’ in the middle” — that is, Gates — “enabling the pursuit of this project. And frankly, in the eyes of the critics, he’s really not an expert. He just happens to be a guy that watched a DVD and thought it was a good idea and had a bunch of money to fund it.”

Here are some other interesting comments:

And here’s another excerpt from the article:

there-are-people-that

On the other hand, here are some more useful recent resources on teaching history:

Does It Help to Know History? is from The New Yorker.

American History-American Story is from Chris Lehmann

The New History Wars is from The New York Times.

Don’t Know Much Revisionist History is from Slate.

Print Friendly

September 6, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

 

I’ve started a somewhat regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention:

Florida Officials Will Fight Feds Over Testing of English-Language Learners is from Ed Week.

ELLs to Keep Increasing as K-12 Schools Cross ‘Majority-Minority’ Threshold is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Keep-Up With Current ELL/ESL/EFL News & Research.

Network Now has quite a few very good free downloadable materials for teaching and learning English. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Free ESL/EFL Hand-Outs & Worksheets.

Speaking Pal is a mobile app that “Interact with a virtual video tutor in short fun dialogs on your mobile and get instant pronunciation feedback. A natural speaking experience powered by Speech Recognition technology and innovative scoring logic.” I haven’t tried it yet, but it does have quite a few positive reviews. I’m adding it to The Best Mobile Apps For English Language Learners.

Lawmakers move to scrap English-only instruction is from The Los Angeles Times.

Teaching English is a free weekly online magazine that David Deubelbeiss curates, and I think all English teachers would find useful.

Here’s a simple and useful Instagram video from Edutopia with tips for teaching ELLs:

And here’s an Edutopia article that goes along with it that’s titled Strategies and Resources for Supporting English-Language Learners.

Information gap activities: what does it take to design a successful task? is from A Different Side Of EFL. I’m adding it to The Best Online Resources For “Information Gap” Activities.

Print Friendly