Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

April 26, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Colts’ Quarterback Andrew Luck Begins Book Club For Kids & Adults

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It’s not unusual for me students to tell me that they don’t have to worry about reading and writing well because they are planning on being a professional basketball player, skateboarder, etc, which is why I’ve published The Best Videos & Articles Where Athletes Explain How Reading & Writing Well Has Helped Their Career – Help Me Find More.

Thanks to Donalyn Miller, I’ve learned about a related story – Indianapolis Colts’ quarterback Andrew Luck has just begun a book club for kids and adults (the image of him at the top of this post is from his Stanford career).

You can learn all about it at The Andrew Luck Book Club and/or watch this video:

April 26, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Join A Thousand Educators At Our Ed Week ELL Webinar On Thursday

Wax seal. Very fancy. What's inside…? @groennfell Rob Friesel via Compfight

Katie Hull Sypnieski and I will be leading a free Thursday,April 28th webinar for Education Week on English-Learners and the Common Core: New Instructional Strategies. A thousand educators have already registered for it.  Our book, Navigating The Common Core With English Language Learners, is coming out the same time.

You can register for it here.

Here’s how Ed Week describes the Webinar:

This event takes place on Thursday, April 28, 2016, 3 to 4 p.m. ET.

As many educators are discovering, Common Core State Standards pose particular challenges for English-language learners in both language arts and mathematics, and yet the standards documents themselves provide little guidance for how teachers can help their ELLs meet the new objectives. In this webinar, veteran teachers Larry Ferlazzo and Katie Hull Sypnieski, authors of the forthcoming Navigating the Common Core With English Language Learners, will offer practical guidance on integrating the standards into instruction for ELLs. The authors will discuss research and developments in ELL education, examine the standards in depth with eye towards challenges and opportunities for ELL students, and provide targeted scaffolding techniques and instructional activities. The goal will be to give attendees a better understanding of how and when to adapt instruction under the common core to the particular needs of English-learners.

April 25, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Here’s How My Students Taught Their Classmates A Social Studies Unit – Handouts Included

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As regular readers know, I’m a big fan of students teaching their classmates, and tons of research backs-up the value of that practice (see The Best Posts On Helping Students Teach Their Classmates — Help Me Find More).

This past week was the most recent time I applied this idea in my classes.

I simultaneously teach World History and U.S. History English Language Learner classes (fortunately, this year I have the help of a student teacher – it gets a bit hectic when one is not around). World History students learned about World War I a couple of weeks prior to the U.S. History class getting there. So the World History students divided into pairs to prepare a short unit made-up of a cloze (also known as a “gap-fill” or “fill-in-the-blank” – see The Best Tools For Creating Clozes (Gap-Fills)); a data set, which is a series of short texts that students categorize and supplement with more information they find (see The Best Resources About Inductive Learning & Teaching); and a “Make-and-Break,” a term coined by my friend and mentor Kelly Young to describe a simple sequencing activity.

Here is the entire prep and planning packet used by my World History students, which also included a requirement to prepare teaching “moves” and a lesson plan. The process is easily adaptable to just about any topic or subject area. It’s somewhat similar to a lesson you’ll find in one of my student motivation books.

I gave students four days to prepare the unit, including making a master packet and multiple copies of student hand-outs for when they taught. Here is an example of one of the master packets prepared by a group of students.

Fortunately, we were able to use the library for our three days of teaching. U.S. History students were divided into seven groups, as were the World History students. Each group was assigned to a table, and each day the World History group taught one of the three lessons. At the end of each day, the U.S. History students would do some reading in their textbook for a few minutes while I met with the World History class to review the lesson for the following day.

It all went very well. The U.S. History students are eager now to “turn-the-tables,” and both classes will be using the same process on a historical topic of their choice for part of their final “exam” – a “Genius Hour” version (see The Best Resources For Applying “Fed Ex Days” (Also Known As “Genius Hours”) To Schools).

Here are a few reflective comments by my World History students:

When I teach, I liked to tell what I learn and know about the lesson.

When I teach, I learned be a teacher was not easy so we have to be nice to our teacher.

I learned about to be more patient and pay attention to others.

I like about taught other people what I know. I like the way they focus and hard-working what I’m teaching.

What I liked about this project is that I could help my “students” understand what we were doing.

What I learned about teaching is that it could be hard work if the student does not focus.

Teaching is a responsible profession that you need to carry with you because the future of your students depends on you.

I learned how to explain something to the students.

April 25, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My Latest NY Times Interactive For ELLs Is On Parrots & Pets

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My latest New York Times Learning Network interactive for English Language Learners is on parrots and pets. Students have to choose correct word definitions and a summary, and then write about their favorite pets.

I’m adding it to:

All My NY Times Posts For English Language Learners – Linked With Descriptions

The Best Sites For Learning About Animals

April 24, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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April’s (2016) Best Tweets – Part Three

'Twitter' photo (c) 2010, West McGowan - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every month I make a few short lists highlighting my choices of the best resources I through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog.

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page.

You might also be interested in The Best Tweets Of 2015 – Part Two.

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