Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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SEL Weekly Update

I’ve recently begun this weekly post where I’ll be sharing resources I’m adding to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources or other related “Best” lists:

Seven Facts on Noncognitive Skills from Education to the Labor Market looks very interesting. It’s from The Hamilton Project. I’m adding it to The Best Info On Skills Employers Are Looking For In Job-Seekers.

3 science-backed rituals that will boost your motivation is from Barking Up The Wrong Tree. I’m adding it to Best Posts On “Motivating” Students.

When Practice Does Make Perfect is by Dan Willingham. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice.

Growth mindset: practical tips you may not have tried yet is from The Guardian. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

January 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Look Back: “I Did My Best Job Teaching A “Growth Mindset” Today – Here’s The Lesson Plan”

In February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

This post was originally published in 2016:

As regular readers know, I’m a big believer in teaching and implementing strategies to promote a growth mindset (see The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”). Plus, you can find additional related lesson plans in my books.

Today, I tried a new version with my IB Theory of Knowledge classes that went very well. In fact, I think it’s the best one I’ve ever done, and it’s very simple.

Here’s what I did:

Students came in to the class finding the phrase “Growth Mindset” on the overhead. I asked people to raise their hand if they had every heard of it before today. A fair number had, since we have a big focus on Social Emotional Learning at our school. I explained that the class today would be a refresher for them and an introduction to those who didn’t know much about it.

I explained that I was going to show three videos (happily, none were blocked by The Best Ways To Deal With YouTube’s Awful Safety Mode).  Each video, I said, would illustrate elements of having a growth mindset.  I told them I wanted to write down on a sheet of paper what elements they saw exhibited in the video and how they were demonstrated.

Here were the videos I showed (I gave students a minute to write after each video, every other row of students would move up one seat after each clip to share with a partner, and I would then ask a few students to say what they wrote to the entire class). These videos and more can be found at The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More:

Here’s the combined list of Growth Mindset qualities both of my classes developed:

growth

Then, after I gave students a very quick introduction to Carol Dweck and shared a story about my meeting a person who worked with Gandhi who told me that the key to Gandhi’s success was “that he looked at every problem as an opportunity, not as a pain in the butt,” I gave students copies of this NPR report, Students’ View of Intelligence Can Help Grades.  I had them rotate again, alternate reading paragraphs out loud with their partner, and then write a paragraph responding to this prompt:

According to Carol Dweck, what is a “growth mindset” and why is it important? Do you agree with what Dweck is saying? To support your opinion you may use examples from your own experiences, your observations of others, and any of your readings (including this article).

After they wrote their paragraphs, they rotated again and read them to their partner. I called up one student to share it on the overhead and had them read their piece to the class (I’ll actually be publishing a sample of them on this blog over the weekend).

Then, I showed the well-known “Two Mindsets” diagram on the overhead, quickly reviewed it, and told an example from my life for three on the list — challenges (changing careers to become a teacher); obstacles (explaining how I lost the game for my basketball team this week but I didn’t quit the team and, instead, plan on practicing my shooting this weekend) and criticism (how I learned a lot from the anonymous class evaluations students did of my last week). After writing a few words about each one on the growth mindset side of the diagram, I explained that I was going to give students copies and wanted them to think and briefly about when they had exhibited those growth mindset qualities in their own lives. We were running short of time by then, so I only gave them a few minutes, explaining that they didn’t have to write something about every one of the qualities.

We rotated again, students shared with a partner, followed by my calling on a few students to share what they wrote.

Then, with only a few minutes left in the period, I told students that at the top of the growth mindset side of the diagram, I wanted them to write as many adjectives as they could think of that would describe how they felt during and after the moments they acted with a growth mindset. My example was that I felt “confident” in myself after successfully changing careers.

I finished-up by calling on some students (though, in my second class, I had enough time to have everyone share), and got a ton of great words, including inspired, strong, delighted, successful, etc.

It went very, very well. I’ll still do my other growth mindset lesson plans (those are designed for English Language Learners and for ninth-grade students facing challenges), but this one is a big winner, too!

Feedback is welcome!

January 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2016 – Part Two):

More Students Are Graduating Because High School Is Getting Less Boring is from Vice. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Pointing Out That Our Schools Are Not Failing — Please Suggest More.

Forget charter schools and vouchers — here are five business ideas school reformers should adopt appeared in The L.A. Times. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Explaining Why Schools Should Not Be Run Like Businesses.

What Is the Future of Public Education? is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Articles On What The Trump Presidency Might Mean For Schools.

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Builds Political Muscle for Philanthropic Work is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

Supreme Court wrestles with defining rights for students with disabilities, including autism is from The Washington Post.

Milwaukee’s Voucher Verdict is from The American Prospect. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Why School Vouchers Are A Bad Idea.

Why the racist history of school vouchers matters today is from Think Progress. I’m adding it to the same list.

Everybody in California will want to read this one: Governor proposes minimal funding increase for K-12 schools next year

Betsy DeVos, Trump’s Education Pick, Plays Hardball With Her Wealth is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Our New U.S. Secretary of Education.

January 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two

Here are this week’s choices:

Ending the No Child Left Behind Catch-22 on English learner progress is an important article in Ed Source by LINDA DARLING-HAMMOND AND KENJI HAKUTA.

The ten key attributes of an outstanding MFL teacher appeared in TES. You might also be interested in my post, A Look Back: Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner.

Unlocking Learning: Science as a Lever for English Learner Equity is from The Education Trust. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Teaching The Next Generation Science Standards To English Language Learners.

How do I make my anchor charts ELL friendly?  is by Valentina Gonzalez.  I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Providing Scaffolds To Students.

Careful About That Dual-Language Coverage! appeared at The Grade.

I’ve previously talked about how to use the game CatchPhrase with English Language Learners, using Jimmy Fallon as a model (see Jimmy Fallon Models Yet Another Good Game For English Language Learners). This past week, he played it with Michelle Obama:

January 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Look Back: “Here’s How My Students Taught Their Classmates A Social Studies Unit – Handouts Included”

teach

In February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

This post was originally published in 2016:

As regular readers know, I’m a big fan of students teaching their classmates, and tons of research backs-up the value of that practice (see The Best Posts On Helping Students Teach Their Classmates — Help Me Find More).

This past week was the most recent time I applied this idea in my classes.

I simultaneously teach World History and U.S. History English Language Learner classes (fortunately, this year I have the help of a student teacher – it gets a bit hectic when one is not around). World History students learned about World War I a couple of weeks prior to the U.S. History class getting there. So the World History students divided into pairs to prepare a short unit made-up of a cloze (also known as a “gap-fill” or “fill-in-the-blank” – see The Best Tools For Creating Clozes (Gap-Fills)); a data set, which is a series of short texts that students categorize and supplement with more information they find (see The Best Resources About Inductive Learning & Teaching); and a “Make-and-Break,” a term coined by my friend and mentor Kelly Young to describe a simple sequencing activity.

Here is the entire prep and planning packet used by my World History students, which also included a requirement to prepare teaching “moves” and a lesson plan. The process is easily adaptable to just about any topic or subject area. It’s somewhat similar to a lesson you’ll find in one of my student motivation books.

I gave students four days to prepare the unit, including making a master packet and multiple copies of student hand-outs for when they taught. Here is an example of one of the master packets prepared by a group of students.

Fortunately, we were able to use the library for our three days of teaching. U.S. History students were divided into seven groups, as were the World History students. Each group was assigned to a table, and each day the World History group taught one of the three lessons. At the end of each day, the U.S. History students would do some reading in their textbook for a few minutes while I met with the World History class to review the lesson for the following day.

It all went very well. The U.S. History students are eager now to “turn-the-tables,” and both classes will be using the same process on a historical topic of their choice for part of their final “exam” – a “Genius Hour” version (see The Best Resources For Applying “Fed Ex Days” (Also Known As “Genius Hours”) To Schools).

Here are a few reflective comments by my World History students:

When I teach, I liked to tell what I learn and know about the lesson.

When I teach, I learned be a teacher was not easy so we have to be nice to our teacher.

I learned about to be more patient and pay attention to others.

I like about taught other people what I know. I like the way they focus and hard-working what I’m teaching.

What I liked about this project is that I could help my “students” understand what we were doing.

What I learned about teaching is that it could be hard work if the student does not focus.

Teaching is a responsible profession that you need to carry with you because the future of your students depends on you.

I learned how to explain something to the students.

January 13, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week

Each week, I publish a post containing three or four particularly useful resources on classroom instruction, and you can see them all here.

You might also be interested in The Best Articles (& Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources On Class Instruction In 2016 – Part Two.

Here are this week’s picks:

ENGAGED CEREBRAL CLASSROOM CULTURE: AIDAN THOMAS’ MASTER CLASS ON WAIT TIME is from Doug Lemov. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On The Idea Of “Wait Time.”

I’m adding this tweet to The Best Posts On Looking At Our Students Through The Lens Of Assets & Not Deficits:

I’m adding this tweet to Best Posts On Metacognition:

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