Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 5, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Resources On Race & Racism

DSC06494 Light Brigading via Compfight

Here are new additions to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More:

How Educators Can Respond to Charleston is from Bright.

Attitudes Toward Racism And Inequality Are Shifting is from Five Thirty Eight.

Confronting Racial Injustice in Schools is from Ed Week.


via John Holland

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July 4, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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SEL Weekly Update

I’ve recently begun this weekly post where I’ll be sharing resources I’m adding to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources or other related “Best” lists:

I’m adding these first two links to The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control:

How Can We Help All Students Pass The Marshmallow Test? is by Jessica Weible at the Center For Teaching Quality.

New research challenges the idea that willpower is a “limited resource” is from BPS Research Digest (though I’m not convinced).

Survey Suggests Social and Emotional Learning Has Staked a Claim in Schools is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources.

‘That’s Good Enough': Three Little Words to Explain a Box-Office Flop is from The Atlantic and ends with a perfect quotation to help teach a growth mindset – if only it didn’t contain a word inappropriate for the classroom.

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July 4, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Actively Learn” Looks Like A New Tool My Students Will Be Using A Lot

activelylearn

Richard Byrne wrote about a new tool a couple of days ago called Actively Learn, and it really looks like a winner.

Richard provides a pretty thorough explanation of the site, and I’d encourage you to go to his post to read about it. A quick summary is that it teachers can create virtual classrooms, students can read and annotate tons of materials the site already has (and teachers can upload their own, too – including webpages), and teachers can embed questions they want students to answer. And it’s free (you can pay for a premium service, but what it offers for free works for me).

I’ve embedded a video below that provides a short overview. One other great feature of the site is that it has tons of videos clearly explaining how to use each of its features.

I’m adding this post to:

The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

Best Applications For Annotating Websites

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July 4, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Call For Video Clips Showing “Grit” – The Long Term Kind

I have a number of good videos at The Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit.”

However, theoretically at least, grit is supposed to mean perseverance focusing on a longer-term goal. Most of the clips on that “Best” list communicate the idea of perseverance, but more on shorter-term goals.

I’d like to find more clips like these next two — any ideas? More sports ones are fine, though I’d like to find non-sports examples, too. Yes, I’m aware of many of the criticisms of grit, too, and have written about them, as well. However, I still think it’s possible to recognize and celebrate the grit our students show every day, and that they’ve shown in the past, in other arenas, and also encourage them to transfer it to the classroom. A video or two can’t hurt.

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July 3, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Brand New “Declaration Project” Collects All The World’s Independence Declarations

declaration

The Declaration Project
, which went public just yesterday, collects all the world’s declarations of independence.

Here’s how it describes itself:

The Declaration Project is an interactive site that features a comprehensive collection of declarations of independence and kindred declarations crafted in the U.S. and the world over. While the ‘Declaration Collection’ component of this project is a centerpiece, there are two other key parts to this initiative: ‘My Declaration™‘ gives you the opportunity to compose and post your own declaration, and for others to respond to it. And the ‘Spirit of ’76 Cafe™’ features ongoing participatory explorations of the themes that resonate in our July 4, 1776 Declaration of Independence and others included here .

I’m not sure how useful the last two parts are really going to be to teachers or students, but the collection itself could be very helpful.

In some ways it’s like a less slick Constitute, which was created by the University of Texas at Austin and funded by Google, and provides an easily searchable database of the constitutions from 160 countries. The really extraordinary feature there is the ability to search for common themes (click “browse topics”).

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