The phrase “learning loss” is the latest buzz word in education circles, and I’m very concerned that the dominant narrative at this time could compound any pandemic damage we’ve all been experiencing over the past year.

The question is NOT “How do we add more school time to students’ schedule post-pandemic?”

The question IS “How can we best support students academically and emotionally post-pandemic?”

Unfortunately, it appears to be the former, not the latter, question driving the public discussion.

 

In terms of research, the two places where I recommend to start are:

  1. Sarah Sparks’ piece in Ed Week today, How Much Real Learning Time Are Students Losing During the Pandemic?
  2. The Best Resources On The Idea Of Extending The School Day

 

For teacher and student voice, check out:

  1. My two pieces in The Washington Post,  Teacher: What’s missing from calls for summer school to stem ‘learning loss’ The kind of teaching kids need right now
  2. Neema Avashia’s guest post at my Ed Week column, Students Respond to Adults’ Fixation on ‘Learning Loss’
  3. Marian Dingle’s guest post at my Ed Week column,The Idea of ‘Learning Loss’ Begs Us to Ask, ‘Loss From What?’

 

I’m happy to add additional resources I find, or that readers suggest.

If you’d like to bring more student voice to the discussion, here are the questions that Neema asked her students:

  • During the pandemic, what are things that you feel like you’ve lost?
  • During the pandemic, what are the ways that you have seen yourself grow or learn new things?
  • Many adults in education right now are very focused on the idea of “learning loss.” They think that kids are falling behind academically during the pandemic. What do you want those adults to know about you and your experience during the pandemic?

A Washington, D.C. City Councilwoman saw Neema’s column and modified here questions in this way:

 

Perhaps we can work together to bring sanity back to forefront…

Addendum:

Is There Any Teacher Who Would NOT Want To Participate In “The Imagining September Project”?

My Students On What They’ve Lost & Learned, & What They Need

What does the evidence say about… increased instructional time? is from FORA Education.

Here’s an excerpt from Does It Hurt Children to Measure Pandemic Learning Loss?:

YES, LET’S STOP TALKING ABOUT A “LOST YEAR” – AND “LEARNING LOSS”

Pandemic learning gains: Resilience. Responsibility. Lunch. is from The Christian Science Monitor.

‘Learning Loss, in General, Is a Misnomer’: Study Shows Kids Made Progress During COVID-19 is from Ed Week.

What Students Are Saying About ‘Learning Loss’ During the Pandemic is from The NY Times Learning Network.

Many worry about ‘learning loss,’ but has this really been a lost year for CPS students? is from The Chicago Sun Times.

Integrating the Science of Learning and Culturally Responsive Practice by Zaretta Hammond is in the latest issue of The American Educator.

ANOTHER DAY, ANOTHER LAMENTATION ABOUT LEARNING LOSS