The story of Anne Frank is an engaging one for English Language Learners and mainstream students alike. I’ve personally used the great film Anne B. Real for years in my ninth-grade English classes. It’s about an inner-city teenager who reads and re-reads the Diary. The Diary also plays a prominent role in The Freedom Writers movie. Students watching both movies were inspired to read the Diary itself.

Here are some other additional resources on Anne Frank.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Sites For Learning About The Holocaust

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Here are my choices for The Best Sites To Learn About Anne Frank (that are also accessible to English Language Learners):

The British newspaper The Guardian has  written about, and posted, a short video clip appearing on YouTube which shows a few seconds of Anne Frank.  It’s only a few seconds, but it will still be a valuable clip to show to show in the classroom.

Here are a series of online activities for ELL’s related to the release of that video.

Famous People Lessons has a site just for English Language Learners about Anne Frank.

A horse-chestnut tree in Amsterdam was a source of joy and inspiration to Anne Frank. There is an online Anne Frank Tree project where students can easily leave a virtual leaf sharing their thoughts on freedom, courage and giving (unfortunately, that tree was recently toppled in a storm).

Here’s a short video of her biography.

Students can try this Anne Frank “Webquest” (which is more like a scavenger hunt).

The Secret Annex Online is a 3D interactive of Anne Frank’s hiding place during World War II. If you’re learning about Anne Frank in you class, this is a not-to-be-missed resource.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has a great interactive titled Anne Frank The Writer: An Unfinished Story. It provides audio support for the text.

Here is the only moving image of Anne Frank.

How to teach… Anne Frank is from The Guardian.

Anne Frank and her family were also denied entry as refugees to the U.S. is from The Washington Post. Here’s an excerpt:

Otto-Franks-efforts-to

How a 7-year-old Aleppo girl on Twitter became our era’s Anne Frank is from The Washington Post.

Here’s how the News Hour describes this follow-up video:

Last year, Bana Alabed sparked a worldwide following for tweeting from Aleppo in Syria while it was under attack amid a years-long civil war. Now, the 8-year-old is authoring a book about surviving and escaping the conflict. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Marcia Biggs talked to Alabed and her mother in Ankara, Turkey, where they are living today.

Here’s another Anne Frank webquest.

Here’s the YouTube Channel of the Anne Frank House.

Anne Frank in the World, 1929 – 1945 Teacher Workbook is from The Utah Education Network.

The Diary of Anne Frank, Reimagined is an Atlantic review of a new “graphic novel” version of the Diary of Anne Frank. The Diary of Anne Frank is one of the few novels I’ve found available in multiple translations that I use with ELLs (see USING “THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK” WITH ELL NEWCOMERS!).

WOULD YOU PASS “THE ANNE FRANK TEST”?

 

Google Arts & Culture has just unveiled an online exhibit about Anne Frank and her home. It’s pretty impressive – and complete.

Feedback and suggestions are welcome!

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You might also want to explore the 400 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.