Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

The Best Science Sites Of 2018 – So Far

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Time for another mid-year “Best” list.

I’ll be adding this to All 2018 Mid-Year “Best” Lists – In One Place!

You might also be interested in:

The Best Science Sites Of 2017 – Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2017 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2015

The Best Science Sites Of 2014 – Part Two

The “All-Time” Best Science Sites

The Best Science Sites Of 2014 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2013 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2012 — Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2012 — Part One

The Best Science Sites Of 2011

The Best Science Sites Of 2011 — So Far

The Best Science Websites — 2010

The Best Science & Math Sites — 2009

The Best Science & Math Websites — 2008

The Best Science Websites For Students & Teachers — 2007

Here are my choices for this year – so far:

Here’s how Smithsonian Magazine describes NASA’s new “Exoplanet Travel Bureau”:

NASA has launched the Exoplanet Travel Bureau, a visualization tool that allows users to explore the surfaces of three exoplanets: Kepler-16b, Kepler-186f, and TRAPPIST-1e. The 360-degree visualizations, which can be seen on your computer, phone, tablet or using a virtual reality headset, are artists’ renderings—there are no photographic images of these planets, so the graphics are based on hypotheticals. You can change the scene by adding or subtracting hypothetical atmospheres, creating skies, clouds and weather.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Planets & Space.

Climate change and life events is an interactive that lets you show how your personal life events correspond to global climate changes. I’m adding it to  The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

“Best” Lists Of The Week: Planets & Space

The European Space Agency has just released an amazing interactive map of 1.7 billion stars. You can check it out at here and read more about it at A mesmerizing new atlas of the Milky Way has 1.7 billion stars in it. I’m adding it to The Best Images Taken In Space.

I’ve previously posted some of the group OK Go’s music videos, and was pleased to read that they had teamed-up with Google to create the OK Go Sandbox, a collection of classroom activities connected to their music.

This is one of the more amazing videos of Rube Goldberg machines you’ll see.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Rube Goldberg Machines.

No, President Trump, Just Because It’s Cold Outside Today Doesn’t Mean Global Warming Isn’t Happening

National Geographic has a series called 101 Videos that are engaging and accessible, and cover a variety of topics.

Here’s how they describe it:

Explore and experience some of nature’s most intriguing phenomena in the 101 series, a science class unlike any other.

There are forty-nine clips now, and they regularly add new ones.

This new animated video would be good for IB Theory of Knowledge classes, as well as others.

It echos the famous Richard Feynman quote about ““The Difference Between Knowing The Name Of Something & Knowing Something.” I’ve embedded that video at the bottom of this post.

Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

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