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The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – Part Two

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Another day, another annual “Best” list (you can find all 1,500 Best lists here).

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators ; The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More ; The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More! ;  The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More ; The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem” and The Best Videos For Teaching & Learning About Figurative Language.

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Showing Good & Bad Classroom Discussions

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More

The Best Movie/TV Scenes Demonstrating Metacognition – Help Me Find More

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – Part Two (some may have been produced prior to this year, but are just new to me):

TED-Ed has published an interesting lesson and video on “How computers translate human language.” I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Google Translate & Other Forms Of Machine Translation.

Gloria Ladson Billings recently did this video for Brainwaves, the great – and growing – collection of video interviews with educators. You might also want to read her contribution to my Education Week Teacher column last year, The Teachers of Color ‘Disappearance Crisis.’

I’ve written a fair amount about how and where to find accurate quotations, as well as sharing examples when “quotations” have been used inaccurately (see The Best Places To Find Quotations On The Web). John Oliver did a great segment on his show about these kind of “made-up” quotes and, surprisingly, it’s even classroom appropriate! See the video here. (it’s not embeddable).

Here are two intriguing videos about language today and tomorrow:

I shared this video from Ron Berger at Expeditionary Learning over at my Education Week Teacher blog a couple of years ago, but never posted it here.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Getting Student Writers To “Buy-Into” Revision – Help Me Find More.

8-Bit Philosophy is a useful series of videos from Wisecrack. You’ve got to pick-and-choose, but a number of their videos can be engaging and informative for students, and presented in an exceptionally unique form. Here’s an example:

Here’s how this maker of this video describes it:

A geopolitical history of all empires, nations, kingdoms, armies and republics. More than 500 world maps spanning all historical events up to today.

The Atlantic has begun to publish a thirteen-part series of videos on race. These first two have been animations, and I assume the rest will be the same.

I’m adding these to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More:

I plan on showing this video, then sharing the writing prompt below, and then show the video again… I’m adding this post to both The Best Videos Showing The Importance Of Asking Good Questions — Help Me Find More and to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

What do you think the video is saying asking questions? Do you agree with what it says? To support your opinion, be sure to include specific examples drawn from your own experience, your observations of others, or any of your readings.

I’m adding this video to The Best Resources For Learning The Advantages To Being Bilingual Or Multilingual:

Christina Torres shared this amazing video from a District staff meeting in Iowa. The first minute is the typical boring stuff, but keep watching….

This video is from PBS, and is a great one for IB Theory of Knowledge teachers when exploring the arts. Even more interesting – to me, at least – is how it can applied to an understanding of “close reading.” I suspect David Coleman, the primary author of the Common Core Standards, would not necessarily agree with what the video says about the critical importance of context… I’m adding this to The Best Resources On Close Reading Paintings, Photos & Videos.

I’m adding this very useful video to two lists:

The Best Resources For Learning The Advantages To Being Bilingual Or Multilingual

The Best Resources For Showing Students That They Make Their Brain Stronger By Learning

I think the most useful part of this next video begins at about the two-minute mark. It’s definitely something I’d show to students when we start talking about the importance of revising one’s work. I’m adding this post to The Best Resources On Getting Student Writers To “Buy-Into” Revision – Help Me Find More.

Here’s a very young Morgan Freeman demonstrating a fun classroom game. I’m adding it to The Best Places To Learn About (And View Video Clips Of) Teachers In The Movies.

This is a great short video from Google about Google Translate.

The most translated words are:

“How are you?”
“Thank you.”
“I love you.”

It’s also a little scary to know they receive all that data from the app.

I’m adding this post to The Best Sites For Learning About Google Translate & Other Forms Of Machine Translation.

Here’s a great video that Jim Bentley shared on Twitter. It’s from the 1940’s and is titled “Progressive Education” and is from the 1940’s:

Thanks to Emily Butler Smith for sharing this video on Twitter.

You might also be interested in The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

I’ve seen haka done by Pacific Islander students at our school, and on video from New Zealand rugby games, but never one like this. It was shared by @jybuell on Twitter, and you can read more about it here on CNN.

I was looking for short videos that give good introductions to Social Emotional Learning, and am adding these two to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources:

StoryCorps unveiled a new animated video earlier this year. Here’s how they describe it:

Alex Landau, an African American man, was raised by his adoptive white parents to believe that skin color didn’t matter. But when Alex was pulled over by Denver police officers one night in 2009, he lost his belief in a color-blind world—and nearly lost his life. Alex tells his mother, Patsy Hathaway, what happened that night and how it affects him to this day.

I’m adding it to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More:

I think you’ll find this two-part interview Jon Stewart did with Ta-Nehisi Coates very interesting – I certainly did.

You might also be interested in the review of the book that recently appeared in my Ed Week Teacher column.

I’m adding these videos to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More.

I’m adding this video from Business Insider to The Best Websites To Learn About Various Religions (& English):

I’ve written a lot about Luis Rodriguez, one our students’ favorite authors.

Here’s a new, and great, news segment on him (it may or may not show up in an RSS Reader):

Where did English come from? is the title of a neat lesson and video from TED-Ed.

I’m adding it to The Best Videos Documenting The History Of The English Language.

You’ll want to watch this new NPR animation accompanied by Jonathan Kozol reading from his classic education book, “Death At An Early Age”:

Video: “Watch President Obama deliver eulogy at Rev. Pinckney’s funeral” (this post includes the video and a lot of commentary)

I’m adding this video to The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading:

I’ve previously shared a lesson, and a collection of videos, I use for a lesson on perception in my Theory of Knowledge class (see Videos: Here’s The Simple Theory of Knowledge Lesson On Perception I Did Today).

Today, I discovered a great series of short commercials with the theme “Don’t Judge Too Quickly” that would make a great addition to that lesson. Plus, they would good for English Language Learners to watch and describe what they see, along with learning the critical thinking lesson that it’s dangerous to make assumptions.

First off, here’s a group of them together. The second to the last one, however, is probably not appropriate to show in class:

Here’s another one:

There are others on YouTube, too, but, like the one I cautioned about in the first collection, they are a little “iffy” to show in class.

Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

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